Is being a civvy better or easier than you expected?

Prodigal said:
Be very careful before you go self-employed though - honour and integrity and keeping your word mean very little to the people you will end up negotiating with! But the fact it means something to you will be one of your biggest plus points, ironically.
Very true. Whilst you do have to be careful about being shafted, as someones "word" can mean very little in civvy street, your "word" can very quickly mean a hell of a lot to a punter when they realise that unlike the majority of contractors, you actually mean it.
 
You miss the point. When a punter asks for something at 5 oclock on a Friday afternoon, on the phone, 20 miles away from your office so that signing for it isn't possible, it doesn't take them long to figure out that when you say you'll do it, then you actually will.

Apart from situations like that though, I agree, get it on paper every time.
 
Aunty Stella said:
You miss the point. When a punter asks for something at 5 oclock on a Friday afternoon, on the phone, 20 miles away from your office so that signing for it isn't possible, it doesn't take them long to figure out that when you say you'll do it, then you actually will.

Apart from situations like that though, I agree, get it on paper every time.
1700hrs on a Friday afternoon you mean.

20 miles away is nowt. What happens when one of the fcukers gets nicked at 0200hrs on a Saturday morning? Do you fcuk them off? Or are you paid 24/7? Do you drag your scabby arrse out of bed to sort it out or do you leave it to someone else to take the sheeite when they complain to their brief?

No - you do it. I can't wait to be a traffic warden.......
 
After commissioning in 2001, I now find myself as a civvie again, having achieved all I wanted in the forces. Don't get me wrong, I loved the job and the life but felt that I had to do something different and am now heading to Uni next month - I get to do the 18 yr old thing again as a 26 yr old!

What I am sure of however is that the work ethic and discipline instilled when wearing green will be of assistance whilst studying over the next few years.

Has anyone else on here gone to University after having served? How did you find it?
 
Just about to return to full time study after a milirary career as a rankrer and as a commissioned officer, and a pre-military stint as an undergraduate.

The military experience seems to be highly valued by academia. I think that ex-military students (of all ranks) find it easier to quickly sift through evidence and identify and focus on what is important and discard what is not, and are also far more able to present an argument clearly and logically than their non-military contemporaries, whether in the written or spoken medium. These are all requirements of academic discipline, whether in the sciences or arts.

Being older and wiser makes life easier, particularly as many 18 year old students are more keen on p!ssing their grant away - I speak from experience! And, of course, there are few comparable areas of life in which you quickly gain wisdom and life experience than wearing Her Majesty's uniform!

There are some pitfalls, for example do not to try and present written work in any of the defence writing/staff formats. It does not work, whether for an arts paper or a scientific paper - I have tried it! :oops: Also, academics tend to be left-wing and may have preconceptions about ex-military, particularly after Telic, but it is not that difficult to acquire a convincing Bliar-hating air! Finally, there is a serious amount of what may be seen as complete waffle, particularly from a PC-perspective. However, anyone with recent military service, and particularly with exposure to MoD, will recognise this and will probably know how to at least pay lip-service! It is in the nature of any institution or discipline to build up an esoteric, inaccessible and exclusive language and academia and the military share this unfortunate trait!
 

Eggbanjo

War Hero
Did my degree after being out of the mob three years, having joined up at 16 without any meaningful education quals it was a big decision to go for a full time degree.

Everyones circumstances are different for me it was a choice between earning money or living off grants and loans, having to work every holiday, wife holding down two jobs, mortgage, kid etc etc for three a year period. Not easy but it was the right one as it has paid off now, if I had pulled out for any reason at least I could say I'd given it a go.

While a student I never had the money to p iss up the wall and living twenty miles away from Uni kept me out of the way so it was basically nose to the grind stone and crack on. My motivation was different to the other students, for many of them it was an excuse for a p iss up with the last year where any effort was put in. If I failed it was back on the shovel for good.

I never had any probs with the Uni staff for being ex forces quite the opposite actually, they gave me added support and wanted me to do well. Also being 26 I was on average five years older than most of the students so had got my 'sensible' head on by then 8O

My advice, go for it.
 
Cheers for that chaps! The only thing I can see being a serious distraction are the student nurses I am sure to (or is that intend to!!) get a decent bit of contact with..... :D
 

Exmarine

War Hero
I joined up to go away a lot and leave the area where I lived and never considered money that much.

Friendship a healthy life style and experiences were my main sense of fulfilment and still are.

It cannot be all roses but no regrets.

I will never be a civvy.

Chris
 
Exmarine said:
I joined up to go away a lot and leave the area where I lived and never considered money that much.

Friendship a healthy life style and experiences were my main sense of fulfilment and still are.

It cannot be all roses but no regrets.

I will never be a civvy.

Chris
I admire the sentiment.

How, precisely will you never be a civvy. Surely every soldier will be, once the army no longer has a need for thrm. Having read the thread it has further convinced me to work a little bit harder in getting relavent civilian qualfications for preparation into the real world.

I will be a civvy..................so will you.........one day.
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
Being a civvy is far more interesting than I thought it could ever be. I have been out for a year now and do not miss the back to back tours Dui-Lia talks about with suh fondness!

It helps having a job I should have got years ago when I had the opportunity.

Be aware, you do go through the mourning period when you wonder what you have lost. But you get over it when all the 'mates' you thought you had have moved on and that doesnt include you! I was told by a LD SSM, "being in the Army, is like a hand in a bucket of water- take the hand out and the water and bucket still remains"

It was great doing the 24 years, but its even better looking back, saying what a good time I had, plus some mates are still mates!

Oh and only join the TA if you 'really, really' miss the Army! I did and got a tour in Iraq for my troubles! :lol:
 
Sammy The Cat said:
Exmarine said:
I joined up to go away a lot and leave the area where I lived and never considered money that much.

Friendship a healthy life style and experiences were my main sense of fulfilment and still are.

It cannot be all roses but no regrets.

I will never be a civvy.

Chris
I admire the sentiment.

How, precisely will you never be a civvy. Surely every soldier will be, once the army no longer has a need for thrm. Having read the thread it has further convinced me to work a little bit harder in getting relavent civilian qualfications for preparation into the real world.

I will be a civvy..................so will you.........one day.
He won't...........he's going to refuse gardening leave and is planning to commit suicide the day before his 22 yrs point.

Whataguy!
 
Exmarine said:
I joined up to go away a lot and leave the area where I lived and never considered money that much.

Friendship a healthy life style and experiences were my main sense of fulfilment and still are.

It cannot be all roses but no regrets.

I will never be a civvy.

Chris
I joined with the aim to get away from my home town and travel the world too, this I did, but please don't not make the mistake of thinking the party will last forever or you will be one of those sad people who don't even turn up for their own leaving do, and go into denial about the end of their service. I've known people who at the end of their 22 found themselves unqualified with no house or plan of what to do. The army pension is fine, so long as you have another job to back it up with. As someone posted here some time ago. The army is a club. the minute you hand in your membership card all club privaleges are revoked. I jope you will face reality, or when they start to lay off people and your name comes up you may be sorrier than you'll ever know.
 

tankieboy

War Hero
Worse thing I ever did was leave the Army.

I have now been out over four years. The only good thing I have is my baby girl.

No job, no real qualifications, no home, no money and in debt to my eyes.

Yeah life on Civvy Street is ******* A.
 

Red-On

Old-Salt
tankieboy said:
Worse thing I ever did was leave the Army.

I have now been out over four years. The only good thing I have is my baby girl.

No job, no real qualifications, no home, no money and in debt to my eyes.

Yeah life on Civvy Street is * A.
So why don't you rejoin or go TA and get an "s" type engagement??

There is no guarntees when you leave the mob, I ve been out four years now and did find it tough in the beginning but after application and hard work have fought through and have good quals and a well paying job..anyone can do it its that simple

I agree with exmarine in part if you enjoyed your time in the mob it will always remain part of you till you feed the worms however some blokes don't move on - your out focus on your new life and you will thrive, live in the past and you'll become a bitter and twisted dinosaur just like the SQMS !!
 

tankieboy

War Hero
I do not think I live in the past but I do miss it.

Its hard with a young family out here and no money or prospects.

No offence but my local TA is REME and I do not fancy that. I think I would be lost forever is I did any service.
 
tankieboy said:
I do not think I live in the past but I do miss it.

Its hard with a young family out here and no money or prospects.

No offence but my local TA is REME and I do not fancy that. I think I would be lost forever is I did any service.
I hate to sound like an old man, but being young is hard full stop. There arn't the comfortable wages available that many would have you belive until later on. In my job most people are in their early to late 30's and are earning almost double what an entry level youngster earns, simply because of the experience we have aquired.
Yes, it can be hard a a civvy, but it can also be a complete doddle so long as you plan and plly yourself.
I'm sorry to here you are having it bad now, but it won't always be like that if you look towards the future.
 

tankieboy

War Hero
Speedy said:
tankieboy said:
I do not think I live in the past but I do miss it.

Its hard with a young family out here and no money or prospects.

No offence but my local TA is REME and I do not fancy that. I think I would be lost forever is I did any service.
I hate to sound like an old man, but being young is hard full stop. There arn't the comfortable wages available that many would have you belive until later on. In my job most people are in their early to late 30's and are earning almost double what an entry level youngster earns, simply because of the experience we have aquired.
Yes, it can be hard a a civvy, but it can also be a complete doddle so long as you plan and plly yourself.
I'm sorry to here you are having it bad now, but it won't always be like that if you look towards the future.
See thats the sad truth. I am 31 ffs. :wink:
 
Would they allow you to re-enlist? As someone who has been out a while you and your family could enjoy the benifits the army has to offer with the hindsight that civvy street has given you, such as saving some of your wages and not taking everything for granted whilst still complaining about it.
 

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