Is being a civvy better or easier than you expected?

ugly

LE
Moderator
Having spent twice as long out as I did in I now no longer class myself as an ex anything. I was fortunate in that my not to be scared of challenges instilled in me nby the constant testing enviroment that I was brought up in IJLB and 1LI has given me a fgood outlook. Yes I did PVR and it was the right time for me. I enjoyed some difficulties that perhaps redundancy would have alleviated yet it all made me stronger. At secondary school in the 3rd year when I was asked what career I wished to have and Welbeck and Shrivenam Loomed large I took the intellectually soft option and became a grunt. Now to quote one of my former NCO's who visited me after his 22 were up; bloody hell you earn more than a Brigadier and dont have to stay away at night for it!"
life is what you make it. I now know what I want to do for a career and as I am nearly 40 I wish to farm in Canada. So Mr Jenkins my career master can you sort me out an interview please!
 
FREE AT LAST!!!!! :) :D :) :D

I loved the military life, the sense of purpose and, most of all, the excellent people I worked with - not just UK but NATO and elsewhere.

What became intolerable was the sense that we were becoming (Bliar's) Mussolini's Italian Army to (Dubya's) Hitler's Wehrmacht - stretching it quite a bit, but Abu Ghraib and other instances reinforce this impression that we were not quite doing the right thing anymore and the propaganda lies we get from Bliar mean that he simply cannot be followed in future. This was paired with the management-b@llocks and cuts inflicted on us which simply make no sense at all and the constant cycle of doing more with even less. The MoD and the government are the sh!ttiest bunch of liars there have ever been and do not deserve the calibre of self-sacrificing dedicated people that they have and that they seem bent on exploiting to the maximum.

And that's another thing - you can say what you want, when you want (at least until Blunkett has his way). :twisted:
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
MrPVRd said:
FREE AT LAST!!!!! :) :D :) :D

I loved the military life, the sense of purpose and, most of all, the excellent people I worked with - not just UK but NATO and elsewhere.

What became intolerable was the sense that we were becoming (Bliar's) Mussolini's Italian Army to (Dubya's) Hitler's Wehrmacht - stretching it quite a bit, but Abu Ghraib and other instances reinforce this impression that we were not quite doing the right thing anymore and the propaganda lies we get from Bliar mean that he simply cannot be followed in future. This was paired with the management-b@llocks and cuts inflicted on us which simply make no sense at all and the constant cycle of doing more with even less. The MoD and the government are the sh!ttiest bunch of liars there have ever been and do not deserve the calibre of self-sacrificing dedicated people that they have and that they seem bent on exploiting to the maximum.

And that's another thing - you can say what you want, when you want (at least until Blunkett has his way). :twisted:

Agree with all of that. Just be canny about your reserve commitment. Having PVR'd I was determined that there was no way the B*stards had any call on my time. They got away with broken promises and lies for my 7 years so why should I having bought out of that contract be committed to more for less. In my case a rather painful and life threatening car crash sorted out my medical discharge from the reserves. Fisrt thing I did on getting out of hospital was to call IMRO. Stick that in your pipe and smoke it. I may be 30% disabled but at least I am free. What riled the most was when my employer during Granby asked me how many reservists were in his firm and how many could we let go on call up. I said not my job to know. Tell that to an officer!
 

doctordeath

Old-Salt
Having done 17 years and then Pvr'd because the rank structure in the RAMC was down to 5 commisions a year. It has been the best move I have ever made. The Army gave me the strength of character, self disapline and the "see a problem sort it first then tell them how it got fixed attitude". This has stood me in great stead and to be honest I find my job in Civvi street a piece of piss in comparison to the shit i used get saddled with. Earning at least twice the amount I was and see alot more of my family!!!! Thanks to the system for the way I am now!!! Thank god I left it!! But lads if you have the same values Civvi street will love you. :lol:
 
I am now a med student. Anyways, I met my cadaver. Due to the grin on her face I insisted to the (group) of 18 yr old girls and boys I'm in that we call her after a well known PM's wife. It was an odd feeling cutting out her heart after removing the lungs and ribcage. We cut throught he ribs with something that resembeled a pait of tin snips.
 
In practical terms, I'm better out than in. I do miss the comradeship and standards of one's team mates one found in service life. On balance, I'd be happy in as much as out.
We old and bold investigators refer to ourselves not as ex- but as former SIB.
 

flip

Crow
Great out here and would not want back. Just got sick of tours, duty etc etc. Work is not hard to find if you make yourself the right person just dont expect the world to come knocking at your door, there is not much call out here for a good man with a bayonet! Took a small drop in pay but I get to sleep at home every night and I choose the people I associate with every day. Couple of bits of advice for what they are worth, buy a house as soon as you can so your mortgage is on the way before you go out and try to get some real civvi qualifications. Doesnt matter really what they are, employers want to know you can learn and that you are willing to put yourself out to better yourself.
 

flip

Crow
Great out here and would not want back. Just got sick of tours, duty etc etc. Work is not hard to find if you make yourself the right person just dont expect the world to come knocking at your door, there is not much call out here for a good man with a bayonet! Took a small drop in pay but I get to sleep at home every night and I choose the people I associate with every day. Couple of bits of advice for what they are worth, buy a house as soon as you can so your mortgage is on the way before you go out and try to get some real civvi qualifications. Doesnt matter really what they are, employers want to know you can learn and that you are willing to put yourself out to better yourself.
 
flip said:
Great out here and would not want back. Just got sick of tours, duty etc etc. Work is not hard to find if you make yourself the right person just dont expect the world to come knocking at your door, there is not much call out here for a good man with a bayonet! Took a small drop in pay but I get to sleep at home every night and I choose the people I associate with every day. Couple of bits of advice for what they are worth, buy a house as soon as you can so your mortgage is on the way before you go out and try to get some real civvi qualifications. Doesnt matter really what they are, employers want to know you can learn and that you are willing to put yourself out to better yourself.
I agree wholeheatedly about the house purchase comment. I can't help feel though that anyone getting out, even after 22 years, regardless of rank would have difficulty finding decent housing for the money they will have. As the old boys advice I was given as a sprog in the mid 80's to buy a house was ignored It is now far to late for young soldiers to do this now.
 
Some good advice in this thread, but dont take it all to heart about how good it is being out, for everyone who posts how good it is, i would suggest there is a lot more who are regretting the decision to leave HMF.

There are plenty of people who have always been civvies who cannot afford a house, why should squaddies expect to be able to afford them as well?
it is not a God given right that jsut because we served that we should be better off than others..
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
One of the problems is that the average young Tom, doesn't prepare himself for civvy street and usually leaves prospectless(is that a word?), skint and in the huff. I'm not directing that to all of them, but there are a lot in that category. They leave with no plans for the future and no real financial backing, bar the last months wages to support themselves 'in between' jobs. Few have received any advice that they are prepared to listen too. Most head off back to Mum & Dad as they haven't got the readies for thier own place. Bear in mind here that the average Toms career is 4.6 yrs. They don't all hang around for 12, 15 and 22 yrs. Most will have joined at 18 and will leave around 23 yrs of age.

The Army isn't the worlds best employer, it's far from it. One of the earlier posters pointed out that he had spent 8 yrs doing a degree only to have it ignored by the Army. I know how you feel mate, but if you look around, there's lots of ORs doing/possessing degrees and other higher education qualifications. It's quite commonplace nowadays for Toms to be more academically and vocationally qualified than their officers. What the Army does have going for it though and what is generally ignored by most, is easy access to academic/vocational courses. I've been in and out of the Army and none of my civvy employers offered what the Army does and in most cases for free. Most young Toms won't ever visit their Education Centres, yet AECs offer many courses which could set the young Tom up for civvy street or at least point him in the right direction.

Units should also take more interest in the 'short timers' and as opposed to just allowing a squaddie to bail out, units should be more proactive in assisting their departure by spelling out to the soldier just what's on offer, beyond the standard attempts to keep them 'soldiering on'. There is very little interest by units in those who leave at a young age and this is wrong. Those who leave at an early age are treat like expendables and this treatment serves only to hurry the soldier out.


My advice to anyone considering early departure is to hold on for 12 months to 2 yrs. This isn't some recruiting drive for the Mob, far from it. Have a gander at your local AEC and put in for every course you beleive will aid your future as a civvy. Get all your applications in and get yourself trained for another job whilst the Army still pays you. 2 yrs isn't a long time, it won't kill you. What else would you be doing? You don't have to do a degree, but you can get an NVQ or an IT qualification or a language qualification. There's lots more to it, but you have to drag yourself to the AEC. If you've got an idea what you want to do when you leave, get yourself some information on it and make contact with prospective employers. ASk what they are looking for and whether the qualifications you are doing be the right ones? IS there anything else you should be doing? Let them know that you will be out in a short time and ask if its OK to send your CV nearer your discharge date. YOu can learn how to write a decent CV at the AEC...bonus?

If you've made your mind up, you've made your mind up, just don't run off as quick as you can. Get your plan together, use the facilities that the Army provides, set your goals and get your head down and graft . This time though, you'll be grafting for yourself. It'll be all in your own time, but it's for you, not the Army. Why leave skint, without prospects and fed up at 23, when you can leave with some savings, qualifications and with a more positive outlook at 25?

A full career isn't every ones cup of tea, it is accepted that most will leave early, but why ignore what this firm is giving away? It's madness to leave without any qualifications, particularly when they are so easily accessible.
 
Get your Enhanced Learning Credit, due to be worth £2,000 per year over 6 years by 2008! :twisted:

That is assuming you have signed up in 2000 and have done 8 years. I think if you signed up in 2004 you get £1,000 pa; thereore 4 years earns you 3 grand.
 
Nice post B-AB!

Just to add to that, if you're in the bracket of getting out at 23, look at what there is on offer elsewhere in the Army!! Many feel disillusioned, peed off and fed up. Yep, it happens everywhere, but a change is as good as a rest. Consider a 'new' career within the Army, even if it's just as a stopgap. 23 is still mega-young, it's fully possible to swap capbadges, get more quals (Engrs as an Example) and bag yourself a whole new field of expertise. We've had lads come from Infantry, do the training and after a while in service leave the Army with a full ticket for operating Cranes (ferinstance) Something they would never have had (or afforded) in Civi street. 12 years in the Army is fek all when you've joined young, and you can still have a bloody good civi career after. Make the change and then treat it as 5 or 6 years resettlement. gear for Civistreet. Get courses in, then when you do get out, youve more 'proper' resettlement to play with to further widen your employability.


Im now on the last 6 years of 22, and all courses I do are purely done on civi qual merit. If I cant transfer it to a civilian Qual, I will avoid doing it. Most of the stuff though does have a civi 'cross-reference'
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I ran into an ex teeny weeny airways pilot whilst working as a temp with a multinational. he asked me why I wouldnt go permanent staff?
I said that after years of doing as i was told because the buggers watched me I decided that I wanted the opportunity to say stick your job up your arse and mean and not lose any pension etc into the bargain. I think he was pissed off a little as I took home nearly 3 times as much as him and he effectively had to work for me. Oddly enough the very nice man baled shortly after!
Endex!
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top