Is the cost of living crisis real ?

Is the cost of living crisis real ?

  • Yes I`m suffering badly.

  • No, the useless fat messes need to get a grip and manage their finances and liflestyle.

  • The left are making out its far worse than it is .

  • I`m fine and couldn`t care less.

  • Its real, thousands are genuinely suffering.

  • It will get a lot worse and their will be genuine hardship.


Results are only viewable after voting.
Dems, sounds like you have never been homeless, the one thing that homeless people see as all-important is their mobile. They don'ts spend their time on Tick Tock, it's essential to them for things such as knowing if things like a shelter are open are there any support services in the area or even just as a straight communication device, when you're homeless, normal rules don't apply, you don't pop home for a cuppa, you might be rough sleeping in a corner somewhere and in danger of being moved on by the police or just being beaten up by some pissed up ****** who thinks it's funny.

The internet is now on Maslow's hierarchy of needs for a reason.

View attachment 673408
But even if you're not homeless mobile phones are essential for almost everyone especially if you are working in many industry's that are zero hour contracts, which pay minimum wage, if you didn't have a mobile you don't work because you don't get the call.
This is not to say that some people don't take the piss, a small number do, I have some very distant family that haven't worked for 2 generations but still manage florida holidays somehow, but the fact they live on the Old Kent Road probably says it all. But it's important that people understand this is minority and is exactly what the daily mail, the sun express focus on.

SO let's not focus on the people that game the system, because they're a minority, let's think about how some people are in a serious position. On minimum wage, need to get to work can only drive, Petrol is up electricty has gone up, gas has gone up, food has gone up, some of these costs are more than double what they were.
A single Pepper in Lidll is 67p, I can hear you say grow your own, minimum wage earners don't have gardens greenhouses or even the time to look after peppers.

If you are on minimum wage or close to it, keeping up with bills is almost impossible.

A very good friend of mine walked the streets for 2 years moving from shelter to shelter, he didn't end up homeless because he's feckless, he ended up homless because he had a client that simply refused to pay a very large bill, By large I mean enough to buy a house. HIs business folded he lost everything, after 2 years he now has a job as an NHS carer, he lives in temporay accomadation he's incredibly frugal and at the end of the month he has £20 or £30 left and that is only because on top of his job as a carer he does gardening jobs on his days off, so he very literally works 7 days a week. The only good meal he gets is from the old couples who he does the gardening for.

Thi is quite typical of people on under £18,000 a year. Rent often takes 1/2 of your available income then add food travel council tax TAX! and the many other things it all adds up to a very miserable existence for many.

I find it much better when I see a report on the news, to remember that the news article will be very specific about who they show because they want to push a certain message and rarely if ever is that person an example of what is really happening.

I've seen reports of people who are supposed to be using food banks, The guy in it had a fashion ski jacket on, a nice shiny new kitchen, clearly not the norm, most likly to be a fried of the reporter.
I'll end with being on the breadline is complex and has serious consequences, it's in part as a result the wage squeeze and the lack of cheap affordable housing and the fact manufacturing and other big employment jobs have ceased to exist.

Just my two pennies
Excellent post.You can also use your phone to make money: youtube channels, running facebook pages, writing (Jack Monroe wrote The Bootstrap Cook on her phone, I think)
 
Thanks for that.
BTW, I do have some experience of the benefits system and its intricacies and fully understand what being sanctioned involves.
I also have an idea how difficult it is for some people.
Shame there isn't a facility within the Job Centres to assist people in looking for and applying for work.
Perhaps consideration could be given to computer access in public libraries(?)

As I said before, IMHO mobiles are only "essential" because we have made them so.
Instead of a convenient tool, which they should be, they have become managers of our lives.
Not mine and not for most people I know, even those in their late 20's.
 
Topped up with diesel today. Bit disconcerting watching the price go round twice as fast as the amount of litres going in.

€45 worth (got €4.50 government reduction) and now my little forecast on distance remaining gone up by 270 km.
 
Not mine and not for most people I know, even those in their late 20's.

I only use mine as a phone, rarely check messages, hate and generally ignore people if they have the audacity to presume to text me without being invited, don't give people, let alone random businesses my phone number unless I actually know them and NEED them to contact me.

In the USA every business you have some financial interaction with expects to be given your social security number...........so that:

a. They inevitably get hacked and all your personal details end up on the dark web and Gupta in Mumbai clones your ID, or
b. A member of their staff nicks the data, sells it to someone down the pub, it inevitably ends up on the dark web and Gupta in Mumbai clones your ID.

Nowadays, those organisations who cannot come up with an excuse to ask you for your social security number, ask you for your phone number. They then subscribe to Experian where someone else has already provided your phone number linked to your social security number. So they get all your information through the backdoor means of a phone number as a unique identifier.

Experian: My Mrs contracted with them for a year, I used their products for a few years and was politely told that when I finished my PhD the door was open to a job with them. They have better, more comprehensive, records on you than those security service chaps do.
 
Last edited:
Dems, sounds like you have never been homeless, the one thing that homeless people see as all-important is their mobile. They don'ts spend their time on Tick Tock, it's essential to them for things such as knowing if things like a shelter are open are there any support services in the area or even just as a straight communication device, when you're homeless, normal rules don't apply, you don't pop home for a cuppa, you might be rough sleeping in a corner somewhere and in danger of being moved on by the police or just being beaten up by some pissed up ****** who thinks it's funny.

The internet is now on Maslow's hierarchy of needs for a reason.

View attachment 673408
But even if you're not homeless mobile phones are essential for almost everyone especially if you are working in many industry's that are zero hour contracts, which pay minimum wage, if you didn't have a mobile you don't work because you don't get the call.
This is not to say that some people don't take the piss, a small number do, I have some very distant family that haven't worked for 2 generations but still manage florida holidays somehow, but the fact they live on the Old Kent Road probably says it all. But it's important that people understand this is minority and is exactly what the daily mail, the sun express focus on.

SO let's not focus on the people that game the system, because they're a minority, let's think about how some people are in a serious position. On minimum wage, need to get to work can only drive, Petrol is up electricty has gone up, gas has gone up, food has gone up, some of these costs are more than double what they were.
A single Pepper in Lidll is 67p, I can hear you say grow your own, minimum wage earners don't have gardens greenhouses or even the time to look after peppers.

If you are on minimum wage or close to it, keeping up with bills is almost impossible.

A very good friend of mine walked the streets for 2 years moving from shelter to shelter, he didn't end up homeless because he's feckless, he ended up homless because he had a client that simply refused to pay a very large bill, By large I mean enough to buy a house. HIs business folded he lost everything, after 2 years he now has a job as an NHS carer, he lives in temporay accomadation he's incredibly frugal and at the end of the month he has £20 or £30 left and that is only because on top of his job as a carer he does gardening jobs on his days off, so he very literally works 7 days a week. The only good meal he gets is from the old couples who he does the gardening for.

Thi is quite typical of people on under £18,000 a year. Rent often takes 1/2 of your available income then add food travel council tax TAX! and the many other things it all adds up to a very miserable existence for many.

I find it much better when I see a report on the news, to remember that the news article will be very specific about who they show because they want to push a certain message and rarely if ever is that person an example of what is really happening.

I've seen reports of people who are supposed to be using food banks, The guy in it had a fashion ski jacket on, a nice shiny new kitchen, clearly not the norm, most likly to be a fried of the reporter.
I'll end with being on the breadline is complex and has serious consequences, it's in part as a result the wage squeeze and the lack of cheap affordable housing and the fact manufacturing and other big employment jobs have ceased to exist.

Just my two pennies

Good one.
 

Brooker

Old-Salt
I only use mine as a phone, rarely check messages, hate and generally ignore people if they have the audacity to presume to text me without being invited, don't give people, let alone random businesses my phone number unless I actually know them and NEED them to contact me.

In the USA every business you have some financial interaction with expects to be given your social security number...........so that:

a. They inevitably get hacked and all your personal details end up on the dark web and Gupta in Mumbai clones your ID, or
b. A member of their staff nicks the data, sells it to someone down the pub, it inevitably ends up on the dark web and Gupta in Mumbai clones your ID.

Nowadays, those organisations who cannot come up with an excuse to ask you for your social security number, ask you for your phone number. They then subscribe to Experian where someone else has already provided your phone number linked to your social security number. So they get all your information through the backdoor means of a phone number as a unique identifier.

Experian: My Mrs contracted with them for a year, I used their products for a few years and was politely told that when I finished my PhD the door was open to a job with them. They have better, more comprehensive, records on you than those security service chaps do.
Yeah frightening, and now to make it even worse imagine if your gov has given NHS medical records to Amazon
Raab said but it's ok we anonymised it, but as you know with extreme;y large datasets meeting other extreme;y large datasets then there is no such thing
 
Yeah frightening, and now to make it even worse imagine if your gov has given NHS medical records to Amazon
Raab said but it's ok we anonymised it, but as you know with extreme;y large datasets meeting other extreme;y large datasets then there is no such thing

I was at it 25 years ago. Cumulatively for various research projects or my research I had access to lots, and lots, of personal data: The raw census data, as much post code data as I wanted, customer data from various motor manufacturers, one of the HUGE Uk DIY chains, a couple of banks and bibs and bobs from other sources.

I, and three other research students, were using population data to build AI driven gravity models to predict customer spending habits. We were right to within 7%, that is we could predict spending at main dealer motor dealerships to types and models purchased, and monies spent, to within 7%. Which, when predicting human behaviour from data collected is pretty impressive.

To be able to perform my particular magic I had to not only learn about AI, and huge datasets, I also had to learn about data mining and data warehouses. 25 years ago data mining and data warehouses were in their infancy - I actually attended the first data mining conference. Nowadays data warehouses are huge, when I was at it just Sainsburys was collecting in excess of a terabyte of customer data a day, a day.

Then you get to companies like EDS who were owned by an American, Ross Perot, it was actually said that he had more information available to him than the CIA did. Hardly surprising really, he had contracts with many public and private organisations to store and manage their data in his processing centres. EDS even stored and managed lots of the data held on the popuation of the UK for and behalf of various government agencies.
 

Brooker

Old-Salt
I was at it 25 years ago. Cumulatively for various research projects or my research I had access to lots, and lots, of personal data: The raw census data, as much post code data as I wanted, customer data from various motor manufacturers, one of the HUGE Uk DIY chains, a couple of banks and bibs and bobs from other sources.

I, and three other research students, were using population data to build AI driven gravity models to predict customer spending habits. We were right to within 7%, that is we could predict spending at main dealer motor dealerships to types and models purchased, and monies spent, to within 7%. Which, when predicting human behaviour from data collected is pretty impressive.

To be able to perform my particular magic I had to not only learn about AI, and huge datasets, I also had to learn about data mining and data warehouses. 25 years ago data mining and data warehouses were in their infancy - I actually attended the first data mining conference. Nowadays data warehouses are huge, when I was at it just Sainsburys was collecting in excess of a terabyte of customer data a day, a day.

Then you get to companies like EDS who were owned by an American, Ross Perot, it was actually said that he had more information available to him than the CIA did. Hardly surprising really, he had contracts with many public and private organisations to store and manage their data in his processing centres. EDS even stored and managed lots of the data held on the popuation of the UK for and behalf of various government agencies.
Yeah our info is well and truly out there..
Lucky I have put on so much weight they won't recognise me in a picture ;)
 

GDog

War Hero
I was at it 25 years ago. Cumulatively for various research projects or my research I had access to lots, and lots, of personal data: The raw census data, as much post code data as I wanted, customer data from various motor manufacturers, one of the HUGE Uk DIY chains, a couple of banks and bibs and bobs from other sources.

I, and three other research students, were using population data to build AI driven gravity models to predict customer spending habits. We were right to within 7%, that is we could predict spending at main dealer motor dealerships to types and models purchased, and monies spent, to within 7%. Which, when predicting human behaviour from data collected is pretty impressive.

To be able to perform my particular magic I had to not only learn about AI, and huge datasets, I also had to learn about data mining and data warehouses. 25 years ago data mining and data warehouses were in their infancy - I actually attended the first data mining conference. Nowadays data warehouses are huge, when I was at it just Sainsburys was collecting in excess of a terabyte of customer data a day, a day.

Then you get to companies like EDS who were owned by an American, Ross Perot, it was actually said that he had more information available to him than the CIA did. Hardly surprising really, he had contracts with many public and private organisations to store and manage their data in his processing centres. EDS even stored and managed lots of the data held on the popuation of the UK for and behalf of various government agencies.
I've had to deal with legacy EDS Government systems and whilst I never want to do it again God help the suckers that will one day have to look after Crapita's shite
 
I've had to deal with legacy EDS Government systems and whilst I never want to do it again God help the suckers that will one day have to look after Crapita's shite

Never had the pleasure of them. I had EDS interview me after I had done a side project on my PhD for a bank that they were doing expensive consultancy and project work for. They had bumped into me whilst I was gathering information on the data holdings and had chatted with me about what I was doing. Ten of them around a conference table interviewing me, even without pinging the two of them who were making copious notes it was evident they were trying to pick my noggin to see if there was anything they could sell in to the bank. They did not know I had already built a working system for the marketing team, they were about as sincere as a bunch of secondhand car salesmen.
 

Simmerit

War Hero
Scarey thought. If so, GE in the new year?

The NHS is buying something called the Federated Data Platform and they are awarding the contract at the end of the year. It’s hugely sensitive because of the political fall out given it’s the run up to the GE.

So yes. Quite possibly a GE next year given that feedback
 
A big jump in Spanish Inflation

Spanish 12-month inflation rose to 10.2% in June, the first time it has surpassed 10% since April 1985.

That’s up from 8.7% in the previous month, preliminary data from the National Statistics Institute (INE) showed, and rather higher than the 9% forecast.
 
The NHS is buying something called the Federated Data Platform and they are awarding the contract at the end of the year. It’s hugely sensitive because of the political fall out given it’s the run up to the GE.

So yes. Quite possibly a GE next year given that feedback

Umm was at the posh office end of the docks the other week. Walking behind two suited and booted non-Scouse; one was practising his pitch to t'other, waffling on in technic bollox jargon, as they do. Switched off until I heard his concluding pitch point about their NHS app returning two-and-half pounds for every NHS pound in. For some reason it squirreled itself in my mind. Today I saw this:


Added to your post:
More unpleasant times ahead for NHS users: App says, no;
and
BTW your health records are now available to insurance, pensions, banks, other financial cnuts (and foreign govts) through sales or the multiple backdoor we installed that we can covertly sell off.
 
Place your bets.

My money is on £3 quid a litre by Christmas and a 30% increase in food prices by Crimbo too
Indeed.
Then dial in panic potential buying, but this time stores will deal with it better.
SWMBO and I are already dribbling in " back up stocks" of basics to arrange in our loft where 2 years back I built up 2 x 5 shelf industrial units. Just basics in jars & tins. Spices, basmatis, pastas, toiletries etc.
It all worked for us through Cov-Id but we are not doing it quite to the level now.
TBH, mixing it with Joe Public is something to be body swerved if possible.
1 in 30 Scots infections says so.
 

Latest Threads

Top