Is the cost of living crisis real ?

Is the cost of living crisis real ?

  • Yes I`m suffering badly.

  • No, the useless fat messes need to get a grip and manage their finances and liflestyle.

  • The left are making out its far worse than it is .

  • I`m fine and couldn`t care less.

  • Its real, thousands are genuinely suffering.

  • It will get a lot worse and their will be genuine hardship.


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anglo

LE
I thought nuclear stations were 'throttled' rather than turned 'on and off' due to the nature of how they generate electricity?
There are exceptions to this rule, but they generally bring nuclear up to Nominal full load, and run it at that load, unless they have a fault, then it may be set to lower loads, but they don't turn nuclear up and down to balance the grid, a nuclear reactor must power up and down slowly, or they get all kinds of problems
Have a look here,



There is only around 6GW of nuclear power, so they try to run it all the time, as it's cheap and constant.
HTH
 

anglo

LE
"Topping" plants. Gas turbines (these days) only turned on for peaks.
There are 32 gas plants, gas plants are the backbone of the grid, there will be some of them running all the time,
their loading and the number of gas plants online will depend on the output of the wind turbines
As shown in the week's demand, screenshot

Screenshot 2022-05-22 at 15-28-22 G. B. National Grid status.png


There are currently 32 active gas fired combined cycle power plants operating in the United Kingdom, which have a total generating capacity of 28.0GW.
 
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There are 32 gas plants, gas plants are the backbone of the grid, there will be some of them running all the time,
their loading and the number of gas plants online will depend on the output of the wind turbines
As shown in the week's demand, screenshot

View attachment 664779

There are currently 32 active gas fired combined cycle power plants operating in the United Kingdom, which have a total generating capacity of 28.0GW.
No arguments with that.
 
I thought nuclear stations were 'throttled' rather than turned 'on and off' due to the nature of how they generate electricity?
I visited with people in France and they were showing me round the house the afternon we arrived. We were in the garage and there was click from the distribution board. They said it was the off peak coming on (at 1400 or so). Their off peak is in the afternoon rather than throttling back the nuclear stations.
 

anglo

LE
I visited with people in France and they were showing me round the house the afternon we arrived. We were in the garage and there was click from the distribution board. They said it was the off peak coming on (at 1400 or so). Their off peak is in the afternoon rather than throttling back the nuclear stations.
The French government have an 82% share in the electricity grid, but the grid is run by EDF,
it's the system we should have had, but our system was flogged off cheap.

EDF has raised its energy prices in France by just 4%, compared to the 54% increase consumers in UK have now been hit with.
From what I have read, the French pay around 15% less for their power
 
I think yes and no.

Yes, there are some issues, but we are being taken advantage of by price gouging.

For instance: oil is at $109 today, but it's down from $128 back in March. Have prices come down at the pumps?

Have they fcuk.

£1.83 per litre round my way and creeping up all the time.

I was paying £160 per month for gas and electric and I will soon be paying £280 per month in June and another increase in October. I am not in arrears or paying off a deficit. That's my monthly spend on a 3-bedroom, well-insulated semi.

....
If only it were so simple! The problem is when there are several levers being pulled at once and they then go on to affect something else it then becomes difficult to work out exactly what causes the shift that you finally observe.

Whilst the price of a barrel of oil has come down from the end of March, there was an increase in wages/pension costs for most retail employers from April so that gets built in to the price. The costs of delivering that fuel to the pumps from the refinery has gone up as fuel costs rose for the tanker too, so that price gets passed on.

Then the cost of pumping that fuel from the filling station tanks into your car and then heating and lighting the petrol station etc have shot up because electricity costs have rocketed and business is not protected by the cap that domestic consumers have, and an immediate price rise occurred which of course gets passed on.

I think you can see where this is going ...
 

TractorStats

Old-Salt
It's apparently still happening. However they may not get type approval until mid 2024.
To the best of my knowledge, the SMR does not exist at present even in prototype form. Trust me, the only thing that can be built quickly that provides continuous dispatchable generation is a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power station and those can be built and be operating in 3 years from a green field site and if you are in a hurry about 2 years on an existing redundant old power station site. I work with the electricity industry and tear my hair out at the state its in.
 

anglo

LE
To the best of my knowledge, the SMR does not exist at present even in prototype form. Trust me, the only thing that can be built quickly that provides continuous dispatchable generation is a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power station and those can be built and be operating in 3 years from a green field site and if you are in a hurry about 2 years on an existing redundant old power station site. I work with the electricity industry and tear my hair out at the state its in.
What do you think will happen if we have another winter like 1962/63 or god forbid 1946/7
 

TractorStats

Old-Salt
I thought nuclear stations were 'throttled' rather than turned 'on and off' due to the nature of how they generate electricity?

Which type of power stations lie dormant for periods? Genuinely curious.
The power stations with the lowest marginal costs of production run continuously which is nuclear and wind/solar when the wind is blowing and the sun is shining. The power stations that typically balance the supply and demand are the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) which do throttle their output and are what is called 'dispatchable' along with Drax that burns wood pellets. In the very short term term time horizon over minutes and a few hour the pump storage units also are used to balance the system. In winter a few old coal stations will be running intermittently when demand is high but essentially lay idle almost all year.
 
To the best of my knowledge, the SMR does not exist at present even in prototype form. Trust me, the only thing that can be built quickly that provides continuous dispatchable generation is a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power station and those can be built and be operating in 3 years from a green field site and if you are in a hurry about 2 years on an existing redundant old power station site. I work with the electricity industry and tear my hair out at the state its in.
Well they do have a lovely website to showcase the potential, and a recent press release. So talk the talk...

Rolls-Royce SMR has confirmed that it is targeting sites in North Wales for Small Modular Reactors.​

 

TractorStats

Old-Salt
What do you think will happen if we have another winter like 1962/63 or god forbid 1946/7
The problem will come in mid January when there is a massive weather system stuck over the UK for weeks on end. In those conditions we get cold still days when there is no wind and no sun and temperatures drop sharply. Electric demand usually peaks in these periods as well so its a perfect storm. If there is no wind or solar being generated the nuclear power stations and combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power stations will be on on full load and the interconnectors pulling power in from Europe at full capacity so the only reserve capacity we have left will be a few old coal stations. The problem is we have demolished almost all of them so bottom line is if we get a very very cold winter and a couple of nuclear or CCGT stations go down we really are stuffed.

There have been some close shaves over the years, one memorable one about 10 years ago the grid controllers were down to the last power station before 'Max Gen' which is an emergency condition when all power stations are called to run in excess of rateable capacity on a best efforts basis for as long as they can. This can only happen for a short time though before CCGT blades start melting and alternators start to overheat. To prevent damage the generating units would eventually start to trip automatically and a cascading blackout would occur over about 2 seconds. The UK has never suffered a total blackout. If that happened the whole grid would have to do what is called a Black Start and nobody is really sure how long that would take - perhaps 12 - 48 hours. They have done simulated exercises in perfect conditions but as military folk on here know - an exercise isn't the same as the real thing.
 
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anglo

LE
The problem will come in mid January when there is a massive weather system stuck over the UK for weeks on end. In those conditions we get cold still days when there is no wind and no sun and temperatures drop sharply. Electric demand usually peaks in these periods as well so its a perfect storm. If there is no wind or solar being generated the nuclear power stations and combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power stations will be on on full load and the interconnectors pulling power in from Europe at full capacity so the only reserve capacity we have left will be a few old coal stations. The problem is we have demolished almost all of them so bottom line is if we get a very very cold winter and a couple of nuclear or CCGT stations go down we really are stuffed.

There have been some close shaves over the years, one memorable one about 10 years ago the grid controllers were down to the last power station before 'Max Gen' which is an emergency condition when all power stations are called to run in excess of rateable capacity on a best efforts basis for as long as they can. This can only happen for a short time though before CCGT blades start melting and alternators start to overheat. To prevent damage the generating units would eventually start to trip automatically and a cascading blackout would occur over about 2 seconds. The UK has never suffered a total blackout. If that happened the whole grid would have to do what is called a Black Start and nobody is really sure how long that would take - perhaps 12 - 48 hours. They have done simulated exercises in perfect conditions but as military folk on here know - an exercise isn't the same as the real thing.
Excellent post, totally agree, Low wind conditions across the whole of the UK seem to be happening
more and more, there is a lot of talking the grid up, {IE smart grid} but if the truth is known, nobody
wants to spend the money, look at the fiasco with financing the new nuclear power plants.
Below, from 02/05/2022

Screenshot 2022-05-02 at 19-09-59 Asset map Asset map.png
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Looking at the poll answers and one of the questions says: "Let the slobs get a grip on their finances" or some such.

I have to agree that there is an element of that.

I happened to catch ten minutes of "Benefits Street" once and on there, was a "single" mother who was phoning her council/benefits helpline and she was raging at them for some reason and one of her lines went like: "My daughter is going to go hungry because of you."

On the face of it, you may think: "Oh poor woman, I hope the nasty benefits office sorts her out."

But you'd be wrong.

As she was talking on the phone, it was a late model iPhone. At the time of viewing, I was working three jobs and mine was many years older.

She had a Sky Q box, which at the time was a brand new system. On her kitchen sides, she had an impressive array of vodka, gins and whiskies. None of them were cheapo brands - all Gordon's, Glenfiddich and Smirnoff type labels.

She was also chain-smoking tailor-made cigarettes.

Another segment showed an older lady, who again, was preaching poverty as she smoked and when she opened the fridge door, it was full of posh dog food pouches and Strongbow cider.

There's a guy at work who's always moaning about being skint. I pointed out to him that he vapes like Thomas the Tank Engine and goes to the local garage every day to buy his lunch - A Ginsters pasty, (£2) couple of cans of Monster, (£3) grab bag of Monster Munch (£1), big bar of chocolate (£2), a Costa coffee and doughnuts for breakfast. for another £4.

His spend is at least £12-13 per day - sixty pounds a week, two hundred and forty pounds a month just on lunch.

This isn't poverty.

I've seen real poverty when I lived in Mexico, with kids picking mangos off trees and selling them at traffic lights to drivers. They live in tin shelters by the side of the road. I don't know where their parents are, or if they even have any.

They will have a stack of flattened cardboard boxes and work the car parks, using the boxes as shades for your car in return for a few pesos at a time.

These people know poverty, they do not know when they will next eat and every day is a hard scrabble just for enough to survive.

It certainly changed my perspective on what "poor" constitutes.
 
I think back to mid-pandemic when all the unemployed mouthbreathers were getting free money. Then they went spending their free money and suddenly the gun shops were stripped bare, car dealers took deposits and sold cars, motorcycle dealerships were emptied of everything.

Now I go to my local bike dealership and there is a steady trickle of one year to eighteen month old motorcycles starting to appear. Gun dealers are starting to display lightly used firearms, and car dealers are starting to get some used cars back in stock too.

Now is the time, if you have the cash, to be sitting, and waiting to pounce on that shiny thing you have always wanted.

Spot on. Used to be if you wanted almost new white goods, bikes, tellys, laptops and so on at a good price, just hit the mining towns in SA in January. The miners would get their Christmas bonuses and go utterly batpoo, buying the missus and kids all the newest shiny stuff and spending Christmas pissed and stuffed full of expensive grub.

Come January, the bills come in and the credit card is looking bloody grim, so all the shiny new kit is loaded up and pawned. Some real bargains to be had if you shop around.
 
Spot on. Used to be if you wanted almost new white goods, bikes, tellys, laptops and so on at a good price, just hit the mining towns in SA in January. The miners would get their Christmas bonuses and go utterly batpoo, buying the missus and kids all the newest shiny stuff and spending Christmas pissed and stuffed full of expensive grub.

Come January, the bills come in and the credit card is looking bloody grim, so all the shiny new kit is loaded up and pawned. Some real bargains to be had if you shop around.
An RAF guy that I worked with used to keep an ear to the ground for couples splitting up, then buy stuff cheap from them. He got some pretty good stuff for real bargain prices. Need a new bike? Speak to Tony.
 
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goes to the local garage every day to buy his lunch - A Ginsters pasty, (£2) couple of cans of Monster, (£3) grab bag of Monster Munch (£1), big bar of chocolate (£2), a Costa coffee and doughnuts for breakfast. for another £4.

His spend is at least £12-13 per day - sixty pounds a week, two hundred and forty pounds a month just on lunch.

This isn't poverty.

I've never understood this about my colleagues. I use a cool bag and make tuna pasta/ sandwiches for my work meals and bulk purchase multibuys for juice and junk food.

Saves me £50/ week not using near site shops for feeding when there isn't free catering on certain shifts.
 
I've never understood this about my colleagues. I use a cool bag and make tuna pasta/ sandwiches for my work meals and bulk purchase multibuys for juice and junk food.

Saves me £50/ week not using near site shops for feeding when there isn't free catering on certain shifts.
I remember explaining to a female colleague how her and her fiancé's twice daily Costa coffee habit was costing them almost £500 a month.
It took a pen, paper and calculator exercise for it to finally sink in.
 

Blogg

LE
I remember explaining to a female colleague how her and her fiancé's twice daily Costa coffee habit was costing them almost £500 a month.
It took a pen, paper and calculator exercise for it to finally sink in.

Had that discussion pre lockdown with our absolutely useless Departmental Admin. assistant who was always wailing she was skint.

Daily pattern:

Cafe Nero on way in for coffee and some pastry thing: £5 minimum

Lunch: always had coffee and something from Pret or another takeout: £7/8 ar least

Always another coffee in there somewhere, so blowing minimum £15 per day.

£300 per month.

Whilst working in a place which had four top end bean to cup machines per floor of the type used in hotels and restaurants available for use FoC and a highly subsidised eatery that turned out really good quality food 07.00- 16.00

Add in the fact that she and her coven used to go out for lunch/dinner at least once a week and there you go, blowing minimum £500 per month on wholly discretionary spend

Response? "Yeah but...."

(And yes, she was a bloater)
 

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