Is your AR unit fit for purpose

For RAOL/FTRS how long can you be out of the Military to apply or do you have to be in the Reserves to apply?
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
I thought that you were minted? In all seriousness though, what took the hit? Salary, career progression, accreditation?
Salary and career progression. I went for an s-type during a market downturn when jobs were scarce, and stayed on for FTRS for another 3 years. I subsequently mobilised again (5 years later) so have covered the full range of options!

My S type took me down to just over 1/3 of my previous salary, no regrets. I rejoined my previous career after 4 years out at the exact same salary point as I left it.

I am definitely behind my peer group by at least one promotion and salary increment.

Everyone says great things about the transferable skills and experience, but I am now looking old for the roles I am going for and the unasked question is why are you behind the curve.
 

Yokel

LE
As a dark blue Reservist, my personal bugbear has been the FTRS policy making ttpes, who have used FTRS and being in the clique as a career. The trouble is that:

1. They lose contact with civilian employment and the way most Reservists have to juggle commitments.

2. Except for the few ex regular, they do not have the career broadening experience and service knowledge. This is reflected in the policies and decisions made at HQ level. Nor do they have experience of dealing with people with personal issues.

3. Their behaviour can be toxic without checks and balances.
 
So what’s the point of being in the reserve if it’s all to difficult?
This is where the gemeinschaft (community centric)/gesellschaft (organisation centric) categorisation helps to understand the differing views.

The Civilian viewpoint is predominantly Gemeinschaft, through which volunteer activity, or doing more is generally seen positively ("how do they do that?", "rather them than me") - hence the "Twice the citizen" comment from WSC.
There is less movement physically, rather a growth in situ of social or community stature, by the extra responsibility to others taken on.

The Military viewpoint is predominantly Gesellschaft, through which an organisation selects in its adherents by their efforts/sacrifices/competition. Part timers or those whose commitment is not as absolute as the group collective are therefore seen as deficient or lacking as a default, though individual exceptions are made for those who are seen to have passed a test or threshold. ("hobbyist", "he's okay for a STAB, almost like a real soldier" etc
The movement is physically away from a community and the social growth is a re-write of the individuals personal status to a newer one within the organisation.

The Military, having generally internalised their personal sacrifices and thresholds, tends to take a more basic transactional shallow scrape at what the reservists are getting (money, kit, equipment), whereas the reservist, very acutely aware of what he is leaving at home/work, tends to look at other things( Time lost, experience gained, ROI)

Some of the issues explored further here P.12(128)
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14702436.2016.1163225
 
As a dark blue Reservist, my personal bugbear has been the FTRS policy making ttpes, who have used FTRS and being in the clique as a career. The trouble is that:

1. They lose contact with civilian employment and the way most Reservists have to juggle commitments.

2. Except for the few ex regular, they do not have the career broadening experience and service knowledge. This is reflected in the policies and decisions made at HQ level. Nor do they have experience of dealing with people with personal issues.

3. Their behaviour can be toxic without checks and balances.
FTRS usage was a knee jerk reaction to the "outrage" 10 years ago about using contractors too much.
Most of these contractors were ex or recently ex mil and through interim professional providers like SCS (now Cohort plc), paid a proportion of the capitation that their post was allocated.
Picked up a good mix of people, mostly on the younger side of crusty and was a reasonable alternative to crunchy civvy jobs.
the FTRS dynamic was that it wasn't... contracts took too long to get done and then took people in who often weren't in the class/running for good civvie role. quality changed and also breadth of appeal, as FTRS had knock on pension impacts, which wasn't everyones cup of tea.
 
Salary and career progression. I went for an s-type during a market downturn when jobs were scarce, and stayed on for FTRS for another 3 years. I subsequently mobilised again (5 years later) so have covered the full range of options!

My S type took me down to just over 1/3 of my previous salary, no regrets. I rejoined my previous career after 4 years out at the exact same salary point as I left it.

I am definitely behind my peer group by at least one promotion and salary increment.

Everyone says great things about the transferable skills and experience, but I am now looking old for the roles I am going for and the unasked question is why are you behind the curve.
So you did it on your terms, when it suited you, for a fixed period to suit your immediate needs. Twice the citizen. Thank you for your service. Sorry it’s held you back.
The sacrifices we make, eh, like my 1500 LSA days (not incl the 2 tours I did in my first 3 yrs).
 
No. It is entirely voluntary. You are removed from the reserve establishment and added to the regular one under an “S Type” engagement.

You are not mobilised, and therefore have none of the protections of being mobilised.
Semantics. I meant mobilisation in the broadest sense, not legal sense, ie, being attached to a regular unit for a specific period of time for a particular role.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
So what’s the point of being in the reserve if it’s all to difficult?
The point is the army (regular) doesn't understand the sacrifices volunteers make to serve their country. Appreciation would be a good start but less ******* around would be good too! I recall a certain annual camp where pay parade was held one evening after training ended! The grown ups demanded everyone wore uniform, ffs when we still did pay parade as regs it was in whatever dress we were wearing at the time, off duty turn up in civvies and get paid!
Nope the stab snco's wanted us to play at being soldiers! I told them to send me a cheque and went to the naafi
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Answered suitably by the duke
I hadn't met any TA serving with regulars until a youngster from 15 Para deployed with a reg para bn, we had done scbc together so I had a good idea of how good he was and frankly he was good enough. He deployed as a team leader and was thoroughly enjoying the NITAT when I caught up with him!
 
The point is the army (regular) doesn't understand the sacrifices volunteers make to serve their country. Appreciation would be a good start but less ******* around would be good too! I recall a certain annual camp where pay parade was held one evening after training ended! The grown ups demanded everyone wore uniform, ffs when we still did pay parade as regs it was in whatever dress we were wearing at the time, off duty turn up in civvies and get paid!
Nope the stab snco's wanted us to play at being soldiers! I told them to send me a cheque and went to the naafi
I do appreciate the one six month tour in 64 yrs combined service as per aforementioned picture.
 
Plenty of tour dodging regulars around
Don’t doubt it. But the reserve exists specifically for operational augmentation. Hardly a great advert for the utility of the organisation when the professional head of the Army Reserve has never been on an op tour.
 
I hadn't met any TA serving with regulars until a youngster from 15 Para deployed with a reg para bn, we had done scbc together so I had a good idea of how good he was and frankly he was good enough. He deployed as a team leader and was thoroughly enjoying the NITAT when I caught up with him!
PM me a name.
 
Don’t doubt it. But the reserve exists specifically for operational augmentation. Hardly a great advert for the utility of the organisation when the professional head of the Army Reserve has never been on an op tour.
No.
Strategic reserve, not operational reserve.
If you change the result wanted without changing the laws, stop whining when it doesn't work out.
Stamping your feet and making sh1t up may work in the echo chamber.
If you are still serving/within the institution, have the courtesy to understand there is a whole world outside that may come as a bit of a shock

You also avoided mention of 2 separate civilian careers and families.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
So you did it on your terms, when it suited you, for a fixed period to suit your immediate needs. Twice the citizen. Thank you for your service. Sorry it’s held you back.
The sacrifices we make, eh, like my 1500 LSA days (not incl the 2 tours I did in my first 3 yrs).
Quite angry, aren’t you? I have no regrets about what I did, why, or the implications of doing so. I answered a question about the impact of doing so.

(I think I am around 650, but haven’t looked at a pay slip for some time).
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Don’t doubt it. But the reserve exists specifically for operational augmentation. Hardly a great advert for the utility of the organisation when the professional head of the Army Reserve has never been on an op tour.
Can you honestly imagine a role he could have filled on ops since Labours away days started?
 

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