Irish War of Independence centenary

My Granny's brothers and other members of my family will feature in this thread next March too.
 
6 August 1920

Sean McEntee TD introduced a motion supporting a ban on financial and trade dealings with Unionist companies in Belfast. The motion was defeated. A Belfast Boycott Committee was set up in August by Catholics in Belfast including McEntee, Bishop MacRory, Frank Aiken and Fr John Hassan.

A letter written by Bishop MacRory said that until Belfast “is taught that it depends on Ireland, there will be recurrent outbursts of bigotry here, and a standing obstacle to the settlement of the whole of the Irish Question.”
 
6 August 1920

Sean McEntee TD introduced a motion supporting a ban on financial and trade dealings with Unionist companies in Belfast. The motion was defeated. A Belfast Boycott Committee was set up in August by Catholics in Belfast including McEntee, Bishop MacRory, Frank Aiken and Fr John Hassan.

A letter written by Bishop MacRory said that until Belfast “is taught that it depends on Ireland, there will be recurrent outbursts of bigotry here, and a standing obstacle to the settlement of the whole of the Irish Question.”
Ha, ha, ha. That worked well.
 
7 August 1920

An ambush on an RIC patrol near Kildorrery, Co. Cork resulted in the wounding of all six men in the patrol, one of whom later died. Constable Ernest Watkins, a married man from Monmouth died, aged 29, in Fermoy Military Hospital. Watkins had two months service in the RIC.

An attempted attack on the RIC barracks in Innishannon, Co. Cork had to be called off when a weapon went off prematurely and alerted the garrison.
 
8 August 1920

William Hartnett from Emly, Co. Tipperary was shot and killed by the RIC while cycling home at Keatings Cross, Emly. William was 57 years old and the killing appears to have been random.

Archbishop Daniel Mannix of Melbourne was travelling from New York to Ireland aboard the SS Baltic. A century ago today, off the south coast, the ship was intercepted by HMS Wyvern and Mannix was taken from the Baltic by Scotland Yard detectives and landed at Penzance. The Archbishop, who was born in Charleville, Co. Cork, was an outspoken Irish Republican and the British government had taken the decision to prevent his landing in Ireland or travelling to any city in the UK with a large Irish population. Mannix remained in London for a year, living in a convent in Hammersmith. The newspapers dubbed him the Pirate of Penzance and made much of the fact that he was prevented from visiting his elderly mother before she died.
 
9 August 1920

The Restoration of Order in Ireland Act 1920 received Royal Assent.

Members of the British administration, including John Anderson the Under Secretary for Ireland, were forced to move into Dublin Castle for their own protection.
 
10 August 1920

Thomas Farrelly aged 20, of 30 Mary’s Lane, Dublin was shot and fatally wounded by a patrol of the Lancashire Fusiliers. Thomas Clarke, 19, of 16 Green Street, was seriously wounded. They were part of a group out after curfew.
 
11 August 1920

Michael Fitzgerald Officer Commanding, 4th Bn, Cork 2nd Brigade and 10 other men started a hunger strike in Cork Prison. Fitzgerald died on 17 October.

It was reported in the Irish News that a handful of long-serving Catholic workers were expelled from Dixon’s Saw Mills in Milewater Road, Belfast after they refused to sign a ‘loyalty’ document.

The Dáil agreed to a limited Belfast Boycott confined to banks and insurance companies.
 
12 August 1920

I.R.A. Volunteer Edward Nolan died accidently, aged 21, when he drowned while swimming in the Slaney River while on an I.R.A. weekend training camp. Nolan was a native of Askamore, Ferns, County Wexford. He had served time in prison for wearing a Volunteer Uniform at the funeral of Seamus Rafter.
Terence MacSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork and Commandant Cork No. 1 Brigade was arrested for possession of “seditious articles &documents". On the 16th he was sentenced to two years' imprisonment and transferred to Brixton Prison, London. He immediately joined the hunger strike that had started in Cork prison and will die on 25 October.

MacSwiney was arrested in a raid on Cork City Hall. Arrested with him were Liam Lynch, OC Cork No. 2 Brigade, Sean O’Hegarty, 2i/c Cork No. 1 Brigade, Joseph O’Connor, QM Cork No. 1 Brigade, Daniel O’Donovan, OC 1st Bn, Cork No.1 Brigade and Michael Leahy, OC 4th Battalion, Cork No. 1 Brigade, all of whom were released because of a failure to identify them, an almost unbelievable intelligence failure by the British.

A British army bicycle patrol cycled through the village of Rosegreen, Co. Tipperary early on a pleasant August evening. As they approached the crossroads in the centre of the village, a meeting of the officers of the 3rd Tipperary Brigade broke up and exited a barn 20 yards away. Three soldiers were wounded in the subsequent exchange of shots.
 
13 August 1920

Two RIC men were injured in an IRA attack near Abbeydorney, Co. Kerry.
 
14 August 1920

185267 Pte Albert Nunn, Machine Gun Corps was killed during an IRA attack. A plane made a forced landing near Clonbanin, Co. Cork, about four miles south of Kanturk. Shortly afterwards about twenty British soldiers were deployed from the Kanturk garrison to guard the aircraft.

Just before dawn on the 14th a party of about twenty IRA under Jack O'Connell, the Battalion O.C. moved into the area, with the intention of attacking the guard. When they got to the fence adjoining the field, they were fired on by a sentry, Pte Nunn, who was shot dead. The IRA retreated without sustaining any casualties. Nunn was aged 18 and from Chesterfield.

John Coughlan, a civilian aged 46 from Queenstown, committed suicide in IRA custody near Aghada, Co. Cork. Coughlan was according to the IRA arrested for allowing his daughters to engage in prostitution with the Army and, presumably because they lived in Queenstown, the Royal Navy. Retrospectively they decided he must have been a spy (why else would he have hanged himself?). Instead of burying the body the IRA men threw Coughlan into the sea where he inevitably washed ashore a few weeks later.

Patrick Lynch, an IRA Volunteer was shot and killed at Hospital, County Limerick

The IRA burned military stores at the railway yard in Tralee. In reprisal the police burned the printing works of the Kerry News, Kerry Weekly Reporter and Killarney Echo in Russell Street, Tralee.
 
15 August 1920

Constable Cyril Nathan was shot and killed in Limerick. According to a newspaper account at the time, the Black and Tans were rampaging through the city firing shots at random after a report of an attack on two detectives. Nathan and another Constable stationed at Boherbuoy Barracks were off duty and had just returned from church. They heard firing outside and put their heads out to investigate when Nathan was hit in the head. The rampaging policemen also managed to wound a British soldier who was helping a child into cover and an ex-soldier who had lost an eye in France was shot in the arm on Carey’s Road.

Constable Nathan was aged 19 and from London.

Lieutenant Joseph McMahon was killed in Cavan when a bomb he was testing exploded in his hands. Another Volunteer, Patrick Roach, was wounded in the same incident. They were testing a time-fuse bomb when it exploded prematurely due to the fuse being wet.
 
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14 August 1920

185267 Pte Albert Nunn, Machine Gun Corps was killed during an IRA attack. A plane made a forced landing near Clonbanin, Co. Cork, about four miles south of Kanturk. Shortly afterwards about twenty British soldiers were deployed from the Kanturk garrison to guard the aircraft.

Just before dawn on the 14th a party of about twenty IRA under Jack O'Connell, the Battalion O.C. moved into the area, with the intention of attacking the guard. When they got to the fence adjoining the field, they were fired on by a sentry, Pte Nunn, who was shot dead. The IRA retreated without sustaining any casualties. Nunn was aged 18 and from Chesterfield.

John Coughlan, a civilian aged 46 from Queenstown, committed suicide in IRA custody near Aghada, Co. Cork. Coughlan was according to the IRA arrested for allowing his daughters to engage in prostitution with the Army and, presumably because they lived in Queenstown, the Royal Navy. Retrospectively they decided he must have been a spy (why else would he have hanged himself?). Instead of burying the body the IRA men threw Coughlan into the sea where he inevitably washed ashore a few weeks later.

Patrick Lynch, an IRA Volunteer was shot and killed at Hospital, County Limerick

The IRA burned military stores at the railway yard in Tralee. In reprisal the police burned the printing works of the Kerry News, Kerry Weekly Reporter and Killarney Echo in Russell Street, Tralee.
The Couglan abduction/suicide/murder is discussed more in depth here:


A strange case indeed.
 
Constable Cyril Nathan was shot and killed in Limerick. According to a newspaper account at the time, the Black and Tans were rampaging through the city firing shots at random after a report of an attack on two detectives. Nathan and another Constable stationed at Boherbuoy Barracks were off duty and had just returned from church. They heard firing outside and put their heads out to investigate when Nathan was hit in the head. The rampaging policemen also managed to wound a British soldier who was helping a child into cover and an ex-soldier who had lost an eye in France was shot in the arm on Carey’s Road.

Constable Nathan was aged 19 and from London.
Would this be a case of a 'Black on Tan'?
 
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