Iron Rations

#1
Hi there. Many moons ago (make that years!) I was on a combat survival course where we were issued with a tin of chocolate rations with the instruction that it would be a chargeable offence to eat the contents...the tin was the same as a standard 2oz tobacco tin and I never saw the insides, but I havent seen one since. Any ideas where I might find one? Now working on civvy job where this would be useful. Thanks
 
#2
You must be getting on a bit; I've heard of those being issued to commandos in WWII. Apparently the chocolate is rock solid anyway. I doubt they're still made, and if you're looking to eat the chocolate then I suggest Yorkie bars.
 
#3
Bravo_Zulu said:
You must be getting on a bit; I've heard of those being issued to commandos in WWII. Apparently the chocolate is rock solid anyway. I doubt they're still made, and if you're looking to eat the chocolate then I suggest Yorkie bars.
A real jaw breaker, supposedly had enough energy to keep a guy going for a week. Tasted like eating cocoa straight from the tin, very rich, somewhat unpleasent.

I remember re-locating a tin in late '60s.
 
#4
I don't think its worth trying to find one of the WW2 chocolate rations:

a) they're quite rare nowadays and so re-enactors drive up the price;

b) the stuff inside bears no relation to Cadbury's finest - its more like dried up bootpolish, with a similar taste.

Can't imagine what sort of civvie job you're doing which might require survival food (its usually water that might be a problem in most "interesting" jobs these days), but when I've done anything like that - eg driving in the outback in Russia at -40oC - I've just carried the old make-your-own arctic kit of candles matches and mint cake in a tobacco tin.
 
#5
Slightly off topic: Does anyone remember a slab like bar of sludge, grease and muck made by, I think, Horlicks? It had directions that it could be eaten cold or mixed with instant potato powder to make it go further.
 
#6
Thanks for all the replies. The tin was issued to me in the early 80's and I was just wondering if it was still around. Of course, knowing the army at the time it is entirely conceivable that it was from WW2! I have made up other emergency rations from normal sources but was curious about what was issued now to fill this gap. Yes, water is definitely the main issue and have been using a camelbak for some time now, though there is still a 58 pattern bottle around for when I am going to be more than a day away from the accommodation...though I try to use civvy kit as much as possible these days
 
#7
happybonzo said:
Slightly off topic: Does anyone remember a slab like bar of sludge, grease and muck made by, I think, Horlicks? It had directions that it could be eaten cold or mixed with instant potato powder to make it go further.
Are you thinking of Bovril pemmican?, filthy stuff intended for feeding sled dogs.
You're better off eating the dog before you start eating his scoff.
 
#8
sandmanfez said:
happybonzo said:
Slightly off topic: Does anyone remember a slab like bar of sludge, grease and muck made by, I think, Horlicks? It had directions that it could be eaten cold or mixed with instant potato powder to make it go further.
Are you thinking of Bovril pemmican?, filthy stuff intended for feeding sled dogs.
You're better off eating the dog before you start eating his scoff.
I'm sure that it was called Horlicks Survival Food: I'll email Horlicks and see if they ever did produce something like that. They certainly don't appear to now.
Yes, I do remember the Bovril thing - unfortunately
 
#9
#10
If you had to make/carry your own emergency scoff - maximum calories per unit of weight/bulk being the key requirement you would think - what would you take?

I wonder if sugar will dissolve in oil and I wonder if it will fill in the spaces between the molecules (the way it will in water?). A litre of olive oil with a kilo of sugar dissolved in it? Mmmmmmmmm...................oily goodness.
 
#11
gobbyidiot said:
If you had to make/carry your own emergency scoff - maximum calories per unit of weight/bulk being the key requirement you would think - what would you take?

I wonder if sugar will dissolve in oil and I wonder if it will fill in the spaces between the molecules (the way it will in water?). A litre of olive oil with a kilo of sugar dissolved in it? Mmmmmmmmm...................oily goodness.
Just get yourself some of these.

High calorie food ration

If you are stuck on your boat for any reason, these high calorie biscuit formed food rations will keep you full of energy and put hunger at bay.

The pack is waterprooof and contains 9 biscuits. Total calories for the pack is a whopping 10,200, from 500g. Each biscuit contains a massive 1133 calories, yes you read that right!

No more than three biscuits need be consumed per person per day, so the pack will keep you going for many days. Plus it has at least a four year shelf life!

The biscuits stave off hunger because of their ingredients. Contains: wheat flour, vegetable fat, glucose and vitamins

Size: approx 120mm (W) x 90 (H) x 60 (D) mm


Approved by MCA (UK), NATO, USTC and US Coast Guard.


Price: £5.99

http://shop.lifejackets.co.uk/acatalog/Marine_first_aid_kits.html
 
#15
BigRed99 said:
Fat only contains 9 calories per gram.... 500 x 9 = 4500

Not sure their sums add up ??
I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm not a food scientist. But these sort of emergency rations are heavily fortified, is it not possible to achieve more than 9 calories a gram by frankensteining and super concentrating the ingredients?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#16
On a similar subject I found the wifes grandfathers christmas box of baccy in the wrapper and the metal tin cw the piccie of the princess from 1914. He waas an old sweat, Mons star, Bdr RFA in 1914 retiring as a Major in the RA in 45, nice rack of gongs. Some interesting bits and bobs in his travel trunk including christmas services lists in India during the 30's.
 
#17
When I was in training, my Cpl gave us all some RAF survival rations, these (if I remember correctly it was a few years ago) were the type that were ment to be eat one every few hours, and you won't require any other food.

Now I don't know where to get these from, but it might be worth looking at BCB, as they put together a lot of ration items for UK and other NATO forces, 99.9% of the packs from BCB come with NSN Numbers (real ones not fake China NSN!).

Have a look here......

http://bcbint.com/

Now the other company that also manufactures (as in puts in boxes!) rations, is based in Exeter (no not Arktis or PRI) but http://www.hawkmoor.com/home.php - the website dosn't mention rations, but they do make them up.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#18
We used to get some as freebies when the aircraft techies cleared out the old stock at St Mawgan. As per usual I believed them about inedibility but a mate swore by them on camping trips.
 
#19
Mr_Deputy said:
what are the bars which NATO/UNESCO etc give to starving civilians? they have been carefully designed and give all you need except water of course. I was taling with some nutricionalists who are designing a new one (a semi charitable project) and we discussed the existing one but can't remember what name it goes by.
I looked into trying to obtain something similar a while ago. A product I found was called 'Plumpy nut' which seemed to be some sort of peanut butter mix.
 
#20
gobbyidiot said:
If you had to make/carry your own emergency scoff - maximum calories per unit of weight/bulk being the key requirement you would think - what would you take?

I wonder if sugar will dissolve in oil and I wonder if it will fill in the spaces between the molecules (the way it will in water?). A litre of olive oil with a kilo of sugar dissolved in it? Mmmmmmmmm...................oily goodness.
That's pretty much something like Kendal Mint Cake, no?



Mr_Deputy said:
what are the bars which NATO/UNESCO etc give to starving civilians? they have been carefully designed and give all you need except water of course. I was talking with some nutritionists who are designing a new one (a semi charitable project) and we discussed the existing one but can't remember what name it goes by.
I recall having a conversation with a South African guy recently, who was telling me that aid charities in Southern Africa now produce a different high energy meal (I suppose) instead of the standard mealie type food that the aidees (sp?!) are used to, on the basis that particularly the children find that hard to digest - all those swollen stomachs you see on TV.
 

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