Irish War of Independence centenary

An interesting article from today's Irish Times. It mentions a shootout between IRA and B Specials during the Truce - the Clones Affray which may be of interest to @British_And_Proud


 
22 January 1972

Death of Ned Broy, former member of G Division, DMP and one of Michael Collins inside men. Broy served as a Colonel in the Free State Army during the Civil War and subsequently rose to be Commissioner of the Garda Síochána. He died in Dublin and is interred in Clonbulloge, Co. Offaly.


 
24 January 1920

In an IRA attack on Baltinglass RIC barracks, Constable James Malynn was badly wounded. He will die as a result of his injuries on the 1st December 1920.
 
22 January 1972

Death of Ned Broy, former member of G Division, DMP and one of Michael Collins inside men. Broy served as a Colonel in the Free State Army during the Civil War and subsequently rose to be Commissioner of the Garda Síochána. He died in Dublin and is interred in Clonbulloge, Co. Offaly.


A very interesting life. The book 'The Spy in the Castle' by David Neligan is well worth a read and details the work of the author, Ned Broy and James McNamara, all informants who fed information to Michael Collins.
 
26 January 1920
The Church of Mary Immaculate Refuge of Sinners in Rathmines, Dublin burnt down due to an electrical fault. The local IRA were in a bit of bother as they had an arms dump in a cellar.

The Rathmines Church Fire, 1920.

27 January 1920
Constable Malynn (or McGlyn), who was wounded in the IRA attack on Baltinglass RIC Barracks, underwent an operation to extract a bullet at Mercer's Hospital, Dublin. He was said to be recovering as well as can be expected.

While Malynn was on the table a fierce storm passed over Dublin, wreaking havoc. The gable end of 85 Railway Street collapsed. Fifteen residents of the tenement house felt the walls buckling and fled. Near Artane, two boys were on their way to the Industrial School when a tree fell on them. One of the boys, Francis Keane, subsequently died of his injuries. Clanwilliam House, badly damaged during the Easter Rising, completely collapsed.

28 January 1920
20 RIC Officers from Belfast were transferred into Thurles, replacing the officers who had participated in the reprisal following the shooting dead of Constable Luke Finnegan.

21 new recruits for the RIC arrived from Britain. Several of them were reported to have left the Metropolitan Police in London, presumably attracted by the better pay on offer for getting shot in Ireland.

Most of the above from @131 Weeks
 
30 January 1920
A policy of mass arrest of republicans was instituted with 57 arrests. Those arrested would be deported to prisons in England within weeks. By 14th April, the number of prisoners would reach 317 with 27 being IRA brigade commandants or staff. This policy backfired somewhat due to the prisoners going on hunger strike.

The recently elected municipal councils met across the country and elected Mayors. Most of the elected Mayors represented Sinn Féin.

Alderman Thomas Kelly was unanimously elected Lord Mayor of Dublin. Thomas was not present himself due to his serving a bit of porridge in Wormwood Scrubs.


Tomás Mac Curtain (above) was elected Lord Mayor in Cork. Mac Curtain was Brigade Commander of Cork No 1 Brigade in his spare time. He will be killed in his home by members of the RIC in March. In 1940 the little lad in the kilt will be sentenced to death for the murder of a Garda Detective in Cork. The death sentence was commuted to imprisonment and Mac Curtain was released after seven years.

Michael O’Callaghan was elected Mayor of Limerick. He served out his term and was killed in March 1921. His successor as Mayor, George Clancy, will be killed the same night.

Hugh O'Doherty was elected Mayor of Derry, the first Catholic Mayor of Derry to hold the post since 1688. O’Doherty was a Nationalist Party member, not Sinn Féin. He had been a supporter of Parnell in his earlier career. He served as Mayor until 1923.

About the only place that did not elect a nationalist Mayor was Belfast where William Coates was elected Mayor.
 

Mike Barton

War Hero



Hugh O'Doherty was elected Mayor of Derry, the first Catholic Mayor of Derry to hold the post since 1688. O’Doherty was a Nationalist Party member, not Sinn Féin. He had been a supporter of Parnell in his earlier career. He served as Mayor until 1923.

About the only place that did not elect a nationalist Mayor was Belfast where William Coates was elected Mayor.
The election of O'Doherty caused huge shockwaves to the Unionist establishment, to have the Maiden City finally taken by those uppity papists was intolerable and it led to the Unionist government in Stormont as soon as it was established to immediately abolish proportional representation to make sure (along with a good bit of gerrymandering) that no one actually representing the majority of Derry's citizens would ever be allowed to run the city, heaven forfend.

It also led to increasing sectarian tensions in Derry that were to erupt in a week of virtual civil war in June (as you will no doubt come to in due course).
 
2 February 1920

A military patrol in Limerick encountered a large group of civilians in O’Connell Street which they forced into a side street called Roche’s Street. Here they came under fire which they returned. During the exchange two civilians, Richard O'Dwyer and Lena Johnson were hit. O’Dwyer was tending the bar of a pub on Roche’s Street and was hit and killed instantly. Poor Lena must have been the unluckiest woman in Ireland that night. She was mortally wounded while going home from work across Sarsfield Bridge, a full half mile from the scene of the firefight. Taken to Barrington’s Hospital she died the following night.
 
3 February 1920

8456 Private James Barnes, 52nd Welsh Regiment died in King George V Military Hospital in Dublin of an accidental gunshot wound.

Over in London, three Irish Guardsmen, J. Carthy, J. Flanagan, and P. Moffat appeared before a court-martial in Westminster Guildhall, charged with mutiny. The trio had woken about 100 Irish recruits in Caterham Barracks to help them release another who had been arrested. The plot was foiled by their officers swiftly taking control. The presiding judge asked Carthy was he sober or drunk when he incited the mutiny. Carthy replied 'I cannot say sir'.
 
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6 February 1920

De Valera gave an interview to the New York correspondent of the Westminster Gazette in which he said that Ireland was ready to offer international guarantees to England that the country would not be used as a base to attack England – he compared such a guarantee with the Platt Amendment to the Cuban Settlement. This was seized on by de Valera’s enemies in the States John Devoy and Judge Coholan who said that de Valera was preparing to compromise on full independence.
 
7 February 1920

Constable Edward Mulholland was fatally wounded by Constable Danagher at Moyne RIC Barracks in County Tipperary. Danagher was unloading his revolver when it accidentally discharged. Mullholland died the next day. He was 35 years old and a native of Castlebar, Co Mayo with ten years RIC service, mainly in Belfast.
 
9 February 1920

Capture of Castlemartyr RIC Barracks in East Cork. Diarmuid O'Hurley, OC Midleton Company, I.R.A., came up with a rather complicated plan to take the barracks. This involved capturing as many of the barracks garrison as possible beforehand. First up were Sergeant O'Brien and Constable Collins, who were on duty at a fair in Midleton.

As the two men cycled home to Castlemartyr an IRA party ambushed them by pushing a farm cart onto the road from a gateway as they cycled past. The two men were knocked off their bikes and swiftly overpowered. Two men then went to Castlemartyr where they captured a Constable Hanrahan as he left the barracks about 7 o’clock. It was then discovered, presumably from Hanrahan, that Constable Hassett was at his own house in the town, and that another constable was on leave. That left three men in the barracks.

The next part of the plan was to cut the telephone line from the barracks as there was a military garrison just three miles away at Killeagh Aerodrome. When the main body of attackers arrived in Castlemartyr they couldn’t locate the two volunteers holding Hanrahan. O'Hurley went ahead with the attack and knocked at the barrack door. Constable Lee, opened the door which had a running chain on the inside. Both men thrust their revolvers through the opening and fired. Both missed and O’Hurley forced the door open injuring Lee with a blow of his revolver. O'Hurley and his men were quickly inside the building. Sergeant O'Sullivan, realising the futility of resistance, surrendered, and the IRA made off with all the military equipment from the barracks.


147966 L/Bombardier Benjamin Shreeve, 129th Bty, RFA died in Cahir Military Bks, Co. Tipperary of an accidental gunshot wound. Aged 22 and from Norwich, he is interred in Cahir Military Graveyard.
 
12 February 1920

Constable Michael Neenan aged 32 died from wounds received during an I.R.A. attack on Allihies RIC barracks County Cork. The IRA, led by Sean Hales with about 20 IRA men took part. They blew a hole in the wall of the barracks with a mine constructed by Cornelius O'Sullivan. The RIC refused to surrender.

The Officer Commanding East Wicklow Brigade Seamus O’Brien was shot dead outside his shop in Market Square, Rathdrum, County Wicklow. O’Brien was a partner in the business O’Brien and Walsh and had just recently been married. He was standing outside his shop with two other men when two R.I.C., constables- Mulligan and Dougherty, passed. At the inquest into O’Brien’s death the R.I.C. men stated that as they passed a shot was fired hitting Constable Mulligan. Both R.I.C. men returned fire and reported seeing one of the three men fall. The inquest returned a verdict that O’Brien died as a result of a bullet wound inflicted by one of the police men and they were not satisfied that the policeman’s wound was caused by a bullet and not satisfied that shots were fired at the police. Matt Kavanagh, a Volunteer with A Company, 4th Battalion, Wicklow Brigade in his statement to the Bureau of Military History said that O’Brien was shot in an ambush of the R.I.C. men.

0865 Pte Guy Roberts and 01907 Pte William Pearce, both 1st Bn, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry stationed at Finner Camp, were drowned when they were swept out to sea from rocks at Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal. Pearce was 17 and Roberts 18. Both are interred at Finner Cemetery.
 

Mike Barton

War Hero
9 February 1920

Capture of Castlemartyr RIC Barracks in East Cork. Diarmuid O'Hurley, OC Midleton Company, I.R.A., came up with a rather complicated plan to take the barracks. This involved capturing as many of the barracks garrison as possible beforehand. First up were Sergeant O'Brien and Constable Collins, who were on duty at a fair in Midleton.

As the two men cycled home to Castlemartyr an IRA party ambushed them by pushing a farm cart onto the road from a gateway as they cycled past. The two men were knocked off their bikes and swiftly overpowered. Two men then went to Castlemartyr where they captured a Constable Hanrahan as he left the barracks about 7 o’clock. It was then discovered, presumably from Hanrahan, that Constable Hassett was at his own house in the town, and that another constable was on leave. That left three men in the barracks.

The next part of the plan was to cut the telephone line from the barracks as there was a military garrison just three miles away at Killeagh Aerodrome. When the main body of attackers arrived in Castlemartyr they couldn’t locate the two volunteers holding Hanrahan. O'Hurley went ahead with the attack and knocked at the barrack door. Constable Lee, opened the door which had a running chain on the inside. Both men thrust their revolvers through the opening and fired. Both missed and O’Hurley forced the door open injuring Lee with a blow of his revolver. O'Hurley and his men were quickly inside the building. Sergeant O'Sullivan, realising the futility of resistance, surrendered, and the IRA made off with all the military equipment from the barracks.


147966 L/Bombardier Benjamin Shreeve, 129th Bty, RFA died in Cahir Military Bks, Co. Tipperary of an accidental gunshot wound. Aged 22 and from Norwich, he is interred in Cahir Military Graveyard.
So they did capture at least one barracks, I thought the generally accepted wisdom was that no IRA attack against an occupied RIC barracks ever succeeded?
 

par avion

War Hero
A very interesting life. The book 'The Spy in the Castle' by David Neligan is well worth a read and details the work of the author, Ned Broy and James McNamara, all informants who fed information to Michael Collins.
Neligan was quite a dab hand with explosives and blowing up rebel rebels. Some place called Ballyseedy.
 
So they did capture at least one barracks, I thought the generally accepted wisdom was that no IRA attack against an occupied RIC barracks ever succeeded?
I think most of the time that wasn't the aim. I seem to recall enough examples given them seizing weapons or causing damage enough to cause the barracks to be abandoned
 
14 February 1920

Ballytrain Barracks Attack, Co. Monaghan. Led by Ernie O'Malley and Eoin O'Duffy about 120 IRA men were involved in the attack, armed with a dozen rifles, twenty revolvers and about thirty shotguns. The majority of that 120 would have been involved in felling trees, cutting telephone wires, scouting for reinforcements and the like. The barracks was defended by six RIC men (Sgts Lawton and Graham and Constables Gallagher, Murtagh, McDonnell and one other). At first the RIC refused to surrender but they did after the IRA blow a hole in the gable end of the barracks with gelignite stolen from Monaghan County Council. Six carbines and ammunition in the barracks were taken by the IRA and the surrendered RIC were released. Among the IRA who took part in the attack were Dan Hogan (a future Chief of Staff of the Free State Army), Seamus McKeena, Terry Magee, James Flynn, Phil Marron, P J Daly, John Donnolly, Thomas Donnelly, Patrick McDonnell, Charles Walton, Barney Marron and Patrick McCabe.
 
Carrigtwohill Barracks had been captured on 2nd January, probably by the same men as Castlemartyr and Carrigtwohill are only a few miles apart.


From January 1920, arms raids of Royal Irish Constabulary barracks began. Those barracks in rural areas were the first to be targeted as many of them were not overly defended. Successful arms raids and the taking of mail for intelligence purposes gave many local IRA units purpose without real exposure to injury and death.

Historian Dr Joost Augusteijn in ‘The Atlas of the Irish Revolution’ details that by the summer of 1920, almost one third of all RIC barracks had been evacuated. By the end of 1920, a total of 553 barracks were destroyed.
 

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