Is the Civil Service that bad?

Perhaps you should read some of the work by the Government Economic Service on improving public sector productivity before resorting to made up ad hominem comments. Have you read the Efficiency Toolkit?
I wasn't talking to you.
I haven't read it, summarise it for me please.
More efficient that reading it myself, you see.
 
I fully get the desire to work for the public good, particularly those who enter vocations like nurses, the police and border roles. But the vast majority of public servants don’t work for the public good; they do overhead administrative jobs and do so with poor productivity.

There’s almost nothing that is done at DVLA that can’t be automated today. Banks automate far more complex tasks. Other countries have automated driver and vehicle licensing. Do tell me pray, what public service does DVLA provide.
keeping wales part of the union at a guess
 
Its the pension trap that is keeping a lot of CS from walking way, i will admit that if you can get the years in even the year one is better than private sector, however it is only a matter of time before the state pension is means tested, and those that have worked all there lives get treated as shite to keep the welfare state going
Fortunately I stayed on the classic. Brown’s attempt was a ripoff.
 
Perhaps you should read some of the work by the Government Economic Service on improving public sector productivity before resorting to made up ad hominem comments. Have you read the Efficiency Toolkit?
Would that Government Economic Service be the collective of a Civil Service profession of economists throughout government departments?

Those useless Civil Servants who have no idea what they are doing whilst sat at home twiddling their thumbs ?
 
Would that Government Economic Service be the collective of a Civil Service profession of economists throughout government departments?

Those useless Civil Servants who have no idea what they are doing whilst sat at home twiddling their thumbs ?
It'd better not be the same, or Bugsy The Builder is gonna look a right rollicking raw prawn ;)
 
It was a live feed so no linky to the builder. I understand what you are saying however, it still does not alter the fact that thousands of civil service are working from home hence passport- computer says no. Driving license - computer says no. Both my wife and I work in the private sector and the majority are back at their desks.
London weighting! If your not in the office you don't get in end of

Official laptops left out. You would hope there would be a group policy to lock after 5 minutes of not being used.

This pandemic has proved 3 things

1 The CS are a law unto themselves

2. They are doing everything possible to get the elected government ousted.

3. They really are crap at organising evacuations
What a load of pish
 
But the vast majority of public servants don’t work for the public good; they do overhead administrative jobs and do so with poor productivity.
There is a point at which I agree, Blair got rid of those who did put into the Public Purse, unfortunately the squalid little deals he did for the PFI initiatives lined the pockets of the executives and they kept conditions squalid. Rank little socialist pretending to be a tory.
 
Thanks for the witty retort made my day whilst dropping the kids off
I was more polite than your diatribe warranted. I've never been a CS BTW.
 
I wasn't talking to you.
I haven't read it, summarise it for me please.
More efficient that reading it myself, you see.
I haven’t read the two page document on improving public service efficiency that is supposedly available to all civil servants, which is why I asked. It’s not in the public domain.

However here’s a post that describes how public sector productivity is measured and refers to the two page guidance:


To my eye, it’s a fudge because it doesn’t actually calculate productivity. It uses a complex and highly questionable method to estimate the “value” added by public sector activity.

Likewise, if you delve into the annual ONS reports on productivity, you find claims of % improvements that aren’t substantiated by actual £s. They’re estimates based on some complex formula to guesstimate the value generated from the money input into a department.

What’s my point? No-one really knows if civil servants are delivering value. Those in the system will always think they are working hard and delivering because that’s pretty much all they know. Their “customers” will always think otherwise.
 
D

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Guest
This man wants Civil Servants who are WFH
1653509695815.png


To return to the office so he can sack them!
 
What’s my point? No-one really knows if civil servants are delivering value. Those in the system will always think they are working hard and delivering because that’s pretty much all they know. Their “customers” will always think otherwise.
A fairly telling statement. The point about CS is it’s a service delivering different services for different departments. They don’t all do the same thing. They also cost, but it’s an unavoidable cost. It cannot therefore, be assessed on VFM in the same way as a company, which has it’s own policies. We have 1.5 million working in the NHS , that’s the biggest employer, so the value is determined how? Against a series of ad hoc values that in themselves have none. Sunak want’s to get rid of 90 k CS which is down to the finalisation of Brexit amongst others, so there will be a recruitment freeze. Brown did the same thing in 2008, reminding all and sundry that Britain could not afford to pay them.
The people Who screamed loudest were those who wanted no interference from CS departments and yet when this country can’t respond at the drop of a hat, they say we should be prepared. How exactly is that to be done. You’ve seen the mess that people got into with Customs issues, yet there were few left with the experience in what is a relatively simple matter.
 
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I haven’t read the two page document on improving public service efficiency that is supposedly available to all civil servants, which is why I asked. It’s not in the public domain.

However here’s a post that describes how public sector productivity is measured and refers to the two page guidance:


To my eye, it’s a fudge because it doesn’t actually calculate productivity. It uses a complex and highly questionable method to estimate the “value” added by public sector activity.

Likewise, if you delve into the annual ONS reports on productivity, you find claims of % improvements that aren’t substantiated by actual £s. They’re estimates based on some complex formula to guesstimate the value generated from the money input into a department.

What’s my point? No-one really knows if civil servants are delivering value. Those in the system will always think they are working hard and delivering because that’s pretty much all they know. Their “customers” will always think otherwise.
Hyperbolics again.
Please sweep up after you. Or deploy an air freshener.
 
Would that Government Economic Service be the collective of a Civil Service profession of economists throughout government departments?

Those useless Civil Servants who have no idea what they are doing whilst sat at home twiddling their thumbs ?
At what point have I suggested that civil servants are useless?

Parkinson’s Law and the Pursuit of Progress is as relevant today as it was when first written in 1958. Productivity and public service are essentially oxymorons.

It’s interesting to note that the Government Economic Service identifies that using markets and competition is a key driver of efficiency. Yet most civil servants fear it.
 
At what point have I suggested that civil servants are useless?
In the last sentence of your next paragraph
Parkinson’s Law and the Pursuit of Progress is as relevant today as it was when first written in 1958. Productivity and public service are essentially oxymorons.

It’s interesting to note that the Government Economic Service identifies that using markets and competition is a key driver of efficiency. Yet most civil servants fear it.
Do they ? Elaborate
 
At what point have I suggested that civil servants are useless?

Parkinson’s Law and the Pursuit of Progress is as relevant today as it was when first written in 1958. Productivity and public service are essentially oxymorons.

It’s interesting to note that the Government Economic Service identifies that using markets and competition is a key driver of efficiency. Yet most civil servants fear it.
Your "Their “customers” will always think otherwise."
I only had to scroll up about 4 inches. And that's just the latest one *today*.
So the answer to your rhetorical-I-hope-no-one-notices question is "Just about every guffing post".
 

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