Is the RBL aka Royal British Legion now simply a scam?

Was reading on a FB thread where some bloke posted about the RBL having 80 million quid of cash reserves, surely with that amount of dough sitting in the bank... almost seems like a scam but tarnishing the image of the poppy appeal will surely make brits like me furious but asking where does the money actually go is a fair question...

Now it may not be 80 million, but this article from 2019 would raise some eye brows

So... what is the reason for a charity to be so wealthy? Unless their overheads are so massive that manufacturing plastic poppies in China and paying volunteers is costing a chunk?

Most people on UC groups whinge about how veterans should be getting help more from the gov but erm... most people would think that... erm... what is the whole idea of a charity called the Royal British Legion for???
 
Interesting.

The case of Nestle vs. NatWest held that, in the absence of overriding considerations, Trustees should invest a fairly high proportion of the fund in equities.

I can't recall the suggested percentage - it might have been "a reasonable proportion" - one for @dingerr ?

 
RBL will not be alone in having large reserves. In the business they are in veterans charities have to survive, doing their job, during lean times as well as plush ones, and currently times are bleak.

Time to park your outrage bus (I hope you had a valid & signed ATUD).
 
Given they are currently spending somewhere in the region go 100 million a year on care and support for veterans, the sum held in reserve doesn't seem unreasnable


considering how its likely that the care and support needs of many young veterans of the last twenty years of warfare are almost certain to increase as they age, having something in reserve hardly seems like a bad idea
 

smallbore

Old-Salt
The details are at the charity commission web site ;

Since they spend £160 million each year ( £181 million in previous year) then 80 million is enough to keep going for 6 months.

It is normal for a charity to hold up to two years worth of expected future spending - so on this basis we would expect the RBL to hold £320 million. The latest annual report shows they have £350 million but some of that is in property and not immediately available.

You should also note that they are spending ( a little) more than they are earning.
 
RBL will not be alone in having large reserves. In the business they are in veterans charities have to survive, doing their job, during lean times as well as plush ones, and currently times are bleak.

Time to park your outrage bus (I hope you had a valid & signed ATUD).
Well, think I'll put that to the bandwagon jumper on social media, I don't frankly give a toss how fat a charity's pot is
 
Charities need to hold funds equalling X amount of spend for X amount of years as savings.

My MRT team is only a small charity (each Mountain/Search & Rescue team in England & Wales is a separate entity unlike the RNLI for example) yet we hold a couple of hundred thousand as a fixed cash base as part of our Constitution.

Last year was a low income period where that was useful, last Foot & Mouth outbreak was terrible too.

Maybe their constitution is similar.

Where it does get a bit sketchy is when they start mucking about with it - I remember Councils & Charities going bust when the Icelandic Banking thing happened because the 'Too Good To Be True' investment schemes were...
 
Am I alone in thinking that the current obsession with how much charities have in the bank or what their staff get paid is pernicious? You have to ask who benefits from pushing the (wholly unrealistic) idea that they should operate on a hand to mouth basis staffed only by volunteers.
 
Charities need to hold funds equalling X amount of spend for X amount of years as savings.

My MRT team is only a small charity (each Mountain/Search & Rescue team in England & Wales is a separate entity unlike the RNLI for example) yet we hold a couple of hundred thousand as a fixed cash base as part of our Constitution.

Last year was a low income period where that was useful, last Foot & Mouth outbreak was terrible too.

Maybe their constitution is similar.

Where it does get a bit sketchy is when they start mucking about with it - I remember Councils & Charities going bust when the Icelandic Banking thing happened because the 'Too Good To Be True' investment schemes were...
Informative thank you, can i ask how an MRT can earn income? Presumably from donations only.
 
Am I alone in thinking that the current obsession with how much charities have in the bank or what their staff get paid is pernicious? You have to ask who benefits from pushing the (wholly unrealistic) idea that they should operate on a hand to mouth basis staffed only by volunteers.
As mentioned in original post, it's basically skint veterans on UC and band wagon jumpers whom are whinging about the 20 quid a week covid payment being cut whom are making a ruckus in an attempt to vent frustrations, mainly labourites I expect
 
Am I alone in thinking that the current obsession with how much charities have in the bank or what their staff get paid is pernicious? You have to ask who benefits from pushing the (wholly unrealistic) idea that they should operate on a hand to mouth basis staffed only by volunteers.
It's when they start going outside of their obvious remit is when people get annoyed.

RNLI - people donate because they want to secure the waters around the UK and make sure those volunteering have the best possible kit to do that - not give swimming lessons to people in far flung countries (ironically, might save their lives when they get the dingy from Calais...)
 

ches

LE
I don't think this is rocket science. As other posters have said, there is a need for such reserves if not a lot more considering expenditure over the financial year. Couple that with a responsibility employees & associated costs as well as ongoing supplier debts/payments its not a large figure to have in reserve for size of organisation.
I find it strange that ppl get all outragey (civpop rather than our OP) about this sort of thing instead of doing a little simple research on basic economics fundamental requirement of running a huge charity with extensive financial commitments.
 
It's when they start going outside of their obvious remit is when people get annoyed.

RNLI - people donate because they want to secure the waters around the UK and make sure those volunteering have the best possible kit to do that - not give swimming lessons to people in far flung countries (ironically, might save their lives when they get the dingy from Calais...)
Their input into the World Drowning Project seems reasonable to me. I'll wager that only a small precentage of the non-swimmers they help are going to try and swim the channel. British charities doing stuff abroad that countries can't or just won't do used to be something we were proud of wasn't it?
 
Informative thank you, can i ask how an MRT can earn income? Presumably from donations only.
Direct donations
Bequeathed
Collection Buckets at Events
Collection Pots in shops and pubs etc... for loose change
Fundraising by individuals
Fundraising by the Team
Event Production by the Team
Companies will choose us as their 'Charity of the Year' and do stuff for us
Professional Services gifted - although we try and stay away from this, we have budget for equipment etc... to be purchased and maintained to the highest level.
Probably more that's off the top of my head.

Sadly, it's often the worst outcomes that produce the most income because we become very visible.

That said, rescuing one dog is worth ten humans when you post it up on Facebook.

Some donations come with specific parameters - rather than be put in the general pot, the patron would like it to go towards a certain bit of tech or equipment
 
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I don't think this is rocket science. As other posters have said, there is a need for such reserves if not a lot more considering expenditure over the financial year. Couple that with a responsibility employees & associated costs as well as ongoing supplier debts/payments its not a large figure to have in reserve for size of organisation.
I find it strange that ppl get all outragey (civpop rather than our OP) about this sort of thing instead of doing a little simple research on basic economics fundamental requirement of running a huge charity with extensive financial commitments.
I think the problem is that they do their 'research' via Google and it just reinforces their prejudices that charities are somehow equal to mega corporations because their bank balance has more zeros in it than theirs.
 
Their input into the World Drowning Project seems reasonable to me. I'll wager that only a small precentage of the non-swimmers they help are going to try and swim the channel. British charities doing stuff abroad that countries can't or just won't do used to be something we were proud of wasn't it?
That's not what I said - it's all about how things are perceived and why the CEO earning 6 figures might become an issue.

The last bit was a cheap joke.
 

Yokel

LE
This is the centenary of the Royal British Legion. I suspect that some of that cash reserve has come from interest paid on donations made decades ago - I imagine that they were some very large donations made in the early years.
 

philc

LE
It's when they start going outside of their obvious remit is when people get annoyed.

RNLI - people donate because they want to secure the waters around the UK and make sure those volunteering have the best possible kit to do that - not give swimming lessons to people in far flung countries (ironically, might save their lives when they get the dingy from Calais...)

This about the RNLI is a misconception, the RNLI are working with partners abroad at the behest of 1 donner who wanted to fund projects aboard, it is not funded by individual donations from the public.



Why are the RNLI funding burkinis?


The Panje Project teaches women swim survival skills in Zanzibar. The burkini, which is a full length swim suit is an innovative (and cheap) way of enabling girls in strict Muslim countries, to get into the water without compromising their cultural and religious beliefs. The RNLI have been involved in the Panje Project with the majority of the RNLI’s involvement funded by a donor who specifically wanted the money to go towards this project.
 
Direct donations
Bequeathed
Collection Buckets at Events
Collection Pots in shops and pubs etc... for loose change
Fundraising by individuals
Fundraising by the Team
Event Production by the Team
Companies will choose us as their 'Charity of the Year' and do stuff for us
Professional Services gifted - although we try and stay away from this, we have budget for equipment etc... to be purchased and maintained to the highest level.
Probably more that's off the top of my head.

Sadly, it's often the worst outcomes that produce the most income because we become very visible.

That said, rescuing one dog is worth ten humans when you post it up on Facebook.

Some donations come with specific parameters - rather than be put in the general pot, the patron would like it to go towards a certain bit of tech or equipment
The team I used to be on ran a big walking event each year. Three different routes, three distances, all marshalled by the team. That was our big earner each year, then topped up with all of the above.

I do remember that the Charity Commissioners keep a close eye on what money is being held or spent.
 
The team I used to be on ran a big walking event each year. Three different routes, three distances, all marshalled by the team. That was our big earner each year, then topped up with all of the above.

I do remember that the Charity Commissioners keep a close eye on what money is being held or spent.
Exactly - we do/did a couple of those each year. All gone out of the window now. Hopefully be back on in 2022.
 

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