Isometrics

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by sandmanfez, Mar 6, 2006.

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  1. I have a training regime that includes running, and swimming for stamina, various exotic stretching techniques to stay supple, and a set of free weights for strength training.
    Unfortunately, my lifestyle keeps me on the move, and I like to travel light.
    My question is, can I abandon my weights and rely on Isometric exercises to maintain my strength? I dont want to increase my muscle mass, I'm wiry, it suits me and I want to stay that way.
    There is always the option of press-ups, sit-ups etc, which I do, but I am interested in Isometrics as I understand that there are exercises I can carry out throughout the day whether its for 10 seconds in a lift, or 10 hours stuck on a plane.
    Any insights will be gratefully received,

    Cheers

    sandy
     
  2. No idea what isometrics is but if you want some "Jail house" exercise go to

    http://www.mattfurey.com

    He does alot of body weight exercising which can be done any where, three in particular

    If you're foolish enough to sign on to his news letter you get a regular email telling you what a "Pussy" you are and how to improve your hardness!!

    Not everyones cup of tea but I've seen a big american shed a lot of weight, and get fit in a month foolowing this excercise plan while living in a caravan in Siberia!!!!!!!!!!

    Toodlepip
    TheGimp
     
  3. I have used Isometrics and also know a couple of other people who have used them even more (including one Kung Fu instructor who had good results from using Isometrics exclusively for his strength training - not too much bulk but great strength and definition). Personally I find Isometrics can be a help to maintain strength and muscle tone for periods while I am travelling and cannot get to do weight training.

    Personally I could not recommend it for anything more than a substitute for other strength training a few days at stretch. Tht is because in my case I find it boring as sh1t and could not maintain the self discipline to keep at it. With weights or say press ups the motivation comes from working to add another small weight disk or get an extra rep. With Isometrics there is not that measure of progress and for me at last that makes it real struggle to keep motivated.

    Another drawback is Isometrics does not train over a full range of muscle movement.

    My summary - much better than nothing and I think it can work if you stick at it but I couldn't stick at it for long.
     
  4. My feelings of isometrics are that, they are good for rehab etc, but as one of the main principles of training suggests. Training must be Specific to the activity/sport/goal thats u wish to achieve. also second whats already been said.
     
  5. Absolutely acho spinderalla, your training has to be sport/event/goal specific otherwise i doesn't matter how much you do, if its not designed to improve your goals then it won't really, or at least, it will have very limited results. Isometric training is incredibly versatile, and there is no end to the variations you can do, it's got shed loads of benefits. My tutor is an exercise kenesiologist who absolutely detests free/resistance weight training and just uses isometric and core work. The guy is an absolute powerhouse, Ive never seen such a functional, effective body. There isn't anything he can't do. And ALL he does is isomtric training. It's awesome, and I was certainly inspired to introduce it to my training, however, it has a limited place because of the sport I do. However, it does have drawbacks, some of which have already been mentioned. If you have high blood pressure then stay well clear. It drastically raises the blood pressure and is therefore high risk. An absolute no no. Try it, see how you get on. There is loads of info on the net. Or you could have a chat to a Personal Trainer or something.
     
  6. Thanks for the feedback everyone, I dont have any specific goal, I'm an allrounder not a specialist, if I do have a goal, its merely to maintain my physical status quo.
    I found my ideal balance of weight/muscle mass when I was 25 and have maintained it for 14 years. I seem to recall reading about USAF POWs in Vietnam using isometrics to stay in shape whilst imprisoned. IIRC USAF pilots still use the technique to maintain muscle tone.
     
  7. Hopefully along the same lines but has anyone figured out an exercising programme that can be carried out when commuting by car? Figured out various exercises myself but wondered if there are some isometric type tips that someone may know of.