"It is lawful to ban crucifixes..."

#1
#2
If there is a policy of NO religious symbols, then okay. But if Sikhs are allowed theirs, turbans ect, and moslems are allowed headscarfs or even druids are allowed to carry mistletoe, then it's wrong.
 
#3
Just another crazy example of how we have pc rules about accepting and embracing cultural diversity,but are unable to display our own religious beliefs for fear of upsetting some crazy, left-wing, Guardian reading w@nksplash. It's these people that fuel intollerance and hatred not people ofother faiths.
 
#5
Plant-Pilot said:
If there is a policy of NO religious symbols, then okay. But if Sikhs are allowed theirs, turbans ect, and moslems are allowed headscarfs or even druids are allowed to carry mistletoe, then it's wrong.
Couldn't agree more. Btw, Anglican Church is an official, state Church (at least in England). This PC could engourage those who were born outside the UK to demand to change first word in phrase 'God save the Queen'. Further, one could expect demands to change English flag (because of cross).

http://www.mosnews.com/news/2005/12/06/muslimsigns.shtml

A group of top Muslim clerics have demanded that Orthodox Christian symbols be removed from the Russian coat of arms


Group of 'atheists' recently demanded to change Russian national anthem. They don't like this phrase

'Guarded by God our land'.

...

Today I have seen report on TV about few Sikhs. They live in Kaluga region in rural area, grow cows (200). They are religious but don't wear turbans because of severe climate.
 
#6
This is a big issue in the US at the moment too. An atheist is calling for the words "in god we trust" to be removed from the back of dollar bills and off of pubic buildings.

Also there's the save Christmas campaign being pushed by the Murdoch media in the US and UK.
 
#7
Was the girl in question sporting said locket as a fashion statement or was it a piece of jewelry she was wearing as a mark of respect to her religion?
I hear that she was wearing it as a fashion item rather than the latter. Sikhs take their religion far more seriously and as such are taken more seriously.
Having said that, what's sauce for the gander....or whatever....
 
#8
The rule was NO OPTIONAL JEWELLERY not NO RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS, if the sprog in question was Required to wear a crucifix then she would be allowed to. The issue was most likely not one of religion or PC but one of health and safety or enforcement of school rules, it has been made into a religious issue by those with an axe to grind.
I doubt that anyone would have noticed she was wearing a crucifix unless she was wearing it over her clothes which means that she was probably trying to pick a fight with the school over it. After all you could wear just about anything under a school uniform and not have it noticed, I went to school with a boy who regularly wore a T-shirt emblazoned with "Mr X is a F@(king Knobhead" under his shirt.
 
#9
What about votive medals then? RC's wear crucifixes and a variety of medals as symbols of their special intentions - they are not "optional jewellery" but they will be portrayed as such by hard line Anglicans (fortunately not much of that lot left!) and other disinterested (in christianity) parties.

I always wore my sacred heart medal on ops and it gave me considerable comfort. Although the fact I had to wear it suspended somewhere near my navel to avoid messing with dress codes caused me some discomfort too! Of course if I had thought about it I could have just joined Opus Dei and scored some brownie points...
 
#10
It just serves to give more ammunition to the extremists....lets stop this PC pandering and respect religions or beliefs, whatever they may be. Honestly, this country is in the process of becoming a very unpleasant place to live.
 
#11
This happened to my daughter in a service school in Cyprus (St Johns, Epi) about 3 yrs ago.

The deputy head tried to confiscate my daughters cross she refused to take it of so I was summoned in to school to support there decision, them stating it was for health & safety reasons. They were totally horrified when I support my daughter & stated that she would continue to wear it & that if necessary then I would take it further.

When asked to whom, them thinking smugly the school governors I stated the UK national press, she was never asked to take it of again.
 
#12
PsyWar.Org said:
This is a big issue in the US at the moment too. An atheist is calling for the words "in god we trust" to be removed from the back of dollar bills and off of pubic buildings.

Also there's the save Christmas campaign being pushed by the Murdoch media in the US and UK.
It may seem trivial on the surface to be making such a fuss but if you look at the underlining current it does go a bit deeper. The ACLU is heavily involved in this mess and support rights for organizations such as NAMBLA, and other things such as covering the statue of Mary with poop and calling it art, but will be quick to burn you down for volunteerily saying the Pledge or Merry Christmas.

Here are a couple of good reads:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177689,00.html (Jackie Mason) Leave it to him to make his point in such a "poignant" way

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177788,00.html

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177670,00.html

Are there the same issues in the UK?

V/R
MTAB
 
#13
Married_to_a_Brit said:
Here are a couple of good reads:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177689,00.html (Jackie Mason) Leave it to him to make his point in such a "poignant" way

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177788,00.html

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,177670,00.html

Are there the same issues in the UK?

V/R
MTAB
IMHO, Bill O'Reilly is a professional alarmist on the Murdoch payroll. There is no insidious nationwide conspiracy to cancel Christmas in the U.S., I'm afraid (retailers make way too much money on it to p!ss off the Christian majority!) but it sure does make for good press. :)
 
#14
well add to this the ban on christmas in Bradford and Leeds....

well i am pig sick and i am so angry with the government.

am all for respecting other cultures and sh1t but why cant they all respect ours? surely this is an issue of new comers respecting the wishes and beliefs of thier chosen host nation?

wonder what would happen if i moved to iran, wore a santa suit and said they had to stop ramadan as i found it offensive? bet i would get my arm cut off quicker than you can say "i say, is that blade sterile?"

i am telling you - this country has gone to the dogs....

Last one out turn off the light.

Rincewind
 
#15
The girl in question was on the local radio last night, she has apparently been wearing the crucifix for more than five years, normally concealed under her school blouse, apparently the blouse got wet so she went to change into a T shirt, when she came back a teacher spotted that she was wearing jewelry, the teacher asked her to remove it, the girl duly removed a necklace she was wearing but refused to remove the cricifix, she stated that she wouldn't feel right without it and told the teacher that if the Sikh's were allowed to wear their wrist bands why can't i wear my crucifix. She was suspended but has since returned to School.

It seems to me that the whole country is going mad, whilst i can appreciate that there may be a health and safety issue why is it that the policy is not applied to everyone?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#16
Wingman said:
...She was suspended but has since returned to School.

...
I'm normally against this 'compensation culture' idiocy but it is a double edged sword.
The parents should hit the school board where it hurts and get a load of dosh from them for suspending the girl - then they might think twice about double standards when appying ther H&S rules.
 
#17
Cuddles said:
What about votive medals then? RC's wear crucifixes and a variety of medals as symbols of their special intentions - they are not "optional jewellery" but they will be portrayed as such by hard line Anglicans (fortunately not much of that lot left!) and other disinterested (in christianity) parties.

I always wore my sacred heart medal on ops and it gave me considerable comfort. Although the fact I had to wear it suspended somewhere near my navel to avoid messing with dress codes caused me some discomfort too! Of course if I had thought about it I could have just joined Opus Dei and scored some brownie points...
I understand that this girl may wish to wear a crucifix, but apparently she does not take her attachment to Christianity so far as to attend church, prayer group.

On a side issue I had not realised that votive medals were a requirement of Catholicism I thought they were something wrong to show intention but not compulsory....am I wrong?

Practising Sikhs, Jews and Moslems have forms of dress that are required by religion. Christianity does not. It is unfortunate that this is seen as an attack on Christianity. Frankly 'we' Christians are our own worst enemies...we have decided not to attend church because it doesn't suit us - for a variety of reasons. In the US vast swathes of the population are regular church goers and as such have a far stronger case when they say the USA is a Christian country...I am not sure that with attendence in churches (of all denominations) declining in the UK it is fair to say that the UK is Christian...the UK is secular and has a value system based on Judao Christain ideologies.
 
#19
Cutaway said:
Wingman said:
...She was suspended but has since returned to School.

...
I'm normally against this 'compensation culture' idiocy but it is a double edged sword.
The parents should hit the school board where it hurts and get a load of dosh from them for suspending the girl - then they might think twice about double standards when appying ther H&S rules.
As much as I would hate to see the UK become as sue-happy as my country of origin...I think you're absolutely right. Having to pay out a big fat claim may prompt some honest dialogue about how most people really feel about these kinds of rules, no matter what religion or ethnicity.

I honestly don't know anyone of non-Christian faith that gives a rat's ARRSE about Christian religious symbols as long as they're not being preached at, but maybe I'm in the minority. So to speak.

Yes, there is a difference between "required" and "desired," but it's a very fine line when it comes to something as sticky as religion, and I for one would hate to be the person that has to rule on it. :?
 
#20
Saw her on Sky News, she was wearing it on the outside FFS, it was halfway down her front. Why didn't she just tuck it in then she could still feel 'close to Jesus'.
 

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