It was like Zulu

mysteron

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
pegasusbranding said:
By the battle’s end, every man in the platoon was credited with at least one Taliban kill.
Like it matters whether everyone "killed a man". They fought and defended as a team, good leadership at all levels and this action reads as if it reflects the highest standards and traditions of the Army that we are (or at least should be) proud of.
 
#5
Epic.....do you think in 50 year's they'll make movies out of stories like this?

Edit.....just reading that, and I think it reads kind of sarky....not my intention and a genuine question.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
Except for the automatic weapons, and Javellin missiles it was just like Zulu

Well done them
 
#7
mysteron said:
pegasusbranding said:
By the battle’s end, every man in the platoon was credited with at least one Taliban kill.
Like it matters whether everyone "killed a man". They fought and defended as a team, good leadership at all levels and this action reads as if it reflects the highest standards and traditions of the Army that we are (or at least should be) proud of.
I didn't post the quote like a score fixture from a sports event, I posted it to give someone a indication to how intense it would have been for them.
 
#9
redchad said:
The Battalions due back in the UK this spring and will be on Horse Guards parade in June Trooping the Colour.

Proud as punch!
If only they were as good looking as punch (thank you blackadder).

Well done to all involved. Sounds like good skills and drills from everyone involved.
 
#13
petergriffen said:
Epic.....do you think in 50 year's they'll make movies out of stories like this?
I'm still waiting for a proper film about that platoon of marines that defended the Falklands in '82, although An Ungentlemanly Act is well worth a watch, I've read accounts about what they did and it doesn't really do them justice.


Well done to the Guardsmen, nails, as suggested it's a shame things like this don't make the front page...
 
#14
the_boy_syrup said:
Except for the automatic weapons, and Javellin missiles it was just like Zulu

Well done them
And the RPGs and IEDs. Oh, and our use of camouflage and comms and mortars and support.

But apart from that, EXACTLY like zulu
 
#15
Lieutenant Craig Shephard, 24, and Sergeant Dean Bailey, 36, decided to exploit the Taliban’s fondness for attacking wounded soldiers by constructing an ambush based on a fake IED strike. After the explosives were detonated, the Taliban – as expected – quickly appeared with a two-man Pakistani sniper team leading the way. As the British troops pulled back to the base, the Pakistanis were shot dead by hidden British snipers – both dispatched with head shots from 400 metres. When the Taliban pushed forward towards the base, they were cut down by raking machine-gun fire and Javelin missiles. After two hours of fighting, 10 Taliban lay dead.

“The ambush was a case of thinking out of the box,” recalled Lt Shephard. “We wanted to outsmart them by using their tactics. We knew that they would ambush what they thought was an IED attack so we set up a trap.”
Cracking drills.
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#16
No-one can doubt that the Soldiers there displayed great courage, and were a credit to the Army, their Regiment, and both their Queen and Country.

What doesn't come through is the elephant in the room - Why did this action take place? We've been in Helmand for over three years, in Afghanistan for longer, and never in greater numbers (at least probably since the 1890s, anyway) yet there is still a requirement for Platoons to defend FOBs with bayonet and grenade.

I sense a growing realisation that we are not progressing fast, if at all, in Afghanistan, no matter what the Military do.

Politically, this is NOT a 'good news' story, I'm afraid.


But again, well done!
 
#17
OldSnowy said:
No-one can doubt that the Soldiers there displayed great courage, and were a credit to the Army, their Regiment, and both their Queen and Country.

What doesn't come through is the elephant in the room - Why did this action take place? We've been in Helmand for over three years, in Afghanistan for longer, and never in greater numbers (at least probably since the 1890s, anyway) yet there is still a requirement for Platoons to defend FOBs with bayonet and grenade.

I sense a growing realisation that we are not progressing fast, if at all, in Afghanistan, no matter what the Military do.

Politically, this is NOT a 'good news' story, I'm afraid.


But again, well done!
Because that, for the moment, is the British 'ink spot' strategy. By laying chains of FOBs around an area that you want to secure, you clear the area of Taliban (or let them break themselves on your FOBs) before allowing DfID/INGOS into the area once a modicum of security has been established. Once one area is 'safe' and development is under way, you push the FOBs out to a new area and start over.
 
#18
Jungelism said:
Lieutenant Craig Shephard, 24, and Sergeant Dean Bailey, 36, decided to exploit the Taliban’s fondness for attacking wounded soldiers by constructing an ambush based on a fake IED strike. After the explosives were detonated, the Taliban – as expected – quickly appeared with a two-man Pakistani sniper team leading the way. As the British troops pulled back to the base, the Pakistanis were shot dead by hidden British snipers – both dispatched with head shots from 400 metres. When the Taliban pushed forward towards the base, they were cut down by raking machine-gun fire and Javelin missiles. After two hours of fighting, 10 Taliban lay dead.

“The ambush was a case of thinking out of the box,” recalled Lt Shephard. “We wanted to outsmart them by using their tactics. We knew that they would ambush what they thought was an IED attack so we set up a trap.”
Cracking drills.
Quite. It also seems to demonstrate that their co-ordination of where the IED's are isn't that hot. Fine by me.
 
#20
OldSnowy said:
No-one can doubt that the Soldiers there displayed great courage, and were a credit to the Army, their Regiment, and both their Queen and Country.

What doesn't come through is the elephant in the room - Why did this action take place? We've been in Helmand for over three years, in Afghanistan for longer, and never in greater numbers (at least probably since the 1890s, anyway) yet there is still a requirement for Platoons to defend FOBs with bayonet and grenade.

I sense a growing realisation that we are not progressing fast, if at all, in Afghanistan, no matter what the Military do.

Politically, this is NOT a 'good news' story, I'm afraid.


But again, well done!
OS, I realise that you have knowledge of this theatre, but Sean Rayment makes it clear that things have been transformed at the scene of this battle since November, and he ends the piece on a very cautiously optimistic note. Depends which bit you take out of the article, I suppose.

Well done indeed Grenadier Guards Battle Group, I agree.
 

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