Irish War of Independence centenary

Mike Barton

War Hero
25 October 1919
The first British Home Championship football match since 1914 took place at Windsor Park, Belfast. Ireland and England drew 1-1. Jack Cock and Jimmy Ferris were the scorers.


Interesting that the "Ireland" team played at Windsor Park in Belfast, as they technically still do as that is the home ground of the Irish Football Association and the team now known as "Northern Ireland" is in fact the direct heir of the old 32-county united Ireland side. The current "Ireland" football team is in fact the partitionist breakaway 26-county "Republic of Ireland" side.

If I am not wrong as late as the 1970s when Northern Ireland played in the old British Home Internationals it did so as Ireland, as that is what the team was then still recognised as.
 
Interesting that the "Ireland" team played at Windsor Park in Belfast, as they technically still do as that is the home ground of the Irish Football Association and the team now known as "Northern Ireland" is in fact the direct heir of the old 32-county united Ireland side. The current "Ireland" football team is in fact the partitionist breakaway 26-county "Republic of Ireland" side.

If I am not wrong as late as the 1970s when Northern Ireland played in the old British Home Internationals it did so as Ireland, as that is what the team was then still recognised as.
I think it was FIFA that forced the two sides to adopt distinguishing names as up until late 1940s the IFA wasn't affiliated with FIFA. Players could legally play for both Irish teams as NI only competed in the Home Championship and friendlies. When NI entered the 1950 World Cup qualifiers, as did the ROI, it was discovered that one player had been representing both Irelands in the same competition. There had been a few dual internationals over the years.

The breakaway of what became the Football Association of Ireland was a side effect of the war and we'll be getting to it next year I think.
 
14 November 1919

Some updates from @131 Weeks.

11 November 1919

As the security forces raided the Dáil offices, Michael Collins escaped through a skylight and made his way next door to the Standard Hotel.

The two minutes silence was observed in part in Dublin at 11am to mark the first anniversary of the Armistice. However, while the students of Trinity College were observing the silence, a group from University College Dublin marched down Grafton Street singing The Soldier’s Song. The Trinner’s Chaps responded with God Save the King and 350 of them chased the UCD Chavs up Dame Street. At Earlsfort Terrace, UCD reinforcements arrived in the shape of a group of Botany students and a pitched battle erupted on the streets.

The RIC closed barracks in Mullaghgarve, Rantoge and Drumsna, Co. Leitrim and Redcross barracks in Wicklow.

It was a bad day for Ecumenical matters as Yitzhak Herzog, the Chief Rabbi of Ireland, took issue with comments by the Bishop of Limerick suggesting that indecent women's clothes were being made by Jewish designers in Paris who were against Christianity. The Herzog family moved to Palestine in 1936 where Chaim, the Rabbi’s son would serve in Haganah, in the British Army in WW2 and the Israeli DF post-Independence. He became the President of Israel in 1983.

12 November 1919

Nine men who were arrested yesterday in the offices of Dáil Éireann were charged with membership or working for an illegal organisation before the Southern Police Court, Dublin. Each man received a sentence of two months in prison

In a ceremony organised by members of the Nationalist Veterans Association, . Mary Kettle, and her daughter, Betty laid a wreath in memory of her husband, Tom Kettle, nationalist and UCD Commerce lecturer, who was killed at Ginchy in September 1916.

To My Daughter Betty, The Gift of God
by Thomas Michael Kettle
dated ‘In the field, before Guillemont, Somme, Sept. 4, 1916’.

In wiser days, my darling rosebud, blown
To beauty proud as was your mother's prime,
In that desired, delayed, incredible time,
You'll ask why I abandoned you, my own,
And the dear heart that was your baby throne,
To dice with death. And oh! they'll give you rhyme
And reason: some will call the thing sublime,
And some decry it in a knowing tone.
So here, while the mad guns curse overhead,
And tired men sigh with mud for couch and floor,
Know that we fools, now with the foolish dead,
Died not for flag, nor King, nor Emperor,—
But for a dream, born in a herdsman's shed,
And for the secret Scripture of the poor.


The ceremony was attended amongst others by former North Tipperary M.P and Army officer, John Lymbrick Esmonde, from Borrisokane, Co. Tipperary.


Some men of a party of 9 IRA Volunteers, under command of Michael Fitzmartin, were captured by RIC Officers. When their comrades tried to free the prisoners, the RIC took cover in the abandoned Cooraclare RIC barracks. Gunfire was exchanged until reinforcements arrived to drive the IRA off. The barracks was subsequently burned by the IRA.

Maam RIC Barracks in Co. Galway was attacked by the IRA. There does not appear to have been any casualties.
13 November 1919

The Boer War memorial at Connaught Avenue, Cork, was damaged by an explosion.

Ernest Blythe married Ann McHugh. Blythe was from Co. Antrim, a Protestant and of a Unionist family. He took the soup whilst working in Dublin as a young man and had the distinction of simultaneous membership of the IRB and the Orange Order. He spent much of the war in prison, supported the Treaty and went on to a long political career as a Cumann na nGaedhael/Fine Gael Minister. McHugh was a nationalist educator who established Scoil Bride with Louise Gavan Duffy in 1917.

Local IRA men raided the Ormonde Hotel in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. The intention was to seize weapons belonging to Hope Nelson, a retired army officer who lived there. Among the IRA men who took part in the raid were Thomas Halpin, Jerry Davin, Tommy Smith and Billy Myles. A hotel employee named Reggie Whelan suffered a heart attack brought on by the shock and died next day.



 
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14 November 1919

There was a heavy fall of snow in Dublin. The lakes in St. Stephen’s Green froze hard enough to allow people walk on the ice. The students of UCD, continuing the jolly japes of earlier in the week, congregated there in large numbers. The DMP took a dim view when they were bombarded with snowballs, declared the cohort an illegal assembly and baton charged the bar stewards.
 
16 November 1919

As the snow continued to fall in Dublin, the newspapers published incriminating photos of the DMP brutally snowballing the helpless students. That would never happen these days, the lads would have those identifying numbers off their epaulettes in the blink of an eye.



Meanwhile in Cork harbour the IRA raided a German registered vessel, the Minnie Horn, and made off with the radio equipment.

There are reports that the Kynoch's cordite plant in Arklow is to close. At the height of the war it employed over 3,000 people. In September 1917, 28 people were killed when a massive explosion ripped through the factory. I’d never heard of this incident so thanks to @131Weeks for that.

An explosive catastrophe – An Irishman’s Diary on the Kynoch disaster in Arklow in 1917
 
I missed a few days due to work interfering with my social media activities.

18 November 1919

A fishing boat investigating a floating object in the water off Cape Clear, Co. Cork detonated a mine. John Leonard, Michael Cadogan, Patrick Molloy, and Eugene Daly were killed.
19 November 1919
Ten men from the 5th Battalion, Cork No. 3 Brigade, IRA sneaked on-board a Royal Navy vessel anchored at Bantry, Co. Cork, held-up the crew and made away with ten rifles, ten revolvers and ammunition. This event may have taken place on the 17th. Accounts vary.
 
23 November 1919

Members of the Irish Brigade in Germany during the War. Henry Quinlisk is the man on the right. Courtesy of @131Weeks​

The DMP raided a house at 44 Mountjoy Square in Dublin looking for Michael Collins. Collins had been made aware of the raid and escaped. He has been betrayed by a letter from one Henry Quinlisk to the authorities in Dublin Castle which had been intercepted by Ned Broy.

Henry Quinlisk had been a Corporal in the Royal Irish Regiment who had been captured at La Basee in October 1914. While a POW in Germany he was recruited into the Irish Brigade by Sir Roger Casement. Casement hoped that the Germans would arm and equip his recruits to fight in Ireland in the planned rebellion in 1916. The plan failed in one key aspect, only 56 men volunteered to join.

After the war Quinlisk approached Collins for financial assistance based on his membership of the Irish Brigade. He received some money from Collins but blew it on gambling and further funds were not forthcoming. He turned coat and offered his assistance to Dublin Castle to set up Collins for arrest. After the failure of the raid on Mountjoy Square, Quinlisk moved to Cork. He was abducted and shot dead by the IRA in February 1920.
 
23 November 1919

Members of the Irish Brigade in Germany during the War. Henry Quinlisk is the man on the right. Courtesy of @131Weeks​

The DMP raided a house at 44 Mountjoy Square in Dublin looking for Michael Collins. Collins had been made aware of the raid and escaped. He has been betrayed by a letter from one Henry Quinlisk to the authorities in Dublin Castle which had been intercepted by Ned Broy.

Henry Quinlisk had been a Corporal in the Royal Irish Regiment who had been captured at La Basee in October 1914. While a POW in Germany he was recruited into the Irish Brigade by Sir Roger Casement. Casement hoped that the Germans would arm and equip his recruits to fight in Ireland in the planned rebellion in 1916. The plan failed in one key aspect, only 56 men volunteered to join.

After the war Quinlisk approached Collins for financial assistance based on his membership of the Irish Brigade. He received some money from Collins but blew it on gambling and further funds were not forthcoming. He turned coat and offered his assistance to Dublin Castle to set up Collins for arrest. After the failure of the raid on Mountjoy Square, Quinlisk moved to Cork. He was abducted and shot dead by the IRA in February 1920.
A fine body of men!

The man fouth from the left is Daniel Bailey, who was landed at Banna Strand from a U-boat with Roger Casement in 1916, turned King's Evidence (possibly he'd been told to do so by Casement) at their trial for treason. The prosecution offered no evidence against Bailey and he rejoined the British forces for the rest of WW1.

 
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I have to confess(!) that is not quite the impression given in the 5 minutes I spent skimming McQuaid's Wikipedia entry:


Whilst they (DeValera and McQuaid) were good friends and McQuaid was influential in some areas, there were also some quite significant disagreements, with McQuaid being on the losing side of several such.

I did not come away from the Wiki article with any great feelings of condemnation towards McQuaid, quite the opposite, in fact.

I'm sure a more thorough reading would be beneficial in understanding the negative influence of the RC Church on Eire's political setting, but I suspect that there would be, as in Brexit, rather a lot of winnowing to do to get even an approximately balanced overview, with good on both sides suffering according to the presenter of the 'facts'.

Archbishop McQuaid was family, a cousin of my paternal Grandfather… invoking his name struck sheer fear into anyone who crossed your path in 60's Ireland.
See my Aunt who I was staying with taking me down to the CBS after a beating by Brother Marr after I refused to reply to him in Irish -
"Do you you know who Archbishop McQuaid is?'
"I course I do"
"Do you want me to ring him and tell him what you just did to his cousin?
Sheer terror on his face - he never laid a finger on me again.

No ifs, no buts or maybes; if I'd stayed in Ireland my future was greased well by church connections- I WAS going to Kierans College, I was going to enter the Civil Service, I was going to get a good job, the Church would see to that - but, the downside was the Church would have owned my soul and I'd have had to repay on demand. So you got along to get along - and the Churches power and influence extended ever further

And that how the Church got away with it and ran Ireland as a Papal Colony from the 20's until the 70's - its total dead hand on Irelands soul that meant it really could reach out and touch ANYONE - from Paddy the road sweep, to any TD. They wanted dirty deeds done cheap, a Priest came to see you - they had the dirt of everyone - nothing was ever in writing, all very Mafia.
Go down the Guards Barracks to complain to the Guards Brother Finlan's been messing with the small boys?
Before you even made it home, the Priest was informed of everything you said and the Wheels started grinding - snide comments from the pulpit by the Priest in Mass on Sunday - I'm sorry Micheal, I'm having to let you go, you know how it is when you turned up for work on Monday - and another family packed its bags for England and exile.


You had to live it to believe it. A totally soul crushing existence in a country turned into a de facto religious Ghetto -

The similarity to the Nazis was striking when you looked back

Der Born again nationalist Fuherer - DeValera wasn't born in Ireland either
One approved State Religion - Irelands very own National Socialism
A Gestapo - The Church, with McQuad as Himmler
An SS - the similarity was striking, idiotically pure zealots with absolute power dressed head to foot in black - the Brothers were the Liebstandart SS - The Catholic Churches shock truppen. Failed to notice the Brothers walking up the other side of the road and didn't call across, Good Morning Brothers? They'd cross over and give you a good hard box round the ear to remind you next time.
All media censored, even the TV was on a different frequency and standard to the rest of the world to stop you seeing what the outside world looked like - and the Papers! A copy of the NotW from NI (hard to get and expensive) looked like an origami cut out after the censor had finished with it. Yes, all outside publications were liberally scissored of anything subversive.

The Church was the State, the State was the Church.

Its better now, but you can still get things done if you know the right people to talk to and invoke the right names

When my Mad Mother moved back in 1996, she couldn't get any local OAP benefits as she's not paid any stamps - I flew across and made an appointment for a pleasant talk with the senior chap at the welfare office - after a preamble, my full name rang a bell
Are you be chance any relation of •••••••? (We have the same full name)
Yes, he was my Grandad (He was one of the senior cogs in the Ministry of Works in the 60's)
Ah he was a good man, leave it with me, I'll see what I can do.

A couple of days later, my mother was quite surprised to find her PRSI stamps were all paid, and the nice man handed her all her pension, travel and MEDICARE entitlement cards - its like she'd never left and worked paying full stamps in Ireland all her life.

Life in a totally corrupt country.
 
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And if you can stomach it, its a great film, 100% on the nail of the harsh and brutal reality of Church Run Ireland - go find Song for a Raggy Boy.
 
And if you can stomach it, its a great film, 100% on the nail of the harsh and brutal reality of Church Run Ireland - go find Song for a Raggy Boy.
I'd thought of that film whilst reading your previous post.

It's on Youtube.
 
Archbishop McQuaid was family, a cousin of my paternal Grandfather… invoking his name struck sheer fear into anyone who crossed your path in 60's Ireland.
See my Aunt who I was staying with taking me down to the CBS after a beating by Brother Marr after I refused to reply to him in Irish -
"Do you you know who Archbishop McQuaid is?'
"I course I do"
"Do you want me to ring him and tell him what you just did to his cousin?
Sheer terror on his face - he never laid a finger on me again.

...

The Church was the State, the State was the Church.

Its better now, but you can still get things done if you know the right people to talk to and invoke the right names

When my Mad Mother moved back in 1996, she couldn't get any local OAP benefits as she's not paid any stamps - I flew across and made an appointment for a pleasant talk with the senior chap at the welfare office - after a preamble, my full name rang a bell
Are you be chance any relation of •••••••? (We have the same full name)
Yes, he was my Grandad (He was one of the senior cogs in the Ministry of Works in the 60's)
Ah he was a good man, leave it with me, I'll see what I can do.

A couple of days later, my mother was quite surprised to find her PRSI stamps were all paid, and the nice man handed her all her pension, travel and MEDICARE entitlement cards - its like she'd never left and worked paying full stamps in Ireland all her life.

Life in a totally corrupt country.
Very informative. Cheers.

My brother's ex is from a strongly Catholic family, but apart from the priest liking a drink now and again, my (CofE) brother thought the Church was a positive influence. The only RC clergy I've had anything to do with have, for some reason or another, been Jesuits and I thought they were all right - far more relaxed and humourous than I'd imagined. Not sure if this a reflection of the different society in the UK or a sign of the times.

...

Totally corrupt? Well, SWMBO's worried about her pension, I've got Irish ancestry and I could convert ...
 
Very informative. Cheers.

My brother's ex is from a strongly Catholic family, but apart from the priest liking a drink now and again, my (CofE) brother thought the Church was a positive influence. The only RC clergy I've had anything to do with have, for some reason or another, been Jesuits and I thought they were all right - far more relaxed and humourous than I'd imagined. Not sure if this a reflection of the different society in the UK or a sign of the times.

...

Totally corrupt? Well, SWMBO's worried about her pension, I've got Irish ancestry and I could convert ...


Jesuits?

Very small footprint in Ireland and hugely respected for their academic excellence. They had a few bad sorts, but bye and large genuine scholars wanting to do their best for their charges.


Christian Brothers?

Bastards the lot of them, they were big on sports, Brother Marr was a bear of man who liked his boxing, loved to use pre teen boys as punchbags - what's a black eye and a few cracked ribs between friends?


De La Salle Brothers?

A bit better, more in into buggering the boys that beating them.

Priests?

Most were too drunk to get it up, a and if you were fly on your feet and a 'bold boy', they were no real danger. Easier for them to go to the Convent and shag one of the novices with the Mother Superiors blessing.

Worst of the lot?

The Nuns, the Sisters of Mercy - if ever there was a sick joke as that misnamed lot.

Bitter women who took out their celibate rage with unquenchable fury on their charges. They had the boys up to Infants, but that meant nothing, they still ripped into you with a fury.
After infant school it was girls only and then they really got mean. Sister Anuncaiata was a legend in the town.
Her party trick was to make every girl line up each morning and hoist up their skirts and drop their knickers. Any signs of impurity and less than perfect cleanliness - yes, she'd closely examine and sniff. She'd strap their arses until they were raw. A sadistic sexual predator. Her favourites got 'special' treatment, they got to spend the weekend on retreat with her.
And of course, girls were pimped out to visiting powerful people and Priests in return for political and financial favours - if they got pregnant? They just sent them away to the The Magdalene Laundries. Great system.


And how many were ever prosecuted?

A scant handfull. The Church had all the dirt on all the Politicians, Guards and Judges, so a deal was done.

'We'll pull out of education and all retire to Craggy Island and overseas, you'll lose all your files and we'll lose all our dirty on you'.
 
Jesuits?

Very small footprint in Ireland and hugely respected for their academic excellence. They had a few bad sorts, but bye and large genuine scholars wanting to do their best for their charges.


Christian Brothers?

Bastards the lot of them, they were big on sports, Brother Marr was a bear of man who liked his boxing, loved to use pre teen boys as punchbags - what's a black eye and a few cracked ribs between friends?


De La Salle Brothers?

A bit better, more in into buggering the boys that beating them.

Priests?

Most were too drunk to get it up, a and if you were fly on your feet and a 'bold boy', they were no real danger. Easier for them to go to the Convent and shag one of the novices with the Mother Superiors blessing.

Worst of the lot?

The Nuns, the Sisters of Mercy - if ever there was a sick joke as that misnamed lot.

Bitter women who took out their celibate rage with unquenchable fury on their charges. They had the boys up to Infants, but that meant nothing, they still ripped into you with a fury.
After infant school it was girls only and then they really got mean. Sister Anuncaiata was a legend in the town.
Her party trick was to make every girl line up each morning and hoist up their skirts and drop their knickers. Any signs of impurity and less than perfect cleanliness - yes, she'd closely examine and sniff. She'd strap their arses until they were raw. A sadistic sexual predator. Her favourites got 'special' treatment, they got to spend the weekend on retreat with her.
And of course, girls were pimped out to visiting powerful people and Priests in return for political and financial favours - if they got pregnant? They just sent them away to the The Magdalene Laundries. Great system.


And how many were ever prosecuted?

A scant handfull. The Church had all the dirt on all the Politicians, Guards and Judges, so a deal was done.

'We'll pull out of education and all retire to Craggy Island and overseas, you'll lose all your files and we'll lose all our dirty on you'.
Fascinating, and it confirms what I've always thought. The Troubles were bound to happen because the Protestants in NI were not going to let THAT happen to them.

I've got an Irish uncle through marriage. My auntie was prepared to convert to Roman Catholicism to marry him (a big move in the 60s in Bishop Auckland) but the local RC priest wasn't interested, and told them that if they did get married then any kids that they had would be bastards.

Auntie was quite upset but they went to the RC priest in Aycliffe who told them to ignore "that Irish prick", that he was more than happy to marry them, and that she didn't need to convert.

End result, I have a lovely Anglo Irish cousin, although she can be a bit of a brain donor at times. And my Irish, republican uncle has two nephews through marriage who did Banner tours, and a grandson in The Rifles.
 
Fascinating, and it confirms what I've always thought. The Troubles were bound to happen because the Protestants in NI were not going to let THAT happen to them.

I've got an Irish uncle through marriage. My auntie was prepared to convert to Roman Catholicism to marry him (a big move in the 60s in Bishop Auckland) but the local RC priest wasn't interested, and told them that if they did get married then any kids that they had would be bastards.

Auntie was quite upset but they went to the RC priest in Aycliffe who told them to ignore "that Irish prick", that he was more than happy to marry them, and that she didn't need to convert.

End result, I have a lovely Anglo Irish cousin, although she can be a bit of a brain donor at times. And my Irish, republican uncle has two nephews through marriage who did Banner tours, and a grandson in The Rifles.

Goresbridge in 1978
biggest employer in the area, Connolys mills was outside the village where my Godfather was maintenance foreman. I think we had as many cars in our drive in England in 1978 as that whole village.
At the time it joined the EEC in 1973, Ireland was the second poorest country in Europe, only Portugal was poorer and more backward, just. It really was a huge culture shock going back over to visit in the 70’s after escaping to a country were hot running water wasn’t a novel experience,
 
A fine body of men!
The man fouth from the left is Daniel Bailey, who was landed at Banna Strand from a U-boat with Roger Casement in 1916, turned King's Evidence (possibly he'd been told to do so by Casement) at their trial for treason. The prosecution offered no evidence against Bailey and he rejoined the British forces for the rest of WW1.
His career as a German soldier must have endeared him to the Mess. :D
 
.... It really was a huge culture shock going back over to visit in the 70’s after escaping to a country were hot running water wasn’t a novel experience,
I remember English and Canadian cousins visiting my home in the 70s who were somewhat taken aback that we had no running water. My first job as a 9 year old was drawing water from a well with milk churn and wheelbarrow. I smile every time I see one of those ads about some little African bint walking 5 miles for a bucket of water. Oxfam never ran ads about poor Gary Cooper in Co. Waterford. The cúnts.
 
...Christian Brothers?

Bastards the lot of them, they were big on sports, Brother Marr was a bear of man who liked his boxing, loved to use pre teen boys as punchbags - what's a black eye and a few cracked ribs between friends?
I went to the Brothers in Secondary School and they weren't that bad actually. We were probably lucky. The lay teachers were far worse. I have fond memories of Brother Brett, a giant of a man who wouldn't hurt a fly and who taught us Latin for three years. I don't remember him ever even raising his voice. He taught us to sing Molly Malone in Latin.
 
I remember English and Canadian cousins visiting my home in the 70s who were somewhat taken aback that we had no running water. My first job as a 9 year old was drawing water from a well with milk churn and wheelbarrow. I smile every time I see one of those ads about some little African bint walking 5 miles for a bucket of water. Oxfam never ran ads about poor Gary Cooper in Co. Waterford. The cúnts.
at least little muphalosi isn’t walking 5 miles in lashing rain barely above freezing in shorts and a jumper.
 

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