is a career in the police a suitable option for a Ex Soldier

#1
With a lot of guys leaving because of AFG and looking for a job with a bit of interest is it a good idea to apply to join the police force. Or do the police operate under a different moral code
 
#2
Just wondering have you served in ghanners?Would you think it is A good idea to join the plod?What is your 'moral code'?Basically why are you asking this stuff?
 
#3
If you are white, english, male, straight and without disability you won't have a cat in hell's chance of getting through the first sift of applicants.
 
#4
Mate, I joined the police after the army and am still in. Despite what you hear in the press regarding paperwork etc. you will love it. I cannot rate it highly enough as a career choice. When I joined up at 16, i thought the army would be all about the crack and excitement, although there were great times, these weren't the norm. In the police each day is varied and challenging, with good banter and plenty of excitement.
The only drama is getting in, you need to either be very switched on in terms of competency based assesments or know someone who has worked within the system and is familiar with the grading system. Please feel free to P.M me with any queries especially with regard to the application or assesment centre, I will sort you out.
Also give consideration to your choice of force, in Wales you have some very good forces. Although recruitment is limited. Give consideration to British Transport Police who operate in several of the major welsh cities, despite the slagging they are a top force.
As I say, please get in touch, there are several serving bobbies on this site who will also testify to the attributes of the job, despite figures, paperwork and political correctness it is one of the best I can imagine.
 
#5
Eerm, Bob, you fishing for a massive bite? Judging by your other posts
Should you have the testicles/ clitty poo, and moral fibre for a challenging and rewarding career at all levels , unless you start to progress through the ranks, I should say give it a go! You only have 2 years to find out if you cut the mustard. Private medical cover is a must though.
Considering it then?
 
#6
By the way me, and 85% of my team are straight white males and got in first time. Positive action was a very short lives concept in police recruitment, a number of successful legal challenges ensured that. However it is still a popular concept with every white straight male who fails the recruitment process.
 
#8
BobJamesCo:

Of course, I can only give you advice from an American's point of view; however, that said, IMO law enforcement, is a great profession to go into, from a military career if you can do it.

I was able to maintain both a career in LE and a career in the US Army Reserve, after serving full time in the military.

If your an 'adrenaline junkie,' like I was, you'll find many specialized units in LE, to keep your adrenaline flowing. In my time in LE, I rode motors, did rescue/recovery SCUBA diving, Bomb disposal as a police Bomb technician, SWAT and dignitary protection. I also made it from patrol officer to Captain, under civil service competitive testing.

At the same time, I was able to keep a position in a US Army Reserve Special Forces unit, keep SF MOS & Parachute qualified (Jump pay) and work towards a Reserve retirement from the Reserve. I was able to go from CPL to Master Sgt. rank in that unit.

Most of the larger 'Police Services' here in the USA, are also very good about allowing Reserves to attend required duties. They are also good at allowing one to take leave with out pay to attend military schools, elective tours of duty, etc.

I had to, as a SF soldier attend many schools and training courses without normal LE pay, (Leave of absence w/o pay.) although while on active duty for such schools and/or elective tours I got full military pay and bennies.

Most LE retirement plans here in the USA are far better than average Civilian retirement plans as are the benefits. I would suspect they would be good in the UK as well.

So, good luck if you go ahead with it! :wink:
 
#9
martin7606 said:
By the way me, and 85% of my team are straight white males and got in first time. Positive action was a very short lives concept in police recruitment, a number of successful legal challenges ensured that. However it is still a popular concept with every white straight male who fails the recruitment process.
Is this true in promotional exams as well? No affirmative action, PC stuff? Here now days, they can pick anywhere on the list to promote a woman or other race, etc. It used to be, that they had to pick the top people off the list. ....no more! :roll: :wink:
 
#11
What are the pension schemes like in teh Rzzers?

Complicated. Old scheme being phased out, relatively simple, pay 11% of each motnh's salary (ouch!) in, serve 30 years, retire on 2/3rds of final year pay as your annual pension or take a lump sum (just over twice last years salary) and smaller pension.

Bloke left Plod after 12 years, joined the railways, his accrued pension already exceeded that which a railwayman would put in over his entire working life to age 60. That 11% really does hurt.

New scheme hurts less, serve longer.

Join the Police, say what they want you to say in public, think whatever you want to think.
 
#12
BobJamesCo said:
With a lot of guys leaving because of AFG and looking for a job with a bit of interest is it a good idea to apply to join the police force. Or do the police operate under a different moral code
You sh:t stirring fecker, after what youve just been saying in the armed police thread :?

I like it for the most part, some days I hate what I do, some days I love it.

Just dont expect the same cameraderie.

and it's not a different moral code, it's a different discipline code, as long as you get used to the idea of in every incident you attende, in every action you take, the first thing to consider is how to cover your arrse and how not to get sacked, as someone, somewhere, will always be out for your legs.
 
#13
MadKev said:
What are the pension schemes like in teh Rzzers?

Complicated. Old scheme being phased out, relatively simple, pay 11% of each motnh's salary (ouch!) in, serve 30 years, retire on 2/3rds of final year pay as your annual pension or take a lump sum (just over twice last years salary) and smaller pension.

Bloke left Plod after 12 years, joined the railways, his accrued pension already exceeded that which a railwayman would put in over his entire working life to age 60. That 11% really does hurt.

New scheme hurts less, serve longer.

Join the Police, say what they want you to say in public, think whatever you want to think.
as a new entrant you'd be on the new pension scheme, pay less in (about 7 % IIRC) but work for longer - 35 years as opposed to 30 for full pension.
 
#14
MadKev said:
What are the pension schemes like in teh Rzzers?

Complicated. Old scheme being phased out, relatively simple, pay 11% of each motnh's salary (ouch!) in, serve 30 years, retire on 2/3rds of final year pay as your annual pension or take a lump sum (just over twice last years salary) and smaller pension.

Bloke left Plod after 12 years, joined the railways, his accrued pension already exceeded that which a railwayman would put in over his entire working life to age 60. That 11% really does hurt.

New scheme hurts less, serve longer.

Join the Police, say what they want you to say in public, think whatever you want to think.
that means my retired bro in law freemason chief inspector is on abot £40,000 a year pension plust the job he walked into when he left.
 
#15
Am not serving now and am out of date. I retired when all the touchy feely stuff was just coming in, so take what i say on this advisement.

The pension system is very good. It was 13 % of salary deducted for males when i left ( bizarely it was 11% for females). Even with the lower scheme contributions nowadays and the longer service, it is still valid. If you are young when you join like I was, it gives you the financial capability to go into another job when you leave and the experience to look at your new job from a different angle. I chose teaching which isn't that different really.

You will rely on a core group of colleagues ( not always friends) to watch your back. The disciplinary code is subject to double jeopardy and can be very harsh, especially if you step outside of the grey man syndrome and get noticed. I managed to get away with a few fines from my pay over the years but i was aware of people getting the sack ( one for not serving a summons.. and signing it off as served, one for not recording a lost dog owner telephone number.. dog destroyed). People also get sent to prison. If dishonest, they deserve it but sometimes, the area is grey, especially in assaults..so again as person above says, watch your back.

It can be very exciting and gives a great sense of value to the person doing it. Problems arise when you leave because you feel gutted without it. You also need to make sure you maintain fitness as the shifts will gut you if you don't, especially when you get past thirty. Also, if you live on or near your beat ( this probably doesn't happen now) be prepared for incoming and a little midnight off the record banter with the local populace.

Health and hospitalisation insurance are recommended. You can get these reasonably cheaply. Not like in the army.

Would suggest you have a bash. Just don't wear your mess dress at the policeman's ball, especially if it is at a higher rank than you are in the police.
 
#16
Trip_Wire said:
BobJamesCo:

Of course, I can only give you advice from an American's point of view; however, that said, IMO law enforcement, is a great profession to go into, from a military career if you can do it.

I was able to maintain both a career in LE and a career in the US Army Reserve, after serving full time in the military.

If your an 'adrenaline junkie,' like I was, you'll find many specialized units in LE, to keep your adrenaline flowing. In my time in LE, I rode motors, did rescue/recovery SCUBA diving, Bomb disposal as a police Bomb technician, SWAT and dignitary protection. I also made it from patrol officer to Captain, under civil service competitive testing.

At the same time, I was able to keep a position in a US Army Reserve Special Forces unit, keep SF MOS & Parachute qualified (Jump pay) and work towards a Reserve retirement from the Reserve. I was able to go from CPL to Master Sgt. rank in that unit.

Most of the larger 'Police Services' here in the USA, are also very good about allowing Reserves to attend required duties. They are also good at allowing one to take leave with out pay to attend military schools, elective tours of duty, etc.

I had to, as a SF soldier attend many schools and training courses without normal LE pay, (Leave of absence w/o pay.) although while on active duty for such schools and/or elective tours I got full military pay and bennies.

Most LE retirement plans here in the USA are far better than average Civilian retirement plans as are the benefits. I would suspect they would be good in the UK as well.

So, good luck if you go ahead with it! :wink:
amazing. is there anything you havent done?!
 
#17
ccfc1984:

amazing. is there anything you havent done?!
I tried not to miss anything worthwhile; however, I'm sure I must have missed a few things. In some cases, it might be good that I missed them. :roll:

Of course, my dual careers were not without there problems, especially with the family life, parenting and social activities, etc. As most know here that are in the military and or the police service, both activities can be very hard on marriages and a 'normal' family life.

I know, it cost me my first wife, after 17 years of marriage and four children. A large number (percentage) of American career military and/or police service people, have been divorced at least once, sometimes more.

In the police service it's the shift work, graveyard and swing shifts, as well as working holidays and weekends, etc. As well as in my case, being on 24/7 callouts, with pagers, etc. for the majority of my police career.

All that said, I've had a helluva of an interesting life and I'm still enjoying it! A little more sedate now days though! :wink:

I still SCUBA dive, mostly in tropical waters, I gave up on the '45 degree waters locally. I've hung up, parachuting and the other crazy things, since my retirements from the Army Reserve and LE.

I miss motorcycle riding once in awhile as I had a couple of my own after I rode one in LE. It's just gotten to be to dangerous to ride a street bike anymore and of course, ones reflexes tend to slow with age, etc.

Now days, I travel a lot usually on cruises. (Princess Cruise lines.)
 
#18
Trip_Wire said:
BobJamesCo:

Of course, I can only give you advice from an American's point of view; however, that said, IMO law enforcement, is a great profession to go into, from a military career if you can do it.

I was able to maintain both a career in LE and a career in the US Army Reserve, after serving full time in the military.

If your an 'adrenaline junkie,' like I was, you'll find many specialized units in LE, to keep your adrenaline flowing. In my time in LE, I rode motors, did rescue/recovery SCUBA diving, Bomb disposal as a police Bomb technician, SWAT and dignitary protection. I also made it from patrol officer to Captain, under civil service competitive testing.

At the same time, I was able to keep a position in a US Army Reserve Special Forces unit, keep SF MOS & Parachute qualified (Jump pay) and work towards a Reserve retirement from the Reserve. I was able to go from CPL to Master Sgt. rank in that unit.

Most of the larger 'Police Services' here in the USA, are also very good about allowing Reserves to attend required duties. They are also good at allowing one to take leave with out pay to attend military schools, elective tours of duty, etc.

I had to, as a SF soldier attend many schools and training courses without normal LE pay, (Leave of absence w/o pay.) although while on active duty for such schools and/or elective tours I got full military pay and bennies.

Most LE retirement plans here in the USA are far better than average Civilian retirement plans as are the benefits. I would suspect they would be good in the UK as well.

So, good luck if you go ahead with it! :wink:
Your like that fcuker off that weapon show who whenever and for no reason reminds the audience he was a seal, you manage it in almost all your posts their is nothing big nor special about being in ANY US force,except the coastal guard... that film 'The Guardian' was kosher!
then you answered the fella's question above in 7 simple words im not sure he wanted to know your life story :roll:
 
#19
callum13:

Interested in joining the police service are you?

I was trying to address people here, who are and were also former military, interested in joining the police.

I'm sorry if my post's bore you and that you have such a poor concept of the US Armed forces. Yes, the Coast Guard is a great Service; however, what was displayed in the movie, 'The Guardian' was only a very small segment of what that service does here in the USA. As for the other, of our Armed forces, I happen to think they are the best in the world, as are yours. I'm proud of my service with them.

I hate to bore you with more of my 'life story;' however, since you mentioned the USGG and the Guardian, which features the people who jump out of the Choppers to save people, etc. I tell you this little part of my 'life' experience, in that area. Mostly in the late 50's and into the early 70's.

You'll notice I mentioned that I was a Rescue/Recovery SCUBA diver for my LE Department. In Seattle, every summer in August we have a Gold Cup or Seafair Race on lake Washington. (Still do.) The race is run by Unlimited Hydroplane boats every year. Speeds of over 200 MPH are common now.

http://www.hydropoker.com/history-hydroplanes-poker.html

http://www.thunderboats.org/history/history0239.html

The USCG is in charge of public safety of these races, along with the LE agency that also covers the lake. In this case, on Lk. Washington this was my agency.

I was SCUBA diving for my LE department, during the period of 1956 to 1971. I was tasked to ride in the USCG helicopter, during the running of actually races and qualification runs, etc. for both Gold Cup and Seafair races, during those years

I wore full SCUBA gear. (My choice.) My mission, was to jump from the 'chopper hovering over a crash site and recover the hydro driver and get him into the basket-hoist for transportation and/or treatment. Sound familiar?

During the years that I was the one doing this, I was able to recover and rescue several hydro-drivers. Bill Muncy of Thriftway fame was one of them.

I chose to wear full SCUBA gear to include a 3MM wet-suit because of the chance of a fire, from the high octane aviation fuel used by the hydros. I was also aware, that I might have to spend time UW freeing or recovering the driver. Depths of the Lake could run from 90 to 600 feet on the course.

In most cases, my skin was irritated a few days, after a rescue from the amount of aviation fuel in the water at the crash site. It would also seem, that most accidents happened on the first heat of the race.

The Helicopter crew would always start with a full tank of fuel, which caused them to have problems hovering, in the Summer heat. This caused me to have to jump at times from 20 to 30 feet into the water, with full SCUBA gear.

This was a little scary at times. In most cases because of this poor hovering and weight factors. I'd be left in the water on the course, until I was picked up by a boat and returned to the helicopter barge. I always wondered if the forgot about me in the middle of the lake, right on the course. Lake Washington is one BIG lake.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Washington

As you saw in the movie, the USCG divers don't use full SCUBA gear, as they are recovering people afloat or off boats. (They do wear a survival suit, mask and fins.) Their more modern helicopters also can land on the water in some cases, and do a lot better at hovering over a crash or rescue sites in other cases.

This was the type of helicopter used in the period.:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikorsky_H-34

The reason I as a civilian rescue/recovery diver was asked to do this was that the USCG had no divers or helicopter crewman that were trained to jump from the 'chopper and rescue people at that time. They let the basket or 'horse collar' down on the hoist and the victim had to save themselves.

In fact it was much later, when the program you saw in 'the Guardian' was developed.

I would like to think, that perhaps my pioneering, the use of a diver to rescue people from their helicopter, might have given them the idea to create such a program in the USCG. In any case I was the first to do this, from their helicopter and save lives. :wink:

BTW: I don't know if the old TV program 'Sea Hunt' featuring Lloyd Bridges, ever got to the UK. If it did and you can find the series, where they started to use an overhead (taken from an aircraft) of me jumping from the USCG Helicopter into the scene of a crashed hydro. (I Think it was when Muncy in the Thriftway hit and sank a 40 Foot USCG Cutter on the South turn of the course.) I've seen it and would love to have it myself. It looked good! They never said who it was though, as I recall they might have said a USCG diver, which didn't exist at the time.
 

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