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Isle of Wight Tanker "Hijacked" 25/10/20

He was docked in frigate alley (Devonport Dockyard) and the ship he was on carried out an 'Op Awkward'.
Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) team ran out of blank ammo- such was the excitment and willingness to play.

Having being a lesser PWO (principal war officer)...namely a PWO(C).. It is hard for me to fathom exactly what role Guns would have had taken in such an exercise apart from...that of a spectator - for that is essentially what a PWO(C) does :)
Perhaps in Cantonese would be better?
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
Up to the point where they shoot you in the head and ease you over the rail for the hammerheads,makoes and whitetips who have followed you patiently from Lagos, quietly salivating.....
A very plausible fear. I guess the advantage for would be immigrants of using professional people smugglers is that they have a business reputation to protect, whereas sailors might see this as a one off lottery win.

We may not be looking at a ship being hijacked, but the result of the migrants fighting back when their supposed protectors tuned nasty. Perhaps having reached sight of the UK the penny dropped that there was no actual plan to get them ashore. That is until the HM Government laid on an armed escort and VIP travel.

I fond it hard to believe that half a dozen migrants could hide on a ship for weeks without some help. Is there any evidence that they were armed?

I wonder what actually happened. We may find out when and if there is a trial.
 
A very plausible fear. I guess the advantage for would be immigrants of using professional people smugglers is that they have a business reputation to protect, whereas sailors might see this as a one off lottery win.

We may not be looking at a ship being hijacked, but the result of the migrants fighting back when their supposed protectors tuned nasty. Perhaps having reached sight of the UK the penny dropped that there was no actual plan to get them ashore. That is until the HM Government laid on an armed escort and VIP travel.

I fond it hard to believe that half a dozen migrants could hide on a ship for weeks without some help. Is there any evidence that they were armed?

I wonder what actually happened. We may find out when and if there is a trial.


I thought that I had read that the ship had stopped off twice in port the last one being St Nazaire (France) maybe the Calais squatters / people smugglers have moved to a different route to the UK what with the onslaught of winter weather in the channel.

Archie
 
Won’t be long now before we’ll all be regaling stories on being on the Isle of Wight Tanker in the middle of a Covid Emergency in the Autumn of 2020

View attachment 515368
That is me there

D9455262-E8F4-49B7-A263-512D3184383C.jpeg
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
I thought that I had read that the ship had stopped off twice in port the last one being St Nazaire (France) maybe the Calais squatters / people smugglers have moved to a different route to the UK what with the onslaught of winter weather in the channel.

Archie
Maybe but the men, all Nigerians, are more likely to have joined the ship in Lagos. According to the NCA people smugglers charge £12,000 a head to get someone across the channel. That is in addition to what they might have paid to get to Calais. International sailors are not particularly well paid. Seven times whatever fraction or multiple of £12,000 might be a tempting side-line.
 
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Everyone knows oil tankers are dry! You were drinking pink lemonade weren’t you!

Bulk Carriers weren't.

One of the few times I actually set foot on a big vessel was when I was invited to cast an eye over the
original MV Maria Topic. The Croatian master had a bottle of wine placed in front of each officer and guest, which was replaced by another which was replaced by Slibovitz .
The subsequent tour of the engine room was a trial.
 
Bulk Carriers weren't.

One of the few times I actually set foot on a big vessel was when I was invited to cast an eye over the
original MV Maria Topic. The Croatian master had a bottle of wine placed in front of each officer and guest, which was replaced by another which was replaced by Slibovitz .
The subsequent tour of the engine room was a trial.
You do realise I was being sarky don’t ya?
 

merchantman

War Hero
Most ships are dry or have very limited amounts of booze on board these days. In the good old days we had bars on board and could party to our hearts content as long as we were able to turn to when required. Not so much these days, on some ships the crew are not even allowed to go ashore for a beer their employment contracts provide for no booze throughout the trip. The limits for the UK are hidden away in the Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003, which provides that:

78Professional staff on duty​

(1)This section applies to—

(a)a professional master of a ship,

(b)a professional pilot of a ship, and

(c)a professional seaman in a ship while on duty.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to carry out his duties is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a master, pilot or seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as master, pilot or seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to carry out duties on a fishing vessel, it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to carry out his duties.

79Professional staff off duty​

(1)This section applies to a professional seaman in a ship at a time when—

(a)he is not on duty, but

(b)in the event of an emergency he would or might be required by the nature or terms of his engagement or employment to take action to protect the safety of passengers.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to take the action mentioned in subsection (1)(b) is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to take action it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to take the action.

The limits are also quite low:

81Prescribed limit​

(1)The prescribed limit of alcohol for the purposes of this Part is—

(a)in the case of breath, [F125] microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres,

(b)in the case of blood, [F250] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres, and

(c)in the case of urine, [F367] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres.

(2)The Secretary of State may make regulations amending subsection (1).

Amendment of prescribed limit​

2.—(1) In section 81 of the Act (prescribed limit), subsection (1) is amended as follows.

(2) In paragraph (a) for “35” substitute “25”.

(3) In paragraph (b) for “80” substitute “50”.

(4) In paragraph (c) for “107” substitute “67”.
 
Most ships are dry or have very limited amounts of booze on board these days. In the good old days we had bars on board and could party to our hearts content as long as we were able to turn to when required. Not so much these days, on some ships the crew are not even allowed to go ashore for a beer their employment contracts provide for no booze throughout the trip. The limits for the UK are hidden away in the Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003, which provides that:

78Professional staff on duty​

(1)This section applies to—

(a)a professional master of a ship,

(b)a professional pilot of a ship, and

(c)a professional seaman in a ship while on duty.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to carry out his duties is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a master, pilot or seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as master, pilot or seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to carry out duties on a fishing vessel, it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to carry out his duties.

79Professional staff off duty​

(1)This section applies to a professional seaman in a ship at a time when—

(a)he is not on duty, but

(b)in the event of an emergency he would or might be required by the nature or terms of his engagement or employment to take action to protect the safety of passengers.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to take the action mentioned in subsection (1)(b) is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to take action it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to take the action.

The limits are also quite low:

81Prescribed limit​

(1)The prescribed limit of alcohol for the purposes of this Part is—

(a)in the case of breath, [F125] microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres,

(b)in the case of blood, [F250] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres, and

(c)in the case of urine, [F367] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres.

(2)The Secretary of State may make regulations amending subsection (1).

Amendment of prescribed limit​

2.—(1) In section 81 of the Act (prescribed limit), subsection (1) is amended as follows.

(2) In paragraph (a) for “35” substitute “25”.

(3) In paragraph (b) for “80” substitute “50”.

(4) In paragraph (c) for “107” substitute “67”.
Discussing this with a mate of mine. His ship is bone dry, down to the mouthwash, hand sanitiser and solvents in the engine room.
 
Most ships are dry or have very limited amounts of booze on board these days. In the good old days we had bars on board and could party to our hearts content as long as we were able to turn to when required. Not so much these days, on some ships the crew are not even allowed to go ashore for a beer their employment contracts provide for no booze throughout the trip. The limits for the UK are hidden away in the Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003, which provides that:

78Professional staff on duty​

(1)This section applies to—

(a)a professional master of a ship,

(b)a professional pilot of a ship, and

(c)a professional seaman in a ship while on duty.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to carry out his duties is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a master, pilot or seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as master, pilot or seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to carry out duties on a fishing vessel, it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to carry out his duties.

79Professional staff off duty​

(1)This section applies to a professional seaman in a ship at a time when—

(a)he is not on duty, but

(b)in the event of an emergency he would or might be required by the nature or terms of his engagement or employment to take action to protect the safety of passengers.

(2)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if his ability to take the action mentioned in subsection (1)(b) is impaired because of drink or drugs.

(3)A person to whom this section applies commits an offence if the proportion of alcohol in his breath, blood or urine exceeds the prescribed limit.

(4)For the purposes of this section a seaman is professional if (and only if) he acts as seaman in the course of a business or employment.

(5)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section in respect of the effect of a drug on his ability to take action it is a defence for him to show that—

(a)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose on, and in accordance with, medical advice, or

(b)he took the drug for a medicinal purpose and had no reason to believe that it would impair his ability to take the action.

The limits are also quite low:

81Prescribed limit​

(1)The prescribed limit of alcohol for the purposes of this Part is—

(a)in the case of breath, [F125] microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres,

(b)in the case of blood, [F250] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres, and

(c)in the case of urine, [F367] milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres.

(2)The Secretary of State may make regulations amending subsection (1).

Amendment of prescribed limit​

2.—(1) In section 81 of the Act (prescribed limit), subsection (1) is amended as follows.

(2) In paragraph (a) for “35” substitute “25”.

(3) In paragraph (b) for “80” substitute “50”.

(4) In paragraph (c) for “107” substitute “67”.
Thanks, I really was having trouble sleeping until you posted that! Have you thought about bringing out a dvd?
“Curing Sleeping Disorders for Drunks & Sailors” perhaps, by @merchantman ?
You’d make a fortune, seriously, I’d buy it.
 

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