Irish War of Independence centenary

Regarding the second paragraph. Theres a funny story about an American,Bud Wolfe who was flying in one of the RAF Eagle Sqns early in the war. His Spitfire crashed in Donegal,(It was salvaged a number of years ago, Dan Snow did a programme about it, and got one of its machine guns firing again) Any hoo. Bud was sent of to the Curragh for internment, and fell into the routine, where they were given weekend passes and an allowance to go out to local towns on their own parole. Bud having come over to fight the Hun, uses this parole to return to NI. On reporting to the senior officer in Belfast, feeling pretty good about making His 'escape' The Senior officer asks if He'd given His word as an officer that He wouldn't attempt to escape while on parole. Bud says Yes, but theres a war on ,and He'd come to fight it. The Senior Officer calls Him a bally disgrace, and sends Him back. Where he promptly gets filled in by some of His fellow internees ,as the parole system was suspended after His legging it. The poor lad came to Britain to fight fascism, and instead found Himself in something akin to an Ealing Comedy. IIRC He was released a few months later. Went on to fly for the USAAF, And then the USAF in Korea and early in the Vietnam war.
Spot on. It was through the Bud W story that I learnt about it.
 
There is an informative article here: Swanzy's murder lead to anti catholic rioting in Lisburn and Banbridge with 22 deaths and most of the catholic pop[ulation burned out and forced to flee to Belfast, Ironically this also lead to the formal establishment of the B Specials.

Another police officer murdered 69 years later, on his way to Church this time.

Alywn Harris.

Happily, although thousands turned out for his funeral, no reprisals were taken against the local Catholic population.

His son, Drew Harris, himself a former RUC officer is now Garda Commisioner.
 

NI-EX-MEDIC

War Hero
Huguenots originated in France and due to persecution settled in what we now call Luxembourg, Belgium and Holland as well as many other countries.. They had in the main been out of France for 100 years before reaching Ireland.

Hugeunot regiments, three infantry and one cavalry delivered significantly to the success of William of Orange at the Boyne and elsewhere. He brought these regiments with him from Holland, to England and then on to Ireland. Perhaps the song should really be "De sah die mijn vader droeg"

Ulster Protestants descend from a variety of lineages, including Lowland Scots (some of whose descendants consider themselves Ulster Scots), English, Irish and Huguenots

An easy rule of thumb being Presbyterian - Scots descent, Church of Ireland - English descent
It appears yo have a very good knowledge of the subject, could you go back a bit into who the real irish men were and give another history lesson to all the naysayers here. As far as i am aware the *native irishman" is shite and they only appeared later in history than they would have you believe
 
Huguenots originated in France and due to persecution settled in what we now call Luxembourg, Belgium and Holland as well as many other countries.. They had in the main been out of France for 100 years before reaching Ireland.

Hugeunot regiments, three infantry and one cavalry delivered significantly to the success of William of Orange at the Boyne and elsewhere. He brought these regiments with him from Holland, to England and then on to Ireland. Perhaps the song should really be "De sah die mijn vader droeg"

Ulster Protestants descend from a variety of lineages, including Lowland Scots (some of whose descendants consider themselves Ulster Scots), English, Irish and Huguenots

An easy rule of thumb being Presbyterian - Scots descent, Church of Ireland - English descent
The Hugeunot people are fascinating and you can see their influence in Northern Ireland in names like Frizzell and Molyneaux and LeFevre, but I often wonder about their background.

We know them to be great artisans, tradesmen and skilled craftsmen but which came first? Where they ordinary Frenchmen, with their pastis-sipping, shrugging shouldered, laissez faire attitude to the world, who upon discovering protestantism suddenly became God-fearing, hard-working, early-rising, no-nonsense Stakhanovites, in contrast to their shiftless, lazy popish fellow countrymen? Or were they already hard-working, solid burghers who by virtue of their outlook were ripe for a religious and political system that rejected the established order of aristocracy and the Catholic church?

I suspect it was the latter. You see something similar in Latin America today where the fastest growing religion is evangelical protestantism and this is among the middle class, aspirational types (something similar is evident among Chinese communities in Asia).

It's not hard to see why the French state felt so threatened by them.
 
The Hugeunot people are fascinating and you can see their influence in Northern Ireland in names like Frizzell and Molyneaux and LeFevre, but I often wonder about their background.

We know them to be great artisans, tradesmen and skilled craftsmen but which came first? Where they ordinary Frenchmen, with their pastis-sipping, shrugging shouldered, laissez faire attitude to the world, who upon discovering protestantism suddenly became God-fearing, hard-working, early-rising, no-nonsense Stakhanovites, in contrast to their shiftless, lazy popish fellow countrymen? Or were they already hard-working, solid burghers who by virtue of their outlook were ripe for a religious and political system that rejected the established order of aristocracy and the Catholic church?

I suspect it was the latter. You see something similar in Latin America today where the fastest growing religion is evangelical protestantism and this is among the middle class, aspirational types (something similar is evident among Chinese communities in Asia).

It's not hard to see why the French state felt so threatened by them.
Don't forget that they also gave us Nigel Farage.
 
21 March 1920

Constable William McCarthy was shot and wounded in Kilbrittain, Co. Cork. He is seriously injured and transferred to a hospital in Cork.
 
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22 March 1920

About 9.30pm 120 soldiers of the Royal Berkshire Regiment were returning from a performance at the theatre. The lads were singing Rule Britannia and God Save the King, which p1ssed off the locals somewhat and they were attacked by a hostile crowd on South Richmond Street Dublin. In the ensuing affray, a man and a woman were killed by revolver shots and another man was injured by a bullet wound in the wrist. One soldier was shot through the chest and four soldiers injured by missiles. The two dead civilians were taken to the Meath Hospital where they were identified as Eileen (or perhaps Ellen) Hendrick, aged 19 of Francis Street. (Eileen was initially identified as a Margaret Dowling) and Michael Cullen, aged 20 and a van driver from Charlemont Street.
 
The Hugeunot people are fascinating and you can see their influence in Northern Ireland in names like Frizzell and Molyneaux and LeFevre, but I often wonder about their background.

We know them to be great artisans, tradesmen and skilled craftsmen but which came first? Where they ordinary Frenchmen, with their pastis-sipping, shrugging shouldered, laissez faire attitude to the world, who upon discovering protestantism suddenly became God-fearing, hard-working, early-rising, no-nonsense Stakhanovites, in contrast to their shiftless, lazy popish fellow countrymen? Or were they already hard-working, solid burghers who by virtue of their outlook were ripe for a religious and political system that rejected the established order of aristocracy and the Catholic church?

I suspect it was the latter. You see something similar in Latin America today where the fastest growing religion is evangelical protestantism and this is among the middle class, aspirational types (something similar is evident among Chinese communities in Asia).

It's not hard to see why the French state felt so threatened by them.
A very consise history here Huguenots
 
The Hugeunot people are fascinating and you can see their influence in Northern Ireland in names like Frizzell and Molyneaux and LeFevre, but I often wonder about their background.

We know them to be great artisans, tradesmen and skilled craftsmen but which came first? Where they ordinary Frenchmen, with their pastis-sipping, shrugging shouldered, laissez faire attitude to the world, who upon discovering protestantism suddenly became God-fearing, hard-working, early-rising, no-nonsense Stakhanovites, in contrast to their shiftless, lazy popish fellow countrymen? Or were they already hard-working, solid burghers who by virtue of their outlook were ripe for a religious and political system that rejected the established order of aristocracy and the Catholic church?

I suspect it was the latter. You see something similar in Latin America today where the fastest growing religion is evangelical protestantism and this is among the middle class, aspirational types (something similar is evident among Chinese communities in Asia).

It's not hard to see why the French state felt so threatened by them.
I have never heard any suggestion otherwise.
 
Regarding the second paragraph. Theres a funny story about an American,Bud Wolfe who was flying in one of the RAF Eagle Sqns early in the war. His Spitfire crashed in Donegal,(It was salvaged a number of years ago, Dan Snow did a programme about it, and got one of its machine guns firing again) Any hoo. Bud was sent of to the Curragh for internment, and fell into the routine, where they were given weekend passes and an allowance to go out to local towns on their own parole. Bud having come over to fight the Hun, uses this parole to return to NI. On reporting to the senior officer in Belfast, feeling pretty good about making His 'escape' The Senior officer asks if He'd given His word as an officer that He wouldn't attempt to escape while on parole. Bud says Yes, but theres a war on ,and He'd come to fight it. The Senior Officer calls Him a bally disgrace, and sends Him back. Where he promptly gets filled in by some of His fellow internees ,as the parole system was suspended after His legging it. The poor lad came to Britain to fight fascism, and instead found Himself in something akin to an Ealing Comedy. IIRC He was released a few months later. Went on to fly for the USAAF, And then the USAF in Korea and early in the Vietnam war.
The dates are relevant. Bud Wolfe crashed on 30/11/41 and returned to NI on 13/12/41. Between those dates Pearl Harbor was attacked (7/12/41) and (for reasons known only to himself) Hitler declared war on the USA (11/12/41).

Wolfe had signed a parole chit saying he'd return. He'd left his gloves behind, so returned and left again with the gloves. He said he'd returned as promised, the RAF disagreed.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Please correct me if I'm wrong but when flying by chopper over Lough Erne to land at St Angelo, we used to see one or two small US Aircraft, or parts of aircraft, below the water, I seem to remember a pilot telling me that due to the hot summer '1975' the lough waters were much lower than normal?

But what a lovely place that was!
 
Please correct me if I'm wrong but when flying by chopper over Lough Erne to land at St Angelo, we used to see one or two small US Aircraft, or parts of aircraft, below the water, I seem to remember a pilot telling me that due to the hot summer '1975' the lough waters were much lower than normal?

But what a lovely place that was!
There were a few flying boat bases on the lough. For the Battle of the Atlantic. Probably Catalinas or Sunderlands.
 
23 March 1920

General Sir Nevil Macready was appointed Commander in Chief of British forces in Ireland replacing General Frederick Shaw. A year previously he had written to Ian McPherson on his appointment as Chief Secretary that “I loathe the country you are going to and its people with a depth deeper than the sea and more violent than that which I feel against the Boche.” It was bound to end well then.
 

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