It`s True, the Welsh are Dodgy Twats

Probably led by English officers though. The colonials cant be trusted to lead themselves.
Having spent some time on a course with the QDG (top blokes) it’s more a case of disorganisation. Every small thing must be discussed and disputed endlessly with much excitable shouting of “mun” and “but”. Who is going to the NAAFI for tins of pop is a free-for-all discussion that starts at breakfast.
Until they realise, in the time-honoured way, that the most junior arrival does it.
 
At the Berghof, Hitler used to hold fireside talks often, until 2am, he liked to impress his young adjutants. During May 1940 just before the attack in the West, he overheard one young 'thruster' saying 'England won't fight in this war.' Hitler rose his finger for silence and said. '"We at home in 1914 were led to believe that the Englishman was a jolly dandy little chap in tight trousers and a mustache too big for his face, I for one learned to respect him within minutes of meeting him at Messines, just after Christmas 1915. Oh yes! they will fight in this war and they will fight to the death!"
Sadly for the Anglo Saxons on here, the troops that Hitler met that particular day was The Second Bn The Welsh Regt,.... Very dodgy twats indeed!
Because they knew all the had to go back to was f*cking wales
 
... white officers with black privates.
They'd been 'nuggetted'? I understand that really burns on sensitive areas of flesh, so well done them for being the hard men.

 

overopensights

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Probably led by English officers though. The colonials cant be trusted to lead themselves.
Greetings Stacker, take time out to read the history of just one of the 27 or so Battalions of The Royal Welsh Fusiliers'that fought WW1. Then bow your head and shoulders in silent homage!
 
Greetings Stacker, take time out to read the history of just one of the 27 or so Battalions of The Royal Welsh Fusiliers'that fought WW1. Then bow your head and shoulders in silent homage!
There must have been a lot of English officers directing those colonials.
 

overopensights

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overopensights

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Stacker
Just to name a few of the RWF English officers! Siegfried Sassoon (German) Thereafter: Cadogan Jones's, The Llewellyn Rees's, Colenso Jones's and hundreds of other Welsh tribal families. Most English units (Except Guards units) were so short of officers that they created them from the ranks. They would have had none to spare to go to proper Warrior units like the Jocks, The Irish and the Welsh!
 
Stacker
Just to name a few of the RWF English officers! Siegfried Sassoon (German) Thereafter: Cadogan Jones's, The Llewellyn Rees's, Colenso Jones's and hundreds of other Welsh tribal families. Most English units (Except Guards units) were so short of officers that they created them from the ranks. They would have had none to spare to go to proper Warrior units like the Jocks, The Irish and the Welsh!


As was Robert Graves (1895 – 1985)
snip "Robert von Ranke Graves was born in Wimbledon, London. His father was Irish and his mother German (the von Ranke name was to cause suspicion among some of his fellow soldiers that he was a German spy). He volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the First World War, aged 19, and went on to serve as a Captain in the Royal Welch Fusiliers, alongside Siegfried Sassoon, his closest friend during the war years. He was badly wounded at the Somme, and reported dead on his 21st birthday, though recovered enough to return to the front a few months later. He suffered from shell shock, or neurasthenia, for many years after the war and continued to be haunted by traumatic memories of the war until old age. Goodbye To All That (1929) is the most compelling and enduring contemporary prose account of the First World War."
 

overopensights

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As was Robert Graves (1895 – 1985)
snip "Robert von Ranke Graves was born in Wimbledon, London. His father was Irish and his mother German (the von Ranke name was to cause suspicion among some of his fellow soldiers that he was a German spy). He volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the First World War, aged 19, and went on to serve as a Captain in the Royal Welch Fusiliers, alongside Siegfried Sassoon, his closest friend during the war years. He was badly wounded at the Somme, and reported dead on his 21st birthday, though recovered enough to return to the front a few months later. He suffered from shell shock, or neurasthenia, for many years after the war and continued to be haunted by traumatic memories of the war until old age. Goodbye To All That (1929) is the most compelling and enduring contemporary prose account of the First World War."
Greetings Colonial! I knew of Graves and read his book a few times. I didn't mention him to Stacker because Graves sounded too English, Stacker would have jumped onto it! , I visited Graves house in Majorca a few years ago, but I had no idea of his German connection, so thank you for that! I don't know if you have read the book 'Old Soldier's Never Die' by Frank Richards RWF a superb read, apparently the Archives have revealed that Graves had some input into the Grammar of that book?
 

CplFoodspoiler

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As was Robert Graves (1895 – 1985)
snip "Robert von Ranke Graves was born in Wimbledon, London. His father was Irish and his mother German (the von Ranke name was to cause suspicion among some of his fellow soldiers that he was a German spy). He volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the First World War, aged 19, and went on to serve as a Captain in the Royal Welch Fusiliers, alongside Siegfried Sassoon, his closest friend during the war years. He was badly wounded at the Somme, and reported dead on his 21st birthday, though recovered enough to return to the front a few months later. He suffered from shell shock, or neurasthenia, for many years after the war and continued to be haunted by traumatic memories of the war until old age. Goodbye To All That (1929) is the most compelling and enduring contemporary prose account of the First World War."
writers-novella-novel_writing-poet-poets-literature-CC140117_low.jpg
 
Greetings Colonial! I knew of Graves and read his book a few times. I didn't mention him to Stacker because Graves sounded too English, Stacker would have jumped onto it! , I visited Graves house in Majorca a few years ago, but I had no idea of his German connection, so thank you for that! I don't know if you have read the book 'Old Soldier's Never Die' by Frank Richards RWF a superb read, apparently the Archives have revealed that Graves had some input into the Grammar of that book?



My bold … a long time ago.
 
Sadly for the Anglo Saxons on here, the troops that Hitler met that particular day was The Second Bn The Welsh Regt,.... Very dodgy twats indeed!
Bunch of tw@ts should've shot him, it would've saved an awful lot of trouble - bloody Welsh!!:)
 

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