Irish War of Independence centenary

As with any conflict you will inevitably get a number of strange events occurring, and alongside that of course will be characters, both good and bad. This chap is probably correctly described in the following article as an enigma:


A British Army chaplain in both wars with republican leanings. He apparently attended Tom Barry's wedding as well and was evacuated from Dunkirk.

In addition to the Military Cross, Father Duggan was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE), the 1939-1945 Star and the 1939-1945 Defence and War Medals. In 2015 his medals were put up for auction in Woodward’s Auctioneers and they were purchased by Cork Public Museum.

A strange tale indeed and a fascinating life to boot.
 
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4 April 1920

Overnight, in a series of coordinated attacks, the IRA burned 218 abandoned RIC Barracks and posts, and raided and burned 21 tax offices across Ireland.
 
5 April 1920

Start of a Hunger strike in Mountjoy Jail by IRA prisoners demanding political status.

The Dublin administration believed that another mass Rising was planned for today (it's Easter Monday) and there was intense military activity in Dublin. The rumours proved unfounded.

Edited to add;

Police in Washington began arresting women picketing the British Embassy. Over the coming days, at least ten picketers were arrested. @globalirishrev

The military raided the Republican Temperance Bar in Findlater's Place, Dublin. A crowd surrounded the troops who fired 16 shots over their heads wounding one man in the wrist. Obviously he had his hands up and was surrendering when he was shot. The Tommies swore they saw a gunman on the roof of a building and they were firing at him. @131Weeks
 
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6 April 1920

Following the arrests of two women the day before in Washington, Honor Walsh and Elaine Barrie, both of Pennsylvania, were arrested shortly after beginning their picket today. When their replacements, Kathleen O'Brien, Philadelphia, and Helen O'Brien, St. Louis were also arrested it was announced by other women present that the protest would end for the day.
 
7 April 1920

The body of 26985 Sapper James McKay, RE was found on a beach on Bere Island, Co. Cork. McKay who had served in France from February 1915, had apparently drowned. He is interred in Ballynakilla Churchyard on the island.

Sean O'Carroll, the proprietor of the Republican Temperence Bar in Findlater's Place, Dublin was released from custody. O’Carroll and five other men had been arrested on 5th April during a raid on the premises by the Army. During the raid a crowd surrounded the troops and they opened fire over the heads of the assembled citizenry. One particularly tall individual was shot in the wrist. The Tommies subsequently claimed to have seen a gunman on a roof of a building in O'Connell Street and they fired at him.

An attack on Roskeen RIC Barracks in Tipperary had to be abandoned when reinforcements arrived from Thurles.

70 IRA prisoners in Mountjoy Jail are on their third day of hunger strike.

In Washington, Honor Walsh, Helen O'Brien, Elaine Barrie, and Kathleen O'Brien, were released on bail.
 
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overopensights

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As a former 'Badge Wearer' I would just like to remark that the bemedaled officer being inspected by Gen Wood, has a 'Fine position of attention'
a good position of attention.jpg
 
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8 April 1920

280 members of the Machine Gun Corps arrived in Dublin from Holyhead. They were to be sent to Buttevant, Co. Cork for deployment.

The hunger strike continued in Mountjoy. Among those in the hospital prison is Alexander McCabe, T.D. for Sligo. Thomas Ashe, who died on hunger strike in 1917, was frequently mentioned in the press at this time so the newspapers were obviously assuming some of the Mountjoy men would be allowed die.

Armed and masked men entered the home of an ex-British soldier and Boer War veteran demanding that he leave the area by dawn or he will be killed. He wisely quit his home.

The IRA continued to burn abandoned RIC Barracks in rural areas. The building in Clonea, Co. Waterford was torched on this day a century ago.
 
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9 April 1920

Sergeant John Brady was seriously wounded when the RIC Barracks at Rush Co. Dublin was attacked. Brady, who would die a month later, was 50 years old and a native of Bray County Wicklow.

Two RIC men were shot dead in the Lackamore Wood Ambush when cycling from Rearcross to Newport Petty Sessions in Co, Tipperary. The two policemen were Constable William Finn, aged 22, a native of Castlereagh Co. Roscommon and Constable Daniel McCarthy, aged 27, from Waterville Co. Kerry. Amongst the ambushers were Jim Stapleton (involved in at least two killings of RIC men already), Jerry Ryan and Mick Small (whose father’s shop was bombed by the RIC a week ago). It’s odd that the three were senior figures in the Mid Tipperary Brigade area while this ambush was a North Tipp job.
 
As a former 'Badge Wearer' I would just like to remark that the bemedaled officer being inspected by Gen Wood, has a 'Fine position of attention' View attachment 463400
Unusual photo as they appear to be dressed in RIC Blue/bottle green uniforms, suggesting sometime in 1921, but still wearing puttees, when every other photograph that I have seen shows the ADRIC abandoned puttees and leather leggings when issued the full RIC uniform.
 
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10 April 1920

Outside Mountjoy Prison a large crowd of protestors gathered as the hunger strike continued. Attempts by the police to move people on proved fruitless. The attempt at dispersing the crowd was probably half-hearted as the protestors were reciting the Rosary and the good Catholic Peelers would not be messing with the Virgin Mary.

Over in London Mr Denis Morgan was detained in Wormwood Scrubs. You may recall Denis as Father Ted’s granddad whose house was shot up by the RIC back in January. Mr Morgan was having a bad year and on this day one of his children died. When he was refused parole to attend his son’s funeral, the 98 republican prisoners in the Scrubs began a hunger strike.

Over in Washington the latest prisoners arrested outside the British Embassy, Maura Quinn and Mary Galvin, were released on bail.
 
11 April 1920

Protests continued outside Mountjoy Prison in Dublin. A large military presence outside the prison prevented the crowds approaching the prison gate. Troops were also deployed at the nearby Mater Hospital where warning shots were fired at about 5 pm. During the afternoon a tank and an armoured car were deployed in support.

In Limerick, a group of men attempted to disarm Lt Barkworth of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on O'Connell Street. During the ensuing scuffle a local businessman named Place intervened to assist the Lieutenant and was shot in the arm.
 
12 April 1920

The National Executive of the Irish Trade Union Congress and the Irish Labour Party announced a two day general strike of all occupations in Ireland from tomorrow in support of the hunger strikers in Mountjoy.
 
Was it the old Irish favourites they were singing like: 'Come Out Ye Black and Tans' which I must admit has a very catchy tune. If they were playing 'The Star of the County Down' all is forgiven.
"Come Out Ye Black and Tans" is a bit of a beery rabble-rouser and I have to say it would be one of my least favourite "rebel songs". Mainly because it celebrates a drunken, jeering bowsie trying to start fights with his neighbours years after the conflict. To me it's a triumphalist sectarian song aimed at the small and vulnerable protestant community still living in Dublin, good for belting out over the pints on a Friday night but lacking the dignity of the older 19th century nationalist ballads.

The classic older ballads had a poetic quality to them and spoke to the Victorian British education that their writers received and which would have resonated with listeners. The Catholic church in Ireland took on board the ethos of the British public schools with a vengeance and used it as a template for its own schools and continued to do so for decades after it had been largely abandoned in England (I think Scotland also retained standards of excellence in education) to the extent that the son of an unemployed labourer in a Catholic school would still be taught Latin, History, English literature, French and of course Irish where his protestant counterpart might be taught metal work or carpentry (perhaps a lot more useful in the long run) in his school.

This comes through in the songs with references to Greece and Rome and ancient freemen, and lines like "mid rocks their guardian chivalry" and "long and proud a haughty race, honoured and sentinelled the place" in the stirring "A Nation Once Again" and haunting "The West's Awake". Great stuff altogether! Just the ticket for a long night.

But I suspect that what @overopensights might have heard being sung were just the old-fashioned "Irish" ballads and laments that would be the staple of any singalong. I put "Irish" in inverted commas because of course half of the great old Irish songs that make up the repertoire of any decent come-all'ye aren't Irish at all but more often than not Scottish and English songs but happily looted by the Irish as "traditional" and therefore somehow theirs.
 
My Mum was in a care home near Toome.
Any time I’d take her for a bacon sarnie and pot of tea in the O’Neill Arms, we‘d pass the Roddy memorial statue.
I wish the United Irishmen make-up was better known.
An ancestor did time in Mountjoy for a related matter.
 
My Mum was in a care home near Toome.
Any time I’d take her for a bacon sarnie and pot of tea in the O’Neill Arms, we‘d pass the Roddy memorial statue.
I wish the United Irishmen make-up was better known.
An ancestor did time in Mountjoy for a related matter.
Isn't it funny, the ferocious Ulster Presbyterian rebelliousness and contumacious republicanism was a huge driving force behind the American declaration of independence from Britain thus changing the course of world history, and yet today in Ireland, where it was nurtured, both sides of the house prefer to pass it over in embarrassed silence.
 
.....the stirring "A Nation Once Again" and haunting "The West's Awake". Great stuff altogether! Just the ticket for a long night....
A Nation Once Again is a contender for an alternative National Anthem. It would probably make a better one if they made a decent Irish version of it.

...I put "Irish" in inverted commas because of course half of the great old Irish songs that make up the repertoire of any decent come-all'ye aren't Irish at all but more often than not Scottish and English songs but happily looted by the Irish as "traditional" and therefore somehow theirs.
Faith of Our Fathers used be sung at GAA matches once upon a time although it's really a hymn about the restoration of Catholicism to England. All the songs you mention were taught in Irish schools when I was a child. My grandkids, I was amused to discover, learned The Galtee Mountain Boy. A more recent Come All Ye, popularised by Christy Moore.
 

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