Irish War of Independence centenary

If you were flying in a chopper at the end of Shackelton Barracks, Ballykelly, there was a single engined American fighter that had crashed into the drink in WW2. Luckily the pilot got out apparently. You could see it on a sunny day in low tide.
Still visible. There is a bird watching spot on the levee(?) it can be seen from there.
 
27 March 1920


Volunteer James McCarthy from Thurles, Co. Tipperary was shot dead when he answered a knock at his door. Members of the RIC were suspected of having carried out the killing. McCarthy was aged 27 and a Baker by trade.
 
I think we need to implement a Spoiler Alert regime if you lads are going to be skipping ahead to the Civil War all the time.
Well we already have had numerous references to the Black and Tans and they haven't even crossed the Irish sea yet.

The boys of the ADRIC are still selling matches on the street corners of London and Manchester.
 
Well we already have had numerous references to the Black and Tans and they haven't even crossed the Irish sea yet.

The boys of the ADRIC are still selling matches on the street corners of London and Manchester.
The first B&Ts officially arrived in Ireland on 25th March. Some people claim they'd been here for several weeks by then. But live in the moment, there's lots of murder and mayhem in 1920. No need to be skipping ahead to Free State Army mine clearing operations in Kerry in 1923.
 
The first B&Ts officially arrived in Ireland on 25th March. Some people claim they'd been here for several weeks by then. But live in the moment, there's lots of murder and mayhem in 1920. No need to be skipping ahead to Free State Army mine clearing operations in Kerry in 1923.
If you excuse the terminology, bang on!
 
The first B&Ts officially arrived in Ireland on 25th March. Some people claim they'd been here for several weeks by then. But live in the moment, there's lots of murder and mayhem in 1920. No need to be skipping ahead to Free State Army mine clearing operations in Kerry in 1923.
A slightly different date

On 27 December, Dublin Castle authorised the extension of RIC recruitment to Britain. Offices were immediately opened in London, Liverpool, and Glasgow and the first British constables were enrolled on 2 January 1920.

Initially, the uptake was modest, comprising a monthly average of 100 enlistments between January and June. However, the doubling of an RIC constable’s starting salary in July led to a upsurge in interest, resulting in over 8,000 British and 2,000 Irish enlistments in the subsequent twelve months.

Small detachments of so-called ‘English recruits’ began arriving in Ireland from 7 January. After cursory training in the Phoenix Park depot, they were distributed around the country where they were barracked with and served alongside the ‘old RIC’ . Although there was no formal distinction between them, the appearance of what the Meath Chronicle termed this ‘Royal English Constabulary’ soon caused a stir, not least because of its peculiar attire.

 
28 March 1920

The body of Denis Crowley was discovered in a field near Newcastlewest, Co. Limerick. He had been blindfolded and shot dead. Crowley was from Cappoquin, Co. Waterford and had enlisted in the ASC in 1915. In 1918 he deserted the South Wales Borderers, was captured and deserted again in 1919. In the winter of 1919 he turned up, first in Kerry and then in Moneygall, Co. Offaly, posing as an IRA Volunteer named Buckley. He made the rookie mistake of claiming to be from Kerry despite his strong Waterford accent. Presumably with the locals getting suspicious of him, Crowley made his way back towards Kerry but was intercepted by the IRA in Limerick who shot him as a spy.
 

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Apparently a lot of British soldiers on Op Banner said the same.
Lying outside a pub in a back alley in Belfast watching for a certain person, when from that Pub I heard the finest 'live singing' that I have ever heard. I just wanted to go in there and sit and listen! it was wonderful stuff,
 
Lying outside a pub in a back alley in Belfast watching for a certain person, when from that Pub I heard the finest 'live singing' that I have ever heard. I just wanted to go in there and sit and listen! it was wonderful stuff,
Thats a big compliment to them coming from a Welshman. Or were you just bored?
 
If you were flying in a chopper at the end of Shackelton Barracks, Ballykelly, there was a single engined American fighter that had crashed into the drink in WW2. Luckily the pilot got out apparently. You could see it on a sunny day in low tide.
Tis a RN Vought F4U Corsair FAA flown by a Canadian who survived 9 Oct 44
 
29 March 1920


Thomas O’ Dwyer from The Ragg, Co. Tipperary was shot dead in his home. His killers followed up by bombing the nearby home of the Small family. Both O’ Dwyer and one of the Smalls were IRA members. Mick Small will be turning up early next month at an ambush in North Tipperary.

The Ragg, or Bouladuff as the village is also known, was the location of the killing of Constable Heaney at the start of the month.

The Better Government of Ireland Bill got its second reading in the Commons. It was passed by 348 votes to 94.
 

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Thats a big compliment to them coming from a Welshman. Or were you just bored?
There was also a little village hall near or in Keady where you got some really good singing, mostly youngsters. it floated out into the night, wonderful stuff. they also had an accomplished girl accordionist. They didn't seem to mind us listening in on summer evenings. As a Welshman, yes! it was very much appreciated.
 

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You did a brilliant job of that last time with General Percival and Singapore. We ended up with the British Pacific Fleet and how many carriers and what type were in the Fleet.

And I get flak for straying into the Civil War.
Par avion Greetings! I know that you have a sense of history and would have enjoyed the slide into the Pacific! We had a wonderful History teacher at school he often said "If you have no sense of History then you have no soul" Lessons on Agincourt for example saw him coming into the classroom firing arrows about the walls with his freshly made bow! and firing off verbal shouts of battle and Henry 5th! Nothing wrong with a bit of diversity!
 
30 March 1920

The IRA ambushed a three-man RIC patrol at Killiney Cross near Castlegregory. Co. Kerry. The ambush party consisted of five men led by Tadgh Brosnan. One RIC man was wounded in the leg and three Webley revolvers captured.

Joe Sweeney and PJ Ward, two of Donegal’s Sinn Féin TDs were arrested and served with internment orders. The third Donegal TD was Joe O’Doherty who had been arrested in early February. They were initially held in Derry Jail, then moved to Crumlin Road jail in Belfast and then to Wormwood Scrubs prison in London. Within days they and all other republican prisoners would go on hunger strike.

In Cork Terence McSwiney was elected Lord Mayor to replace Tomás MacCurtain.


30 new RIC men arrived in Tipperary. Unusually, they were wearing khaki uniforms and spoke with English accents.

Edited to add photo of McSwiney and link to an article on him.
 
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30 March 1920

The IRA ambushed a three-man RIC patrol at Killiney Cross near Castlegregory. Co. Kerry. The ambush party consisted of five men led by Tadgh Brosnan. One RIC man was wounded in the leg and three Webley revolvers captured.

Joe Sweeney and PJ Ward, two of Donegal’s Sinn Féin TDs were arrested and served with internment orders. The third Donegal TD was Joe O’Doherty who had been arrested in early February. They were initially held in Derry Jail, then moved to Crumlin Road jail in Belfast and then to Wormwood Scrubs prison in London. Within days they and all other republican prisoners would go on hunger strike.

In Cork Terence McSwiney was elected Lord Mayor to replace Tomás MacCurtain.

30 new RIC men arrived in Tipperary. Unusually, they were wearing khaki uniforms and spoke with English accents.
Two significant straws in the wind there.
 
31 March 1920

The RIC Hut at Clonoulty, Co. Tipperary was attacked by men from the 2nd Battalion, South Tipperary Brigade. The successful defence was led by Sgt Patrick McDonnell whom we'll be meeting again in May.

The attack was led by James Leahy and Ned Reilly. According to @131 Weeks, the attack was a Come-On to lure military reinforcements into an ambush. The reinforcements failed to materialise. The Tipperary lads are getting ambitious.

5th Battalion, Cork No. 3 Brigade, led by Ted O’Sullivan attacked Durrus RIC barracks. Despite a long fight, there were no serious injuries on either side.

The attackers managed to break through roof of the barracks and drop improvised bombs into the interior which caused considerable damage and seriously wounded two of the defenders. Sergeant O'Sullivan was wounded in the head and Constable Donovan lost one of his hands. The bombs were made from metal pipes stuffed with scrap metal and gelignite. An attempt was also made to set fire to the building by pouring petrol through the hole.

The IRA also attacked the RIC barracks at Scartaglin, near Castleisland Co. Kerry. The barracks was successfully defended but was abandoned by the RIC within a few days. The attack was led by Tom McEllistrim who has been busy this last week. The IRA detonated a bomb which badly damaged the gable end of building, but their attempts to set fire to building were scuppered when a water tank damaged by the attack extinguished the fire.

33 republican prisoners were moved from Cork jail to Belfast. Among them was P.J Moloney, a Tipperary T.D. who was arrested a few days earlier.

Edited to add details of the attacks and the transfer of prisoners from Cork. Information from @131 Weeks.
 
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1 April 1920


American women began a picket of the British Embassy in Washington, claiming impending massacre in Ireland. It was an election year in the US and the move was designed to maximise publicity during the Presidential Primaries. The driving force behind the campaign was Dr William Maloney, a Scottish WW1 veteran who had earned an MC at Gallipoli. Many of the women were actually paid to do the picketing as Maloney wanted good-looking young women being harrassed by the authorities, not toothless mothers of ten.


Global Lives: Dr William J. Maloney | Century Ireland

Women's Pickets, 1920 — Revolutionary Irish-America
 

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