Iron Cross Magazine

Until Edition #4, when you won't be able to buy it at Wobbly Aitch Smiff, but will need to commit to a postal-only subscription at £180.00 a week/month/year, depending on the success of the initial marketing exercise :thumleft:
For You ze iron cross magazine is over....:skull:
 

exspy

LE
I read the whole thread and there's nothing to prove that the soldier in question ever wore the Nazi Iron Cross on his uniform with MOD approval. Merely that he claimed to have been awarded one late in the war and would wear one, covered up, on his uniform as a 'jape.'

However, I do know for a fact that a regiment's worth of fully fueled and armed Tiger II tanks was stored under the drill square of a British barracks in West Germany during the Cold War. True story, mate.

Cheers,
Dan.
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
I read the whole thread and there's nothing to prove that the soldier in question ever wore the Nazi Iron Cross on his uniform with MOD approval. Merely that he claimed to have been awarded one late in the war and would wear one, covered up, on his uniform as a 'jape.'

However, I do know for a fact that a regiment's worth of fully fueled and armed Tiger II tanks was stored under the drill square of a British barracks in West Germany during the Cold War. True story, mate.

Cheers,
Dan.
Why?
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Until Edition #4, when you won't be able to buy it at Wobbly Aitch Smiff, but will need to commit to a postal-only subscription at £180.00 a week/month/year, depending on the success of the initial marketing exercise :thumleft:
I'm glad I read someone else's in the crew-room at work then! Still a good mag and thanks for the info chap...
 
As you will know, the Iron Cross was around long before the Nazis.
I believe it dates back to the Napoleonic Wars (1813), when it was instituted as a gallantry award. It was always a battle award only, having to be re-instituted as every new war started. From 1870 to 1939 it had the reigning Emperor's monogram and crown as the center of the cross. The Nazis substituted a Swastika but they retained the custom of having the year the war started at the base of the cross. Despite appearance, it was still a military gallantry decoration only.

Many German soldiers and officers earned it during the Second World War for honorable service and did nothing to disgrace it thereafter. This included members of the SS. It was forbidden for German veterans of any Arm or Service to wear it post-war until 1957, when its swastika was removed and an Oak Leaf substituted.

Then there were people like Josef Mengele, who earned both lower grades I and II honorably on the Eastern Front. Mengele went on to become the chief medical officer at Auschwitz, and there are extant pictures of him wearing the EKI to give it its German designation while carrying out his murderous duties. He later escaped to South America and avoided justice until he died of a stroke while swimming.

It is things like this which make me hold the decoration in two minds, but I think the decision to allow it to be worn by veterans in the version with the Oak Leaf center was a fair one. One can only hope it wasn't worn by too many out and out criminals.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
We had plenty of official and unofficial photographers it was diaries that were forbidden
Greetings Ugly! Please google the rules for Front Line Camera use during WW1. Thankfully though some officers disregarded the rules and the MO of 2nd Bn The Cameronions in particular, has left a wonderful legacy.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Greetings Ugly! Please google the rules for Front Line Camera use during WW1. Thankfully though some officers disregarded the rules and the MO of 2nd Bn The Cameronions in particular, has left a wonderful legacy.
No need. We did have plenty of official photographers and a few unofficial ones too.
 

panzermeyer

Old-Salt
I came across this magazine in Belfast airport abut two months ago. This was largely due to my interest in all things WW1 which was piqued by the cover title 'Diary of a WW1 Fighter Pilot'. The majority of my degree at university, after leaving regular service, was in German history. Very little of it was actually to do with the Third Reich. I can confirm that this magazine is neither a pot boiler homage to the Third Reich, nor some top shelf vankfest material for reenactors. It is actually a gateway scholarly read for those interested in German military history between the periods stated and is written by both UK and German Historians. There have been two copies thus far and it does not shy away from controversy and difficult issues when pertinent to content. I am a regular reader of the monthly publication History of War (available in all good supermarket chains), thus far Iron Cross seems to hold a similar level of genuinely informative introductory standard and calibre of contributor.
 

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