Iron Cross Magazine


In case anyone is interested and hasn't seen this magazine.

I got the first issue of this new quarterly magazine - from the publisher of 'The Armourer' - back in June. I was impressed by the depth and breadth of the articles - none of your one or two page re-hashes of well-worn subjects. I was also struck by the calibre of the feature authors.

Edit: I missed the bloody obvious bit: the magazine is about German military history in WW1 and WW2!
EFSne2QXYAAMy4h.jpeg


Issue two is out now and the quality has been maintained.

This issue includes (I have nabbed this from the publisher's website and added details of the author of each piece):

Introduction by Lord Ashfield

Above The Trenches
The diary of a First World War German fighter pilot - Josef Kister - published for the first time and brought to life through a series of stunning photographs which have not previously seen the light of day. Also, colour profiles, and an article about interpreting camouflage from black and white images.

Valkyrie
At look at bomb plot to kill Adolf Hitler in 1944 and examination of one of the key players behind the assassination attempt, Claus von Stauffenberg. Author: Giles MacDonogh.

Ghosts of The Fleet
A leading marine archaeologist takes us on a journey of discovery to look at the scuttled High Seas Fleet at Scapa Flow, along with other maritime wrecks of the Great War and including remarkable underwater photos and scans of the wrecks. Author: Dr Innes McCartney.

Urban Combat
A fascinating examination of urban combat, one of the main elements of combat during the Second World War for the German Wehrmacht. Author: Dr Adrian Wettstein.

Jagdpanther
The Iron Cross team visit a recently restored Jagdpanther tank, and get up close and personal with the beast and tell the story of its history, discovery and restoration. Author - Mike Gibb, Director, The Weald Foundation.

Dissolution of the Luftwaffe
How the Luftwaffe, including its equipment and personnel, were dealt with by the Allies at the end of the Second World War in Europe. Author: Andy Saunders

Minenwerfer
In our regular series on armaments, we take a close inspection of the feared First World War weapon, the Minenwerfer. Author: Christoph Hopfer.

Flying the Albatros
A pilot and engineer of a reconstructed Albatros DVa fighter of the Imperial German Air Service tells what it is like to fly - and comes up with some surprising detail!

And an article about WW1 German identity discs; letters pages; book reviews; an article by Dr Roman Toppel on the 1941 Battle of Dubno; an article again by Dr Toppel on the apparent lottery regarding how the Knight's Cross was awarded; a short article about in a regular series about unit emblems, featuring KG55 'Greif'. A regular feature about unusual items of kit, etc. The Knight's Cross article is ten pages long, to give you an idea of the length of articles.

The magazine is 130 pages long and issue one lasted me the quarter. The magazine is £8.99.

Recommended.
 
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I got issue one of this new quarterly magazine back in June. I was impressed by the depth and breadth of the articles - none of your one or two page re-hashes of well-worn subjects. I was also struck by the calibre of the feature authors.

Issue two is out out and, happily, the quality has been maintained.

This issue will include:

Introduction by Lord Ashfield

Above The Trenches
The diary of a First World War German fighter pilot - Josef Kister - published for the first time and brought to life through a series of stunning photographs which have not previously seen the light of day. Also, colour profiles, and an article about interpreting camouflage from black and white images.

Valkyrie
At look at bomb plot to kill Adolf Hitler in 1944 and examination of one of the key players behind the assassination attempt, Claus von Stauffenberg. Author: Giles MacDonogh.

Ghosts of The Fleet
A leading marine archaeologist takes us on a journey of discovery to look at the scuttled High Seas Fleet at Scapa Flow, along with other maritime wrecks of the Great War and including remarkable underwater photos and scans of the wrecks. Author: Dr Innes McCartney.

Urban Combat
A fascinating examination of urban combat, one of the main elements of combat during the Second World War for the German Wehrmacht. Author: Dr Adrian Wettstein.

Jagdpanther
The Iron Cross team visit a recently restored Jagdpanther tank, and get up close and personal with the beast and tell the story of its history, discovery and restoration. Author - Mike Gibb, Director, The Weald Foundation.

Dissolution of the Luftwaffe
How the Luftwaffe, including its equipment and personnel, were dealt with by the Allies at the end of the Second World War in Europe. Author: Andy Saunders

Minenwerfer
In our regular series on armaments, we take a close inspection of the feared First World War weapon, the Minenwerfer. Author: Christoph Hopfer.

Flying the Albatros
A pilot and engineer of a reconstructed Albatros DVa fighter of the Imperial German Air Service tells what it is like to fly - and comes up with some surprising detail!

And an article about WW1 German identity discs; letters pages; book reviews; an article by Dr Roman Toppel on the 1941 Battle of Dubno; an article again by Dr Toppel on the apparent lottery regarding how the Knight's Cross was awarded,etc,etc.

The magazine is 130 pages and issue one lasted me the quarter.

Recommended.




  • The Armourer - October 2019
    On Sale
    03 September 2019

    Buy nowSubscr

Informative for those that dwell on all things NAZI and German, an ill thought out name for what might just evolve into a neo NAZI rag.......just a random thought.
 
Informative for those that dwell on all things NAZI and German, an ill thought name for what might turn out to evolve into a neo NAZI rag.......just a random thought.
Fair point. The first issue contained a feature about German atrocities in Poland so I don't think the magazine will shy away from those subjects, nor laud AH, etc.
 
Fair point. The first issue contained a feature about German atrocities in Poland so I don't think the magazine will shy away from those subjects, nor laud AH, etc.

Only time will tell, by the way, who publishes it, who or what interest group edit it, and where is it printed?
 
Only time will tell, by the way, who publishes it, who or what interest group edit it, and where is it printed?
It is published by Warners Group Publications of Lincoln. The same group publishes The Armourer Magazine, and Miniature Wargames.
The editors are Andy Saunders and Robin Schafer.
The magazine is printed by Warners. It did not say where.
The magazine has a decent glossy cover and high grain paper.

It is not a Wehraboo magazine. It is a serious history magazine imo.

I got mine in WHS.
 
It is published by Warners Group Publications of Lincoln. The same group publishes The Armourer Magazine, and Miniature Wargames.
The editors are Andy Saunders and Robin Schafer.
The magazine is printed by Warners. It did not say where.
The magazine has a decent glossy cover and high grain paper.

It is not a Wehraboo magazine. It is a serious history magazine imo.

I got mine in WHS.

Thank you for the prompt reply.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Fair point. The first issue contained a feature about German atrocities in Poland so I don't think the magazine will shy away from those subjects, nor laud AH, etc.
As you will know, the Iron Cross was around long before the Nazis. I am not a Nazi lover but you have to see some of their detailed battle reports and individual memoirs to actually realize how very detailed the German mind is. Despite all the allied bombing of Germany the German military archives are very intact. Most of their WW2 archives were kept in East Germany, the Russian didn't interfere with them. I have seen some of the these archives, many are on the web. The British idea of 'No Cameras' in battle I think was a mistake. The Germans recorded masses of their stuff using official photographers; why not take advantage of it?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
As you will know, the Iron Cross was around long before the Nazis. I am not a Nazi lover but you have to see some of their detailed battle reports and individual memoirs to actually realize how very detailed the German mind is. Despite all the allied bombing of Germany the German military archives are very intact. Most of their WW2 archives were kept in East Germany, the Russian didn't interfere with them. I have seen some of the these archives, many are on the web. The British idea of 'No Cameras' in battle I think was a mistake. The Germans recorded masses of their stuff using official photographers; why not take advantage of it?
We had plenty of official and unofficial photographers it was diaries that were forbidden
 
As you will know, the Iron Cross was around long before the Nazis. I am not a Nazi lover but you have to see some of their detailed battle reports and individual memoirs to actually realize how very detailed the German mind is. Despite all the allied bombing of Germany the German military archives are very intact. Most of their WW2 archives were kept in East Germany, the Russian didn't interfere with them. I have seen some of the these archives, many are on the web. The British idea of 'No Cameras' in battle I think was a mistake. The Germans recorded masses of their stuff using official photographers; why not take advantage of it?
While aware the Iron Cross was around before the nazis. I would be wary of any publication that even hinted of glorifying the murderous canutes.
 
As you will know, the Iron Cross was around long before the Nazis. I am not a Nazi lover but you have to see some of their detailed battle reports and individual memoirs to actually realize how very detailed the German mind is. Despite all the allied bombing of Germany the German military archives are very intact. Most of their WW2 archives were kept in East Germany, the Russian didn't interfere with them. I have seen some of the these archives, many are on the web. The British idea of 'No Cameras' in battle I think was a mistake. The Germans recorded masses of their stuff using official photographers; why not take advantage of it?
It is a potentially tricky subject (the association of that award with the Nazi era, and it being the title of a magazine).

Al Murray did a comment piece for the first edition which explains the magazine's aims better than I can [apologies for shoddy image]:

DSC_0026.jpg
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
In the 1970s there was a Gren Guards ex Wehrmacht Bandsman of German decent that wore his Iron, Cross with MOD approval.
 
The initial association I had when I saw the title of this thread was of an attempt at glorification. I think a less sensationalist title for serious documentary endeavour such as it proports (and appears) to be would be more appropriate.
I am aware that the Iron Cross predated Nazism but then so did the slogan "Arbeit Macht Frei", which was the title of an 1873 book on the subject of work being a means of reforming certain criminal types.
 
Last edited:

In case anyone is interested and hasn't seen this magazine.

I got the first issue of this new quarterly magazine - from the publisher of 'The Armourer' - back in June. I was impressed by the depth and breadth of the articles - none of your one or two page re-hashes of well-worn subjects. I was also struck by the calibre of the feature authors.

Edit: I missed the bloody obvious bit: the magazine is about German military history in WW1 and WW2! View attachment 419050

Issue two is out now and the quality has been maintained.

This issue includes (I have nabbed this from the publisher's website and added details of the author of each piece):

Introduction by Lord Ashfield

Above The Trenches
The diary of a First World War German fighter pilot - Josef Kister - published for the first time and brought to life through a series of stunning photographs which have not previously seen the light of day. Also, colour profiles, and an article about interpreting camouflage from black and white images.

Valkyrie
At look at bomb plot to kill Adolf Hitler in 1944 and examination of one of the key players behind the assassination attempt, Claus von Stauffenberg. Author: Giles MacDonogh.

Ghosts of The Fleet
A leading marine archaeologist takes us on a journey of discovery to look at the scuttled High Seas Fleet at Scapa Flow, along with other maritime wrecks of the Great War and including remarkable underwater photos and scans of the wrecks. Author: Dr Innes McCartney.

Urban Combat
A fascinating examination of urban combat, one of the main elements of combat during the Second World War for the German Wehrmacht. Author: Dr Adrian Wettstein.

Jagdpanther
The Iron Cross team visit a recently restored Jagdpanther tank, and get up close and personal with the beast and tell the story of its history, discovery and restoration. Author - Mike Gibb, Director, The Weald Foundation.

Dissolution of the Luftwaffe
How the Luftwaffe, including its equipment and personnel, were dealt with by the Allies at the end of the Second World War in Europe. Author: Andy Saunders

Minenwerfer
In our regular series on armaments, we take a close inspection of the feared First World War weapon, the Minenwerfer. Author: Christoph Hopfer.

Flying the Albatros
A pilot and engineer of a reconstructed Albatros DVa fighter of the Imperial German Air Service tells what it is like to fly - and comes up with some surprising detail!

And an article about WW1 German identity discs; letters pages; book reviews; an article by Dr Roman Toppel on the 1941 Battle of Dubno; an article again by Dr Toppel on the apparent lottery regarding how the Knight's Cross was awarded; a short article about in a regular series about unit emblems, featuring KG55 'Greif'. A regular feature about unusual items of kit, etc. The Knight's Cross article is ten pages long, to give you an idea of the length of articles.

The magazine is 130 pages long and issue one lasted me the quarter. The magazine is £8.99.

Recommended.
I have long been under the impression that the Iron Cross had an honourable pedigree which substantially pre-dates the two-part global conflict precipitated by imperialist/expansionist Germany in the first half of the twentieth century, in pursuit of whose defeat both my Grandfathers - and to a lesser extent my Great Grandad - served.

Have I misunderstood?​

Or is it just possible that in his post #2, @A signaller nailed this rag for what it is?​
 
I have long been under the impression that the Iron Cross had an honourable pedigree which substantially pre-dates the two-part global conflict precipitated by imperialist/expansionist Germany in the first half of the twentieth century, in pursuit of whose defeat both my Grandfathers - and to a lesser extent my Great Grandad - served.

Have I misunderstood?​

Or is it just possible that in his post #2, @A signaller nailed this rag for what it is?​
Have a look at the magazine in WHS and see what you think.

Al Murray has written for it and he is pretty much a definition of a Liberal/Left author. The other contributors have all written serious military histories; or studied the same.

it's not the HIAG monthly magazine, if that's what you are suggesting.

Look at a copy and see what you think.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer

In case anyone is interested and hasn't seen this magazine.

I got the first issue of this new quarterly magazine - from the publisher of 'The Armourer' - back in June. I was impressed by the depth and breadth of the articles - none of your one or two page re-hashes of well-worn subjects. I was also struck by the calibre of the feature authors.

Edit: I missed the bloody obvious bit: the magazine is about German military history in WW1 and WW2! View attachment 419050

Issue two is out now and the quality has been maintained.

This issue includes (I have nabbed this from the publisher's website and added details of the author of each piece):

Introduction by Lord Ashfield

Above The Trenches
The diary of a First World War German fighter pilot - Josef Kister - published for the first time and brought to life through a series of stunning photographs which have not previously seen the light of day. Also, colour profiles, and an article about interpreting camouflage from black and white images.

Valkyrie
At look at bomb plot to kill Adolf Hitler in 1944 and examination of one of the key players behind the assassination attempt, Claus von Stauffenberg. Author: Giles MacDonogh.

Ghosts of The Fleet
A leading marine archaeologist takes us on a journey of discovery to look at the scuttled High Seas Fleet at Scapa Flow, along with other maritime wrecks of the Great War and including remarkable underwater photos and scans of the wrecks. Author: Dr Innes McCartney.

Urban Combat
A fascinating examination of urban combat, one of the main elements of combat during the Second World War for the German Wehrmacht. Author: Dr Adrian Wettstein.

Jagdpanther
The Iron Cross team visit a recently restored Jagdpanther tank, and get up close and personal with the beast and tell the story of its history, discovery and restoration. Author - Mike Gibb, Director, The Weald Foundation.

Dissolution of the Luftwaffe
How the Luftwaffe, including its equipment and personnel, were dealt with by the Allies at the end of the Second World War in Europe. Author: Andy Saunders

Minenwerfer
In our regular series on armaments, we take a close inspection of the feared First World War weapon, the Minenwerfer. Author: Christoph Hopfer.

Flying the Albatros
A pilot and engineer of a reconstructed Albatros DVa fighter of the Imperial German Air Service tells what it is like to fly - and comes up with some surprising detail!

And an article about WW1 German identity discs; letters pages; book reviews; an article by Dr Roman Toppel on the 1941 Battle of Dubno; an article again by Dr Toppel on the apparent lottery regarding how the Knight's Cross was awarded; a short article about in a regular series about unit emblems, featuring KG55 'Greif'. A regular feature about unusual items of kit, etc. The Knight's Cross article is ten pages long, to give you an idea of the length of articles.

The magazine is 130 pages long and issue one lasted me the quarter. The magazine is £8.99.

Recommended.
I read the first issue as well and was very impressed as there was a wide range of very well written topics. I too would recommend this magazine.
 
I read the first issue as well and was very impressed as there was a wide range of very well written topics. I too would recommend this magazine.
Until Edition #4, when you won't be able to buy it at Wobbly Aitch Smiff, but will need to commit to a postal-only subscription at £180.00 a week/month/year, depending on the success of the initial marketing exercise :thumleft:
 

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