Is the Army the answer?

Do it. Get off your hole, get your phys sorted to a decent standard. When you’re in the depot and further training, work hard, get on with it while trying to keep in mind why you’ve put yourself there and what the alternative is if you jack it. Do it now or you’ll be a forty or fifty something soon enough always wondering, “what if”. You know it. Good luck
At that age he'll be one of those "I nearly joined the Army" types.
 

Arkanstigger

War Hero
Well, stop procrastinating and unintentionally building mental delay barriers - do it now!
Agree 100%.

OP: You won't turn up at the careers office on Monday and be in training on Tuesday. You'll have plenty of time to work on fitness.

"I'll do this when I get fitter"
"I'll start that diet next month"
"I'll look for a better job once xmas/new year/my holiday 3 months away is finished"

You can waste your life procrastinating and waiting for some perfect point in the future before actually doing anything.

You need to be working on your head as much as your body. Looking at your last post:

"Whether I get in, or whether it's a case of "nearly" because of failure or I get med discharged or whatever, I'm still going to try. If I don't at least give it a crack I'll regret it."

You're already thinking of failure and how you'll justify it.

That might sound harsh, but I've spent years fighting thoughts like that, and still do to this day. Edited to add: Dealing with negative thoughts and excuses is a lot harder than the physical side, mental toughness shouldn' t be underestimated.

Don't half heartedly "at least give it a go", do it and do it now.
 
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ugly

LE
Moderator
I see the army as a new career in which I can improve myself as a person and also build a more financially secure future for myself and my kids. Question is; would it all be worth the sacrafices? I just do not know.
If the question is can you take the good times and use them to block out the bad ones then consider this, risking everything for your mates who you hope (really know) will do the same for you and having been in such a family then there is no way to say no!
However happiness can decrease as well as increase depending on the situation and how you handle it, after all it’s what you make of it!
 

Club Swinger

War Hero
I got a glimpse of that post and although it was removed I'd still like to pass comment...

I accept any constructive criticism, however, deciding to stay home to help raise my kids and watch them grow up has never been an excuse not to join, it was my decision to put their needs before my own. Now they are at a point where I feel they would be able to understand and rationalise my decision to pursue an army career. I don't think it's ever too late and I'm still within the upper age limit, so why not try. It's entirely possible I could completely flunk basic, but at least I'd have no regrets in trying.
I was the second man on the balcony at the Iranian Embassy siege during Op Nimrod in May 1980.

I was the first person to get my boots wet in South Georgia in June 1982.

I was the first man through the door of the compound in Pakistan in May 2011 as part of Operation Neptune Spear.

I am the 'simpleton' who posted the post that was deleted. I foolishly thought that you may be so incensed by my post that you would have done what I would have done in your situation. That is wrapped up warm, grabbed some blankets or a sleeping bag, a bag of scoff and a flask of soup, and camped out on the doorstep of the Army Recruitment Office overnight to be first through the door ready to sign on.

You say you made the decision to stay at home to watch your kids growing up and help raise them. Both my sons were born while I was in the Army and they came with me and her indoors, we travelled the world together, and all of us would do it all again in a heartbeat. Yes there were times apart from each other, but that made the times together more precious and even better.

Every post you have made in this thread is littered with signs of good intentions, which unfortunately are heavily countered with 'get out of jail cards' with all kinds of reasons why you might not make it, so setting yourself up for failure.

So all piss taking apart, stop with the negative vibes, do what everyone is urging and willing you to do, get your arse down to the recruitment office and sign up to a new and secure future.
a-round-tuit.jpg

Take this with you. And FFS dont mention anything to do with depression.
 

JayDog

Swinger
I foolishly thought that you may be so incensed by my post that you would have done what I would have done in your situation. That is wrapped up warm, grabbed some blankets or a sleeping bag, a bag of scoff and a flask of soup, and camped out on the doorstep of the Army Recruitment Office overnight to be first through the door ready to sign on.
If your aim was to actually piss me off to the point of me leaving my chair at that moment and head to the careers office thinking "I'll show that guy", you failed. If that's what you would have done, I'd say don't be pressured into anything. I appreciate all the support I've had here and it does spur me on and motivate me.
You say you made the decision to stay at home to watch your kids growing up and help raise them. Both my sons were born while I was in the Army and they came with me and her indoors, we travelled the world together, and all of us would do it all again in a heartbeat. Yes there were times apart from each other, but that made the times together more precious and even better.
You're a lucky man to have been able to have them with you as you travelled. No doubt that would make things easier but I don't have that option as their mother and I are no longer together. My boys would stay at home.
Every post you have made in this thread is littered with signs of good intentions, which unfortunately are heavily countered with 'get out of jail cards' with all kinds of reasons why you might not make it, so setting yourself up for failure.
I'm acknowledging the fact that yes, I could fail, yes this could be too hard, yes I could get injured, I'm a realist, but that's not to say I'm not going to give it everything. It's not as though I'm 16 and I can try multiple times, this is likely my one and only crack at it which makes me want to take it very seriously. Trust me, I will visit recruitment and I will sign up.
 
If your aim was to actually piss me off to the point of me leaving my chair at that moment and head to the careers office thinking "I'll show that guy", you failed. If that's what you would have done, I'd say don't be pressured into anything. I appreciate all the support I've had here and it does spur me on and motivate me.

You're a lucky man to have been able to have them with you as you travelled. No doubt that would make things easier but I don't have that option as their mother and I are no longer together. My boys would stay at home.

I'm acknowledging the fact that yes, I could fail, yes this could be too hard, yes I could get injured, I'm a realist, but that's not to say I'm not going to give it everything. It's not as though I'm 16 and I can try multiple times, this is likely my one and only crack at it which makes me want to take it very seriously. Trust me, I will visit recruitment and I will sign up.
Let us know on Monday how you got on at the AFCO.
 
Why is that? Not exactly expecting it to be a walk in the park so fully prepared to get my ass kicked. Well aware that it’s early mornings and late night I will probably struggle with, but it’s all about adapting to a new way of life which is what I want to do.
I'm sure if you're considering this COA you have, or expect to have, the physical resilience, but do you have the mental resilience to be treated like a 12 yo as you go through basic? You will be expected to be responsible, but have no responsibility over what happens to you. It's a tough gig, and the more adult you are, the further out of your comfort zone it will be mentally, even without the additional physical challenges and the doubtless mantle of peer responsibiity of being the senior in your intake.
 
Whether I get in, or whether it's a case of "nearly" because of failure or I get med discharged or whatever, I'm still going to try. If I don't at least give it a crack I'll regret it.

Your biggest obstacle may be the atrocious recruiting process.

I understand it's improved hugely in the last year or so, which means it's utterly shite.
 

Ozzy00

Crow
Good luck mate! I Hope you smash it. Just a couple of words of advise (Feel free to ignore as im not in yet) but I saw you expressed worry about your previous medical history if you get denied/deferred Appeal it and get as much medical proof that your ok and good to go and will do everything you can to make the army your future. I Got P8ed which means permanently unfit for service but after appealing it and waiting out a deferral I have now got my start date.
If you want some help going through the application process feel free to PM me and ill be more than happy to help you get through it.
And just so you know as others have said it will be a few months before you get to Selection and if by that time you feel your not ready then ask for a Mock Selection which is a one day event at a nearby base which goes though what the fitness requirements are and tests you on them and if you dont meet the requirements they hopefully will tell you where to work on and you can move back your Selection until your ready!

Throughout your application try and put 110% into getting everything they asked you to do and it might possibly be noticed that you really really want to be in.

Anyways good luck and I wish you the best!
Ozzy
 

The_Poltroon

Clanker
If I had my time again (or I was thinking of enlisting today) I'd choose the RAF over the Army anytime.

They treat you better, the accommodation is generally better and it appears to be a much better all round experience.
 
If I had my time again (or I was thinking of enlisting today) I'd choose the RAF over the Army anytime.

They treat you better, the accommodation is generally better and it appears to be a much better all round experience.
RAF women are, on average, hotter and more likely to wear stockings than their fat, snaggletoothed Army sisters.
 

Club Swinger

War Hero
If I had my time again (or I was thinking of enlisting today) I'd choose the RAF over the Army anytime.

They treat you better, the accommodation is generally better and it appears to be a much better all round experience.
Plus they don't kick you out at 40 years of age if you haven't become LE.
 
“Is army the answer?”

Mmm. Depends what the question is. I suspect most of us on here (who actually served) never needed to put our decision to the vote: it was something we’d wanted to do for ages and we just went and did it. I suppose we might’ve run it past our parents / guardians but more as a fait accompli than something up for debate.
You either want to be a soldier or you don’t, you need to be honest with yourself. A lot of people reach for the army as the archetypal example of having “done something with their lives” but their lack of real commitment will soon out- and add another perceived failure to their pile of baggage.
Saying that, it seems that your real interest is in healthcare so either bite the bullet, get down to your careers office and get your application going. Forget infantry, go for RAMC where you might hopefully build on your previous experience and get some quals which will put in place the foundation of a career in civvy street a few years down the line.
The other option is to forget the army and go back to the NHS as a health care assistant and try and build your nursing career from there.

Whatever you do- having gone from prospective nurse / radiographer to gym cleaner- you know you’re not fulfilling your potential at the moment.
 
Choices: Medic, you have obviously thought about wanting to do something medicky previously with nursing and radiography, go be a medic. You could even lob in for being attached to the para's, or even THEM blokes who we never mention...........that would be a tale for your boy's.

Fitness: Get out and get running, lot's of info on here on how to approach that. Also take up walking a few miles with a 10lb or 15lb rucksack on your back.

Motivation: Thats down to you boss. Either you want to do something with your life, or you don't and when you are 40, 50, 60 and 70 you can either look back and think, "I did fcuk all", or "fcuk me what a life I enjoyed the ride".

There are lots of us on here who think it was probably the best and worst job of our lives, but we did it, we have memories, and many of us would go back tomorrow for free if the offer was made.

..................still here?

PS If you are going to join you best get used to the idea of not being able to live at home with mum doing your washing and ironing and having your lads over for tea twice a week for a while. Harsh, but it needs to be said.

Digitum Extractum.
This. It's not about pressure, it's about motivation. In particular, self-motivation. I was all set up to become an officer. Had a place a Sandhurst and fcuked it up through being young and stupid. Couple years later I found the motivation to join as a soldier, and thank God I did. As @Effendi says, you can either look back and think, "I did fcuk all", or "fcuk me what a life I enjoyed the ride".

In my case, at 22/23 years of age, I was taking helicopters to work. Me, a lance jack, and a Puma would come and get me, and me alone. The Army gave me the world, and I grasped it with both hands. My Army career put me on the front page of every newspaper in the world (closest I ever came to fame :) ). It set me up for a civvy career that has been wonderful. I've been to 60-odd countries, every continent except Asia, flown 1.8M miles, done some pretty cool shit with three-letter agencies, and drank more beer than I care to even begin to calculate. I would do it all again in a heartbeat.

But it all began with opening the door of the AFCO (ACIO as it was back then). It's up to you what you do with your life, but the Army is not going to come and find you, you have to start the path. And don't stop, keep on motoring. Something lit a fire under my arse at 18, and at 51, I'm still not done yet. If you go into the AFCO on Monday, and ask the recruiting Sgt for advice, what have you lost? Fcuk all. What do you stand to gain? Everything. I'm not going to tell you what to do, you need to figure it out yourself. You either know what to do, or you don't. There's no middle ground. Every day you put it off, you're just a day older, and will have one day less as a soldier. I've been out longer than I was in now, but I still polish my shoes, stand up straight and can't abide laziness. You can't buy that anywhere else. Oh, and join R SIGNALS :)
 
The army is not the answer.

As we all know, ‘42’ is the answer.

But as for yourself:

Good luck if you go for it.







For me it was bloody hard at 19.
 
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