IT Job opportunity....

#1
"We are looking for someone who is passionate about technology

We’re responsible for ‘IT Change’, including the end to end architecture, deployment and maintenance of IT infrastructure technologies across TSB. We’re the first technical point of contact for people in TSB who want to speak to the CIO function. We take business requirements and architect solutions, then work with Sabis UK to input the solution into our data centres.

We provide direction, thought leadership, guidance and subject matter expertise on our IT estate to make sure we get the maximum value from our investment in our IT. We do this by defining our IT strategy and aligning it with Sabadell Group IT, producing TSB technology roadmaps and identifying and recommending IT solution opportunities, supporting business initiatives and ideas, and documenting and managing our architecture assets."

Newsworthy Brit bank TSB is looking for a head of infrastructure


One of your first tasks might be to gently ask why it appears that somebody has ripped off Netflix load balancer code and lashed it into an online banking App...

IMG_20180429_075531.jpg
 
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#2
Ahhh it gets better:

From BBC's Business Live feed:

"Before TSB entered its week of computer chaos, it could have done with some advice from a man once described as an “integration guru” in a national newspaper.

That man led the integration of Bradford & Bingley with Abbey and Alliance & Leicester a few years ago, including migrating thousands of customers to a single computer system.

Indeed the "guru" presumably learned some lessons from what was a pretty challenging experience, prompting years of customer complaints.

Who was he? Step forward Paul Pester, current chief executive at TSB who has been criticised for fumbling the ball over this week's IT disaster."
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#3
Ahhh it gets better:

From BBC's Business Live feed:

"Before TSB entered its week of computer chaos, it could have done with some advice from a man once described as an “integration guru” in a national newspaper.

That man led the integration of Bradford & Bingley with Abbey and Alliance & Leicester a few years ago, including migrating thousands of customers to a single computer system.

Indeed the "guru" presumably learned some lessons from what was a pretty challenging experience, prompting years of customer complaints.

Who was he? Step forward Paul Pester, current chief executive at TSB who has been criticised for fumbling the ball over this week's IT disaster."
They'd have done better to take advice from The Emperor.
 
#4
Do not worry my friend. Our team of damned jolly fine experts are on their way at high, high speed. We guarantee that all of them can speak Hindi and operate a telephone and that none of them will use your waste paper basket as a toilet.

 
#5
They'd have done better to take advice from The Emperor.
Well credit where credit is due. And a lot of that actually seems to belong here:

Home SABIS

That's the IT "partner" of Sabadell Bank, the parent of TSB thanks to the EU requiring Lloyds to ditch it.

Some interesting if depressing chatter on the IT Nerd forums. One former contractor alleges that the testing phase had some errr unconventional available outcomes:

1. Pass.

2. Pass with qualification.

There was no "Fail" option. That was not available as being "too negative."

Thus the management chain was probably only hearing happy things.

TSB man Paul Pester too smart and to have
made shit up and tell the world all was well when it patently was not and walked into day after day of PR disaster so probably being fed Spanish bullshit.
 
#6
The whole TSB fiasco was 100% predictable, and 100% their own fault imho.
The same goes for any other bank that has had issues.
With the bespoke systems used by UK banks the banks getting rid of their experienced software people and outsourcing to developers outside the UK who have failed spectacularly for a number of years to get things right wasnt ever going to end well.
Add to that the fact that UK specific bank software experts refused to return to employers who had made them redundant and again it shows the spupidity of shiny arrses who know the cost of everything but value of nothing.
 
#10
The whole TSB fiasco was 100% predictable, and 100% their own fault imho.
The same goes for any other bank that has had issues.
With the bespoke systems used by UK banks the banks getting rid of their experienced software people and outsourcing to developers outside the UK who have failed spectacularly for a number of years to get things right wasnt ever going to end well.
Add to that the fact that UK specific bank software experts refused to return to employers who had made them redundant and again it shows the spupidity of shiny arrses who know the cost of everything but value of nothing.
Never mind the quality. Feel the width.

Businesses were royally shafted by IT staff during the dot com boom and the millennium bug panic. Part of the response to this was to diversify their IT operations into cheaper parts of the world.

Enter the Indian IT contractor. A graduate software developer starting from £6,000 per year. Even better, many of the Indian outsourcing companies had a "dispensation" from the ever generous Inland Revenue such that their staff paid neither income tax nor national insurance once their salary rose above the single persons allowance. Their employers were also exempt from employers' national insurance payments.

Doubles all round as CTOs saw their wage bills drop by 90%.

Unfortunately, £6k a year isn't enough to live off in the UK so the only people they could get were brand new graduates who were able and willing effectively to work as unpaid interns. Fine if you're looking for graduate apprentices as Indian grads are often very good. Not fine if you need complex software written for Unix clusters. Indian grads often get taught only using PCs. They might be masters of Java polymorphism and multiple inheritance but that's not much use if they dont know what ls and cd mean.

Add to that a whole host of other problems like:-

Employers facing prosecution because the Indian agency used tourist visas to get their staff in to the UK to save money.

Indian managers seriously assaulting UK staff because "that's how we do it in India."

Indian staff pi$$ing and sh!tting everywhere except the toilet.

In one case I am aware of, a newly arrived but obviously unwell Indian taking out an entire development team by infecting them with what he had. I think it was tuberculosis.

Fortunately, the government now sets a minimum salary for imported IT workers at £40k. You can live like a maharajah for £40k in India so it looks like the days of the outsourced, insourced and exploited Indian IT worker are over.
 
#11
Never mind the quality. Feel the width.

Businesses were royally shafted by IT staff during the dot com boom and the millennium bug panic. Part of the response to this was to diversify their IT operations into cheaper parts of the world.

Enter the Indian IT contractor. A graduate software developer starting from £6,000 per year. Even better, many of the Indian outsourcing companies had a "dispensation" from the ever generous Inland Revenue such that their staff paid neither income tax nor national insurance once their salary rose above the single persons allowance. Their employers were also exempt from employers' national insurance payments.

Doubles all round as CTOs saw their wage bills drop by 90%.

Unfortunately, £6k a year isn't enough to live off in the UK so the only people they could get were brand new graduates who were able and willing effectively to work as unpaid interns. Fine if you're looking for graduate apprentices as Indian grads are often very good. Not fine if you need complex software written for Unix clusters. Indian grads often get taught only using PCs. They might be masters of Java polymorphism and multiple inheritance but that's not much use if they dont know what ls and cd mean.

Add to that a whole host of other problems like:-

Employers facing prosecution because the Indian agency used tourist visas to get their staff in to the UK to save money.

Indian managers seriously assaulting UK staff because "that's how we do it in India."

Indian staff pi$$ing and sh!tting everywhere except the toilet.

In one case I am aware of, a newly arrived but obviously unwell Indian taking out an entire development team by infecting them with what he had. I think it was tuberculosis.

Fortunately, the government now sets a minimum salary for imported IT workers at £40k. You can live like a maharajah for £40k in India so it looks like the days of the outsourced, insourced and exploited Indian IT worker are over.
None of the above has anything to do with the TSB issue though.
The problem can't be solved by throwing any amount of money at it now, the issue was that the ANY developers outside of the UK banking software scene didn't know the UK banking software.
We would be in exactly the same position if UK, US or European developers had been hired on proper wages, they just wouldn't know the software.

This latest scenario was pointed out to me in precise and exact detail a few years ago. It was known it was going to happen and why it would happen.


Edited to add:
Do you have a link for the £40.000 figure?
I know of plenty UK born or overseas born software developers working in the IK for less than that figure.
 
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#12
Genuine question:

From somone involved in software intensive programmes, what does developing this type of software and integrating it into operations involve?

I understand that it is millions of lines of code and lots of integration challenges both in terms of bringing together code developed by different teams around the world, and bringing together software with hardware systems. But I would have thought that there would be a test &reference centre somewhere, and that each module would have been tested to exhaustion?
 

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