It's 100 years ago and you live where you live right now...

#1
Copying a discussion on another forum. It's 1919 and you live in the area that you live in now. You've survived WW1 of course but possibly you have a sore throat and a bit of a cold coming on. What's your life like and what problems do you face.

If I survived the war in Europe I've been demobbed very quickly. Maybe I got wounded at Passchendaele or something and got a medical discharge. That aside I'm home in Tipperary and The Irish War of Independence kicked off last month when a group of Republicans killed two policemen just 15 miles from my home. I don't know any of the men who the police are looking for but rumour has it that a local boy named Paddy Aherne was involved somehow. There are a lot of Republicans living in my area and as an ex British soldier I will almost certainly have to join the IRA when it comes into existence in the near future or be regarded as a loyalist at best, or a spy at worst. That's enough to get me killed around here. Quite likely I'll be done in by a man whose grandson will be a good friend of mine in 2019. Or by my own grandad or a great uncle. If I survive that war I'll have to pick a side in the Civil War in 1922. Given where I live I have a good chance of going anti-Treaty. Fúck it but there's no end to this shite.

So what's going on with you?
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#3
I have a few pre WW1 photos of my house.

**** all has changed really.

Apart from having less cars and more horses, I imagine my life is pretty similar to be honest. Our farm (and all the others round here) in 1919 is obviously less reliant on machinery, but the general gist of it is much the same. I still shoot in the same places and with the same guns, except they’re new now. There are more pubs in my village in 1919.

Things are probably better truth be told.

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#5
Copying a discussion on another forum. It's 1919 and you live in the area that you live in now. You've survived WW1 of course but possibly you have a sore throat and a bit of a cold coming on. What's your life like and what problems do you face.

If I survived the war in Europe I've been demobbed very quickly. Maybe I got wounded at Passchendaele or something and got a medical discharge. That aside I'm home in Tipperary and The Irish War of Independence kicked off last month when a group of Republicans killed two policemen just 15 miles from my home. I don't know any of the men who the police are looking for but rumour has it that a local boy named Paddy Aherne was involved somehow. There are a lot of Republicans living in my area and as an ex British soldier I will almost certainly have to join the IRA when it comes into existence in the near future or be regarded as a loyalist at best, or a spy at worst. That's enough to get me killed around here. Quite likely I'll be done in by a man whose grandson will be a good friend of mine in 2019. Or by my own grandad or a great uncle. If I survive that war I'll have to pick a side in the Civil War in 1922. Given where I live I have a good chance of going anti-Treaty. Fúck it but there's no end to this shite.

So what's going on with you?
I've also been discharged from the army and I'm looking for work, I see a poster advertising a job with a new fangled organisation nick-named the Black & Tans, they look a bit of a laugh so I'll apply.
See you soon.
 
#6
I have a few pre WW1 photos of my house.

**** all has changed really.

Apart from having less cars and more horses, I imagine my life is pretty similar to be honest. Our farm (and all the others round here) in 1919 is obviously less reliant on machinery, but the general gist of it is much the same. I still shoot in the same places and with the same guns, except they’re new now. There are more pubs in my village in 1919.

Things are probably better truth be told.

View attachment 375992 View attachment 375993 View attachment 375994 View attachment 375995
No Sky dish? Are you poor?
 
#8
If I was here a century ago I would either be a stable hand or lord of the manor (pining away as his son's name has just been carved on the village war memorial).

Either way I would still be bloody freezing and praying for the invention of GCH.

I would watch that cold if I were you!.
 
#9
Living where I live now , I was down pit lad... reserve occupation doncha know...

I longed to escape the colliery to go off and fight with the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) or the Derbyshire Yeomanry but that coal wouldn't have mined itself.

I stayed down pit all my working life and I died of the black lung disease soon after retiring. I couldn't complain though... when I looked at them as suffered the mustard gas and terrible injuries of war. Still, it was the war to end all wars.
 
#10
I’m bloody cold and miserable as they haven’t built my house yet
Lucky me, mines 4 years old and the cast iron range is still fitted so its lovely and warm in here :)
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
I have a few pre WW1 photos of my house.

**** all has changed really.

Apart from having less cars and more horses, I imagine my life is pretty similar to be honest. Our farm (and all the others round here) in 1919 is obviously less reliant on machinery, but the general gist of it is much the same. I still shoot in the same places and with the same guns, except they’re new now. There are more pubs in my village in 1919.

Things are probably better truth be told.

View attachment 375992 View attachment 375993 View attachment 375994 View attachment 375995
A really nice house, what date was it built? At a guess 1625?
 
#13
Home town looked very much the same in 1919, but with sheep walking the streets unmolested, and old store fronts with names like 'Crapita & Sons'. Life wouldn't have been easy for the women and children, since many local boys were wiped out during the Great War - a memorial in a given small Welsh town might have hundreds of names.
And I do know of one man who commuted all the way from Senghenydd to Cardiff Bay, on foot, with a horse-drawn cart of equipment, over the mountain.
 
#14
Britainfromabove is worth a look... my house was part of t'mill grounds
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
Blimey. My house is only 21 years old. It is, though, the livery yard that serves the nearby train station with horse-drawn taxis.

I'm probably shovelling shit, then. Just shit of a different kind.
 
#17
It's 100 years ago and you live where you live right now...
So in my case that would be in a tent, then...?

Edited to add:- Is it a case of it being 100yrs ago and being exactly where we're living right now because, if so, I'm properly stuffed?!

Right now I'm living at 51° 37' 04"N 003° 12' 04"E...
 
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#18
Probably emplyed at the local de Havilland works or the airfield
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or perhaps Airco as they are starting to refurbish war planes for sale and are the largest aircraft factory in the world employing 4,500. My home is on what was then farmland adjacent to the grounds of a house once lived in by Lord Roberts of Khandahar..100 years ago the house was used as a military hospital as were so many large houses.
 
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#19
I have just walked 5 miles from the railway station along roads that are pretty ropey to arrive back at a village with a 14th Century church, a church school, a single pub and quite a few cottages, shops of sorts and at the end of that a blacksmiths workshop and stables. The lunatic who runs the latter has for some reason opened a garage to deal with motor vehicles. Outside of that it's still surrounded by farms, fields and heathland.

Railway has allowed a ready access to much larger markets so quite a lot of the farms are now market gardens with large greenhouses. That's what many of the population used to aspire to, it was better than being put on the fields

It's no longer an entirely remote rural dump but still the sort of place which has little going for it, so after I have spent some time with my family I am thinking of going to join my pal Henry, who tells me that where he lives with his widowed aunt in Brixton is a pleasant up and coming place and really handy for getting a decent job in London and there is loads to do. Unlike here.

Best of all plenty of girls looking for handsome young fellows, especially those like me and Henry who didn't get knocked about. Far fewer of us around these days.
 
#20
I have just walked 5 miles from the railway station along roads that are pretty ropey to arrive back at a village with a 14th Century church, a church school, a single pub and quite a few cottages, shops of sorts and at the end of that a blacksmiths workshop and stables. The lunatic who runs the latter has for some reason opened a garage to deal with motor vehicles. Outside of that it's still surrounded by farms, fields and heathland.

Railway has allowed a ready access to much larger markets so quite a lot of the farms are now market gardens with large greenhouses. That's what many of the population used to aspire to, it was better than being put on the fields

It's no longer an entirely remote rural dump but still the sort of place which has little going for it, so after I have spent some time with my family I am thinking of going to join my pal Henry, who tells me that where he lives with his widowed aunt in Brixton is a pleasant up and coming place and really handy for getting a decent job in London and there is loads to do. Unlike here.

Best of all plenty of girls looking for handsome young fellows, especially those like me and Henry who didn't get knocked about. Far fewer of us around these days.
Motor vehicles? Those will never catch on...
 

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