Is 'Gentrification' a bad thing?

#1
I was reading this yesterday - 'In three years we'll probably be in the job centre' and I notice that, particularly in London that many get up in arms about the gentrification of their neighbourhoods.
Run down areas suddenly attracting better educated, better employed, motivated and above all, law abiding residents.
And this is seen as a bad thing!
I can appreciate that given the poor regulation of the rental housing market it will force many out if they are not in social housing, but given the condition of the area described in the article above (the Elephant and Castle) surely the only chance for improving their 'community' is for better behaved people to move in who will look after it much better?
Given the partial failure of modern social housing policy where 'x' amount of houses in new estates are designated for affordable housing (which pisses off those who just spent 250k on a house next door) in the vain hope that being in the vicinity of hardworking, honest people will rub off on the morlocks who have parked their clapped out Transit on the road outside their new leaded glass front window, is it better to let market forces work to improve an area?
Does it even work?
But what would I know? I live in Preston where the only indicator of gentrification is that the local chippy has a new fryer and the gravy is of a higher standard.
 
#2
From the E and C southbound to the Oval -can't remember if they're old LCC or Guinness Trust flats-that little area is Colombian narco turf I mean students , cleaners, vibrant Latino culture quarter which we should be embracing.
With death from above. Seriously, London , I've shit it.
 
#3
A lot of deprived areas are where London's culture originated from as struggling artists look for somewhere affordable to live

Whilst gentrification helps areas economically, it can also suck the life out of them filling them with identikit corporate shopping experiences and hipsters ending up diluting the culture
 
Last edited:
#4
"Gentrification" is a polite way of saying that we're going to put a bulldozer through the slums, because that's effectively what a lot of these areas have become. Oh the quaint little shops and stalls may look great when you're visiting an area looking to rub shoulders with the locals, and if you're lucky they smile at you and just take your cash rather than your whole wallet. I was in London a couple of years ago and my wife wanted to visit Lewisham because her dad grew up there, we were politely advised that it would not be a good idea seeing as we were the wrong colour skin / ethnic group / language.

If they do this then the area will have a stack of new shops and houses, and the prices will rocket. The downside is that all the current residents will be shifted somewhere else, to create new "ethnically diverse" areas which in years to come will be ripe for gentrification.

It's been happening for years, only they had a different name for knocking down rows of little rabbit hutches with no indoor toilets and building tower blocks in the 60's.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#5
City areas are always moving in and out of fashion as some rise others slide. Usually it is arty types (broke) who move in , good cafes and small shops and galleries attract young professionals and then the less adventurous etc etc.
Alternatively perhaps gentrification is when cavalry officers move into a garrison mess while theirs is refurbished ?
1520989340139.png
 
#6
My neighborhood is in the throes of being gentrified; no ones been shot outside my house for over a year and we have a small cafe nearby that sells artisanal bread and kombucha. Can’t complain really.
 
#7
A lot of deprived areas are where London's culture originated from as struggling artists look for somewhere affordable to live

Whilst gentrification helps areas economically, it can also such the life out of them filling them with identikit corporate shopping experiences and hipsters ending up diluting the culture
Not much has changed apart from ‘struggling artists’ have been replaced by “aspiring rappers”.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#8
visit Lewisham because her dad grew up there, we were politely advised that it would not be a good idea seeing as we were the wrong colour skin / ethnic group / language.
I'm calling bollocks there, I've lived in around Lewisham for the past 18 years, never had a problem and I'm what considered as a WASP.
 
#9
I'm calling bollocks there, I've lived in around Lewisham for the past 18 years, never had a problem and I'm what considered as a WASP.
That maybe the case, but all I'm saying is that the was the advice I was given at the time. I got as far as getting a taxi to take us to one of the local shopping centres but when I told the driver where I wanted to go he strongly advised against it. Not knowing hte area or the background I wasn't going to question it.
 
#10
I suppose the question is what is community and do we need it for a healthy society?

If you have lived in an area all your life, have deep family and community ties and suddenly you are seeing your children being priced out of the property market and instead of Mohamed's corner shop you have a cereal bar or a board games and craft beer boutique run by ******* idiots gentrification may not seem appealing.

Crime down and groovy ambience up is great if you can afford to live there/pay insane prices just to get on the treadmill of property ownership

The military are renowned for being entrench/steeped in culture and tradition and adverse to change, will be interested to see opinions of "gentrification"
 
#11
"Gentrification" is a polite way of saying that we're going to put a bulldozer through the slums, because that's effectively what a lot of these areas have become. Oh the quaint little shops and stalls may look great when you're visiting an area looking to rub shoulders with the locals, and if you're lucky they smile at you and just take your cash rather than your whole wallet. I was in London a couple of years ago and my wife wanted to visit Lewisham because her dad grew up there, we were politely advised that it would not be a good idea seeing as we were the wrong colour skin / ethnic group / language.

If they do this then the area will have a stack of new shops and houses, and the prices will rocket. The downside is that all the current residents will be shifted somewhere else, to create new "ethnically diverse" areas which in years to come will be ripe for gentrification.

It's been happening for years, only they had a different name for knocking down rows of little rabbit hutches with no indoor toilets and building tower blocks in the 60's.
Utter To55.

Whoever told you to avoid that area was not a local. I've lived in Lewisham since i was 10 - after moving up from Bermondsey with my family - Mum, Dad, Sister, brother - as part of the slum clearance in the late 60's/early 70's .

Whole streets where we used to live are now under the lake in Burgess Park although the Coburg Rd skool ( we lived about 20 m away from it) is still there.

From my early memory, Lewisham has always been about 50/50 white/non white..mainly West Indian/African and it still is....you've as much chance as being robbed there as any other place....so make of that what you will.

To have the scardy cat fear that it's like down town Mogadishu or a Brazilian Barrio is totally wrong, although like most places, if you want to wander around late at night or in the early hours, semi pi55ed and unprepared mentally of physically for a bit of agg , then you may get what you've set yourself up to get.

However, like you, having a fear of a place or an environment that you're not familiar with is natural .....especially, if you a bit of a wimp.

Lewisham and Peckham has been building new hi rise rabbit hutches and attracting mainly white, trendy, beardy wannabe hipsters & snowflakes and nice middle class dozy bints for a good while now....... i wouldn't call it Gentrification as a) they dress like tramps b) it's mainly souless corporate tower blocks filled with souless corporate cocks who bring to the area's a jack, drama queen, unjustified sense of cleverness.....

Go to a Reggae pub/event now and it's filled with the feckers , was a time that these places were spot de whiteman and had the raw vibe and energy that added to the scene....now? shite vibe for shite people..... Grrrrr!
 
Last edited:
#13
Utter To55.

Whoever told you to avoid that area was not a local. I've lived in Lewisham since i was 10 - after moving up from Bermondsey with my family - Mum, Dad, Sister, brother - as part of the slum clearance in the late 60's/early 70's .

Whole streets where we used to live are now under the lake in Burgess Park although the Coburg Rd skool ( we lived about 20 m away from it) is still there.

From my early memory, Lewisham has always been about 50/50 white/non white..mainly West Indian/African and it still is....you've as much chance as being robbed there as any other place....so make of that what you will.

To have the scardy cat fear that it's like down town Mogadishu or a Brazilian Barrio is totally wrong, although like most places, if you want to wander around late at night or in the early hours, semi pi55ed and unprepared mentally of physically for a bit of agg , then you may get what you've set yourself up to get.

However, like you, having a fear of a place or an environment that you're not familiar with is natural .....especially, if you a bit of a wimp.

Lewisham and Peckham has been building new hi rise rabbit hutches and attracting mainly white, trendy, beardy wannabe hipsters & snowflakes and nice middle class dozy bints for a good while now....... i wouldn't call it Gentrification as a) they dress like tramps b) it's mainly souless corporate tower blocks filled with souless corporate cocks who bring to the area's a jack, drama queen, unjustified sense of cleverness.....

Go to a Reggae pub/event now and it's filled with the feckers , was a time that these places were spot de whiteman and had the raw vibe and energy that added to the scene....now? shite vibe for shite people..... Grrrrr!
Now what did I get from that post?
If you go out at night expect to be attacked.
If you are old, weak or female then be scared of the place.
The local chav feckwits are being priced out of the place by civilised humans and you are upset by this.

Reggae bars are playing music you don't like so it is shit.

I think the original bit about not going anywhere near the place is still sound advice.
 
#15
Utter To55.

Whoever told you to avoid that area was not a local. I've lived in Lewisham since i was 10 - after moving up from Bermondsey with my family - Mum, Dad, Sister, brother - as part of the slum clearance in the late 60's/early 70's .

Whole streets where we used to live are now under the lake in Burgess Park although the Coburg Rd skool ( we lived about 20 m away from it) is still there.

From my early memory, Lewisham has always been about 50/50 white/non white..mainly West Indian/African and it still is....you've as much chance as being robbed there as any other place....so make of that what you will.

To have the scardy cat fear that it's like down town Mogadishu or a Brazilian Barrio is totally wrong, although like most places, if you want to wander around late at night or in the early hours, semi pi55ed and unprepared mentally of physically for a bit of agg , then you may get what you've set yourself up to get.

However, like you, having a fear of a place or an environment that you're not familiar with is natural .....especially, if you a bit of a wimp.

Lewisham and Peckham has been building new hi rise rabbit hutches and attracting mainly white, trendy, beardy wannabe hipsters & snowflakes and nice middle class dozy bints for a good while now....... i wouldn't call it Gentrification as a) they dress like tramps b) it's mainly souless corporate tower blocks filled with souless corporate cocks who bring to the area's a jack, drama queen, unjustified sense of cleverness.....

Go to a Reggae pub/event now and it's filled with the feckers , was a time that these places were spot de whiteman and had the raw vibe and energy that added to the scene....now? shite vibe for shite people..... Grrrrr!
So you agree with dicky ticker :mrgreen::mrgreen:

You make your existence sound like you need the mentality of an antelope visiting a lions watering hole,

You realise that isn’t a common experience amongst the majority of UK citizens ?
 
#16
I suppose the question is what is community and do we need it for a healthy society?

If you have lived in an area all your life, have deep family and community ties and suddenly you are seeing your children being priced out of the property market and instead of Mohamed's corner shop you have a cereal bar or a board games and craft beer boutique run by ******* idiots gentrification may not seem appealing.

Crime down and groovy ambience up is great if you can afford to live there/pay insane prices just to get on the treadmill of property ownership

The military are renowned for being entrench/steeped in culture and tradition and adverse to change, will be interested to see opinions of "gentrification"


Depends which "community" you want to weep for, and how you see their rights transcending the rights of others.

None of the "communities" in London are there by ancient right - most of them have in fact displaced earlier communities, who in turn displaced earlier communities. "Mohamed's corner shop" probably used to be "John Smith Grocers est 1850", or similar...

Modern mass immigration has replaced and greatly increased much of the population of London. If you have "lived there all your life", you are probably only 20 anyway. Your parents or grandparents probably grew up on the other side of the planet.
 
#17
My neighborhood is in the throes of being gentrified; no ones been shot outside my house for over a year and we have a small cafe nearby that sells artisanal bread and kombucha. Can’t complain really.
Didn't George Harrison organise a concert for that place? I'm sure I've got the CD somewhere.
 
#18
Perhaps it's just the subconscious fear from the current residents that they will suddenly find out just how bad they actually are?
I'd imagine that suddenly finding yourselves surrounded by employed, law abiding, motivated citizens must come as quite a shock to many.
 
#19
Gentrification is a good thing. Most of the blame for problems (by which I mean actual problems, not matters of personal taste) attributed to gentrification should be directed elsewhere, such as cheap housing shortages being due to overly-restrictive zoning laws, disincentives for property owners to develop their properties to provide more housing, poorly-conceived council housing policies, etc.

ETA: I think this article is worth your time if you are a subscriber.
 
Last edited:
#20
My neighborhood is in the throes of being gentrified; no ones been shot outside my house for over a year and we have a small cafe nearby that sells artisanal bread and kombucha. Can’t complain really.
Anyone that calls handmade bread 'artisanal' needs to be repeatedly punched in the face until they ******* die. Just for being a ****.
 

Similar threads

Top