Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Is this a Retention deal for you?

QRK2

LE
I always enjoy Wavell Room articles in which career officers share their wisdom about the civilian job market



That is exactly how it is in the civilian world. It's very unusual for the head of a generic support function such as HR, IT, Legal and so on to make it to CEO. The one exception being the head accountant, the CFO.

It seems to vary by geography though. In the UK the tendency is, as you say, for an accountant to be the top man, the US seems to favour legal types and in Germany it is often engineers.

The depth of lack understanding of business in the regular army officer corps is rarely underestimated, exacerbated by a complete unawareness of how wrong they are.
 
Last edited:

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
It seems to vary by geography though. In the UK the tendency is, as you say for an accountant to be the top man, the US seems to favour legal types and in Germany it is often engineers.

The depth of lack understanding of business in the regular army officer corps is rarely underestimated, exacerbated by a complete unawareness of how wrong they are.
In that case they are perfect material for posts in senior management at the BBC.
 

Bob65

War Hero
In that case they are perfect material for posts in senior management at the BBC.

Also while I am here: the companies that promote the fluffiest image to the outside world are invariably the most viciously political on the inside - something else of which our author seems blissfully unaware
 
I always enjoy Wavell Room articles in which career officers share their wisdom about the civilian job market



That is exactly how it is in the civilian world. It's very unusual for the head of a generic support function such as HR, IT, Legal and so on to make it to CEO. The one exception being the head accountant, the CFO.
Surely it depends on the industry. I would imagine a HR expert is well placed to inch up the ranks to be CEO of a HR company, less so in an arms manufacturer though? That said once you’re operating at board level the skills are interchangeable between industry
 
Surely it depends on the industry. I would imagine a HR expert is well placed to inch up the ranks to be CEO of a HR company, less so in an arms manufacturer though? That said once you’re operating at board level the skills are interchangeable between industry
You'd be surprised, they get everywhere; along with those other freeloaders, Marketing.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
The public sector pay freeze announced this week will do wonders for retention. This type of 'public duty' is also unlikely to help.

If you're dishing out COVID vaccines I'd like to think that in the back of your mind there'd be a "thank **** I've got money coming in" whilst thinking this is turbo shit!
 

Bob65

War Hero
The public sector pay freeze announced this week will do wonders for retention. This type of 'public duty' is also unlikely to help.


Ask anyone in the private sector if they’d be happy with a pay freeze in a guaranteed job with a final salary pension.
 
Are they getting a massive pay rise?
We haven't been told we aren't, and as we've met (and exceeded) our financial targets for this year we'll be getting our bonuses too.

ETA: I work in the Defence Industry, which has been largely unaffected by Covid-19.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:
The public sector pay freeze announced this week will do wonders for retention. This type of 'public duty' is also unlikely to help.

Anyone thinking about leaving a stable, well paid job with the benefits available, like the armed forces, at this time is not thinking at all.

If I were still a tp oc, I'd be telling anyone coming in for a signing off interview that they need to go back and think again.
 

Bob65

War Hero
Surely it depends on the industry. I would imagine a HR expert is well placed to inch up the ranks to be CEO of a HR company, less so in an arms manufacturer though? That said once you’re operating at board level the skills are interchangeable between industry

It's important for any organisation to understand the business it's really in. Take Coca Cola as an example. You can be anywhere in the world and buy a Coke out of a fridge with the Coke logo on it. They happen to sell fizzy drinks, but their actual business is in branding and logistics. You could give those guys any product and they could shift it in the same way. Or you could say the same for Starbucks, they don't compete on making better coffee than their competition! Your HR company probably doesn't really do HR as such, it probably does operations and the COO will be the logical choice for CEO.

The Army doesn't really understand this about itself because it's a brave officer indeed who's the one to say "actually, we need the RLC much, much more than we need the Paras or the Guards"...
 
Thanks for sharing. What's your key thoughts on then and now - regarding army life - from what you've seen in more recent docs

I enjoyed my time in the army and only left because I got married. We always saw ourselves as being expected to do something every year. For example, in four and a half years in the battalion, I served three tours in NI and one UN tour.

That was as well as all the usual stuff involved with peacetime soldiering being based firstly in Germany as a part of BAOR and then back in the UK as an air portable (walk everywhere) battalion. Some of us even did a short stint in Guyana back in 75 training in the jungle while the rumours were circulating that the Venezuelans who have always claimed that roughly a third of Guyana should be part of their country were once again hinting that they wanted their part of the country back.

We were usually busy and what did make it enjoyable and sometimes bearable was the lack of bull crap that so many others put up with. It was seen as a sort of a pact if you like. We were expected as individuals especially when on operations to give it everything we had to give. Anything less wasn’t acceptable.

If you weren’t prepared to do that, then you could expect the hammer to come down very hard. That was the deal and to be honest, we liked it. Essentially we worked hard but we also played hard as well when we had the opportunities. Most soldiers aren’t saints and we definitely had an abundance of characters who were very much more akin to the devil but when it came to the job, there was no messing about.

I personally admire the soldiers of today, especially the infantry, and also those who have served over the years since I left the army near the end of the seventies. There has been an almost continuous series of conflicts over that period of time and the tempo has often been nightmarish and extremely dangerous and our soldiers have always done the job they signed up to do.

That’s often been done at a tragic price. Successive governments have ignored the plight of both still serving soldiers and veterans who have suffered immense problems because of their service but soldiers still willingly continue to go and do what they are ordered to do because they are like we were back in the day, committed to serving their country.

Living conditions in barracks seemed to have largely changed for the better. That’s just a sign of the times though and why not! The army is more publicly inclusive these days and that’s a welcome thing. We had a gay guy in our battalion back in the day and he was open about it. He was a regimental cook and everybody from the CO downwards took the view despite the fact that being gay in the army in those days was illegal, he might be gay but he was our gay guy and he was a green jacket. We looked after him and he was a valued member of the battalion. He could also cook a steak to perfection!

I’m not convinced about females now serving in infantry battalions. Many women have done admirable and extremely brave work on the frontlines of many conflicts and it’s right that they should be given those opportunities to serve if they are up for it. Soldiers will be soldiers though and in barracks life, relationships could be forged that would be inappropriate and even possibly dangerous when serving on a tour where the level of confrontation with an enemy was extremely active. I think there should be a divide to prevent that happening. The aim is to save lives!

So life in the army has moved on with the time and why not? The army from what I can see still does what it needs to do when it’s tasked to do it. That’s because those lads, and those lasses now, get off their backsides just like we used to and go and do their jobs.

Fair play to them and a well done from people like me and my mates who have served in the past and applaud them for what they do!
 
Living conditions in barracks seemed to have largely changed for the better. That’s just a sign of the times though and why not! The army is more publicly inclusive these days and that’s a welcome thing. We had a gay guy in our battalion back in the day and he was open about it. He was a regimental cook and everybody from the CO downwards took the view despite the fact that being gay in the army in those days was illegal that he might be gay but he was our gay guy and he was a green jacket. We looked after he and he was a valued member of the battalion.

Your CO and the rest of the battalion didnt have a problem with someone not adhering to military law as well as being a potential candidate for blackmail?
What a chipshop unit.
 
Your CO and the rest of the battalion didnt have a problem with someone not adhering to military law as well as being a potential candidate for blackmail?
What a chipshop unit.

By all means turn up at a reunion and tell them that. I guarantee when you leave the room, it won’t be on your feet.
 
By all means turn up at a reunion and tell them that. I guarantee when you leave the room, it won’t be on your feet.

Yeah Im sure a bunch of doddering old fuckwits who pay lip service to the QRs are really tough guys.

But thanks for confirming your unit was chip shop. They just decided to pick and choose what military laws should apply to them
 

Latest Threads

Top