Is it possible to be Dishonorably discharged from the army over protein?

I am a regular solider serving in an infantry battalion. I have been in over 2 years now and was faced with my first CDT in battalion on Monday. I am very paranoid about the result after comments made during the test from the ranking supervisors within the test site. I told them I am on dietary supplements I.e protein and creatine but when I mentioned the supplements I was using it raised eyebrows. I am on Serious Mass, a mass gainer retailed by Holland and Barretts however it is not provided on the list of products on informed sports. I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of or knows of an individual being kicked out over use of a product that isn't listed on informed sports?
 
I am a regular solider serving in an infantry battalion. I have been in over 2 years now and was faced with my first CDT in battalion on Monday. I am very paranoid about the result after comments made during the test from the ranking supervisors within the test site. I told them I am on dietary supplements I.e protein and creatine but when I mentioned the supplements I was using it raised eyebrows. I am on Serious Mass, a mass gainer retailed by Holland and Barretts however it is not provided on the list of products on informed sports. I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of or knows of an individual being kicked out over use of a product that isn't listed on informed sports?
Hi, just a quick reply in case you are waiting for one; others will have more to say. From recollection, the relevant DIN is along the lines that if it isn't on the Informed Sports list, it's forbidden within the armed forces. The product you mention includes creatine in addition to protein, vitamins, etc. But it isn't a classified drug (eg anabolic steroids are a Class C drug). IF you have broken the rules, I would personally not expect it to result in discharge from what you say. Whatever you do, don't panic.
 
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Without wishing to be in any way funny about it, I think if I was part of your CoC I think I would be asking why you think you need dietary supplements? What is is that you’re not getting from the food available on camp?

In fact this potentially raises a much bigger issue within the army in these times of pay as you dine and more people eating in their billets or off-camp. A great many people coming into the forces have never been exposed to proper balanced diets (hardly a new thing) but perhaps it’s something that collectively ought to be looked at for the welfare of the troops. I don’t know how much PTi’s do about diet and nutrition in their training courses but perhaps healthy eating ought to be a significant part of their work within the unit as well?
 
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retailed by Holland and Barretts

I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of or knows of an individual being kicked out over use of a product that isn't listed on informed sports?

I doubt that there would be many ( unless they wanted rid of you ) who would be discharged for using legally bought ' Over the Counter ' supplements.

I hope you kept your receipts from Holland & Barrett.
 
I am a regular solider serving in an infantry battalion. I have been in over 2 years now and was faced with my first CDT in battalion on Monday. I am very paranoid about the result after comments made during the test from the ranking supervisors within the test site. I told them I am on dietary supplements I.e protein and creatine but when I mentioned the supplements I was using it raised eyebrows. I am on Serious Mass, a mass gainer retailed by Holland and Barretts however it is not provided on the list of products on informed sports. I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of or knows of an individual being kicked out over use of a product that isn't listed on informed sports?
Yes: 7 (Para) RHA soldiers dismissed for sports drug use – there’s much more to this story says military solicitor - Hilary Meredith Solicitors
 
. I don’t know how much PTi’s do about diet and nutrition in their training courses but perhaps healthy eating ought to be a significant part of their work within the unit as well?
There's a healthy eating component in MATTs specifically to address this.
 
You are responsible for what you put in your body; you've made the choice not to go with an item from the informed sports list, you'll own the consequences.

Oh, and if you're also doing anabolic steroids, you'll more than likely be kicked out.
 
Hi, just a quick reply in case you are waiting for one; others will have more to say. From recollection, the relevant DIN is along the lines that if it isn't on the Informed Sports list, it's forbidden within the armed forces. The product you mention includes creatine in addition to protein, vitamins, etc. But it isn't a classified drug (eg anabolic steroids are a Class C drug). IF you have broken the rules, I would personally not expect it to result in discharge from what you say. Whatever you do, don't panic.

I think the rule is that if its on informed sports its definitely not forbidden, you can take other stuff not on the list and be fine but equally you might fail a CDT.
 
Without wishing to be in any way funny about it, I think if I was part of your CoC I think I would be asking ask you think you need dietary supplements? What is is that you’re not getting from the food available on camp?

In fact this potentially raises a much bigger issue within the army in these times of pay as you dine and more people eating in their billets or off-camp. A great many people coming into the forces have never been exposed to proper balanced diets (hardly a new thing) but perhaps it’s something that collectively ought to be looked at for the welfare of the troops. I don’t know how much PTi’s do about diet and nutrition in their training courses but perhaps healthy eating ought to be a significant part of their work within the unit as well?

People have been using dietary supplements for years, if normal food was the answer, supplements wouldnt be a billion pound industry.

As a young soldier my food intake mainly consisted of takeaways and alcohol, I wouldnt have listened to a gym queen reciting a standard lecture.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
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I think the rule is that if its on informed sports its definitely not forbidden, you can take other stuff not on the list and be fine but equally you might fail a CDT.

Yep. Some supplements have contents that might show up on a CDT. If you only use stuff on the informed sport list then you'll avoid that risk, but using something off the list isn't banned and won't be an issue unless it contains something dodgy.
 
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I am very paranoid about the result after comments made during the test from the ranking supervisors within the test site. I told them I am on dietary supplements I.e protein and creatine but when I mentioned the supplements I was using it raised eyebrows.
It's one of life's lessons mate; don't potentially empower people with superfluous information about yourself as there are more people out there content to land you in the poo than look after your interests.

You'll be fine. Protein is a macro nutrient essential to life (duh) and creatine is a naturally occurring compound in both food and your body as part of your metabolism/ muscle energy production (creatine phosphate > ATP synthesis).

It's garbage from Holland & Barrett anyway, not like you've ordered from one of those dodgy online companies that potentially lace their products with illegal stimulants, prohormones etc. I'd recommend ordering from MyProtein tbh, they run sales every other day, you can get a 5kg bag of protein for £45-50 and a kg of creatine for ~£10.
 
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CC_TA

LE
There's a healthy eating component in MATTs specifically to address this.
And there is Sodexo supplied food that absolutely doesn't address this.

...let's not even get started on the NAAFI with all it's healthy eating charts and posters when all they sell is sugar & fat.
 
Everyone knows the rules, it has been drummed in for years. If people take supplements fair enough, but if they're too stupid to confirm that it is safe for military rules and regulations, then tough shxt
 
I can't see how anything like this would flag up on a drugs of abuse screen(DOA). There are generally two components to a DOA. First is the confirmation that what you're actually testing is indeed pish fresh from source, hence the wee temperature strip on the sample bottle along with a watchful eye over your shoulder, sample should then be tested for urea & creatinine to establish if it is indeed urine. Second part is the drug screen itself, these are "generally" done as a first pass sweep either using lateral flow test or a generic wet chemistry test. Any suspect results generated via first pass should be confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry, which is nigh on infallible.

If H&B are selling it, only thing I can see popping up would be in the urea & creatinine test, you'll probably have a high urea, assuming you didn't drink loads before the test. But assuming you've not been taking anything "dodgy" it wouldn't flag up nor test positive on TMS.

However, would probably advise against excess protein intake in the long term, can knacker your liver and kidneys.
 
hence the wee temperature strip on the sample bottle along with a watchful eye over your shoulder,

Ive never understood why after all these years the army still hasn't caught on that it could be your mate willy watching and helping you blag the test.
 
People have been using dietary supplements for years, if normal food was the answer, supplements wouldnt be a billion pound industry.

As a young soldier my food intake mainly consisted of takeaways and alcohol, I wouldnt have listened to a gym queen reciting a standard lecture.
People have been mincing about with protein shakes for a few years. It's only a billion pound industry because people want to show off.

See also bottled water.
 
However, would probably advise against excess protein intake in the long term, can knacker your liver and kidneys.
That nonsense was disproved ages ago much like dietary cholesterol (DoNt EaT tOo MaNy EgGs!!1one) correlating to blood serum cholesterol across healthy populations for both arguments.
 
People have been mincing about with protein shakes for a few years. It's only a billion pound industry because people want to show off.

See also bottled water.

Lots of people use supplements. Not all of them are flash *******. Especially the tubby cnuts trying using those grenade weight lose pills.
 
That nonsense was disproved ages ago much like dietary cholesterol (DoNt EaT tOo MaNy EgGs!!1one) correlating to blood serum cholesterol across healthy populations for both arguments.

There are several circumstances where excess protein consumption can have an adverse impact on health, especially in instances where there is an undiagnosed pre-existing condition.
 

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