Irish War of Independence centenary

16 September 1921



The Commander of the Benicia Arsenal in San Francisco denied rumours that obsolete weapons from the arsenal had made their way to Ireland after being purchased by sympathetic Irish American republicans.
In Tom Barry's book he laments the thousands of US troops who passed through Cork on their way home from the War and how not one of them so much as dropped out to lend a hand in the fight for Irish freedom. Of course this was absurd, why on earth would they?

But this and the fact that Irish republicans are scrabbling around for obsolete weapons in San Francisco, in a country where little boys could go down to the nickel and dime store to freely purchase rifles and pistols, shows that the fearsome American support that apparently underpinned the Irish independence movement was often more of a chimera than a deciding factor (as indeed it was in the later Troubles, for all the silly talk of how it was Boston bar customers who funded the Provos' campaign).
 
18 September 1921

Maggie Ardis, age 19, was chatting to 22 year old Evelyn Blair outside number 6 Vere Street, Belfast when both women were shot and fatally wounded. They both died in the Royal Victoria Hospital later in the day. John (or Francis) Corr of 54 Vere Street was subsequently charged with their murder. Corr was acquitted at his trial as a soldier testified to being served in Corr’s shop by him at the time of the shooting.

Dev and LG were still exchanging telegrams, basically repeating the same stuff. LG has come around to meeting the Dáil representatives but only as representatives of Irish people, and not of a sovereign state.

boland.jpg

Harry Boland was guest of honour in Croke Park for the second Sunday in a row, cheering on Dublin as they defeat Kildare in the Leinster Football Final replay. The photo shows Boland shaking the hand of Joyce Conlan, the Kildare mascot.
 
In Tom Barry's book he laments the thousands of US troops who passed through Cork on their way home from the War and how not one of them so much as dropped out to lend a hand in the fight for Irish freedom. Of course this was absurd, why on earth would they?
My great uncle Michael Flynn came to Ireland from the US in 1921 and stayed until 1924 when he returned to the states. He had served in France with a US Artillery Regiment in the 32nd Division. He might have helped out a bit during the Civil War.
 
In Tom Barry's book he laments the thousands of US troops who passed through Cork on their way home from the War and how not one of them so much as dropped out to lend a hand in the fight for Irish freedom. Of course this was absurd, why on earth would they?
A large number would have been Irish emigrants.

I read somewhere that after the American Civil War ended in 1865, the RIC had been alarmed at the large numbers of Fenian war veterans who had returned to the old country for no apparent reason. Their American boots were the give away. Irish Fenian US Civil War veterans had also invaded Canada in 1866.

PS I believe the Irish-Americans had some involvement in this.
It seems to have fizzled out.
 
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19 September 1921

De Valera sent a telegram to Lloyd George, still in Scotland, saying that the two sides were unlikely to reconcile their disagreements through correspondence and that a conference was the best means to overcome their differences.

An RIC Officer taking photographs of a sports meeting at Donohill, Co. Tipperary was apprehended by local IRA men who demanded he hand over the photographic plates. The RIC man, who was perhaps tired of living, insisted photography was his hobby but surrendered the plates.

A young woman was tied to the railings of the parish church in Tullamore, Co. Offaly on display for those going to early mass. She reportedly had her mouth muffled, and a card bearing an inscription was left on her person.

Edited to add that to nobody's surprise the card attached to her had the word "Immorality" written on it. Two other young ladies suffered the same indignity around the same time, being chained to the new electric poles* near the church with similar cards attached. The events were recorded in the diary of 13 year old Patrick Wrafter.

offalyhistoryblog See the paragraph entitle A Tullamore school boy records the date in his diary

*Tullamore switched from gas lighting to electric lights on 27 September 1921.
 
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19 September 1921

De Valera sent a telegram to Lloyd George, still in Scotland, saying that the two sides were unlikely to reconcile their disagreements through correspondence and that a conference was the best means to overcome their differences.

An RIC Officer taking photographs of a sports meeting at Donohill, Co. Tipperary was apprehended by local IRA men who demanded he hand over the photographic plates. The RIC man, who was perhaps tired of living, insisted photography was his hobby but surrendered the plates.

A young woman was tied to the railings of the parish church in Tullamore, Co. Offaly on display for those going to early mass. She reportedly had her mouth muffled, and a card bearing an inscription was left on her person.
Nothing like instant justice to damn the innocent, depending on their version of innocence
 
20 September 1921

A man was found tied to railings in Borris-in-Ossory, Co. Laois with a placard saying; 'Robbers beware: Tried and found guilty by the IRA'

Eamonn de Valera, replying to an anti-partition deputation from Derry, said that the partition of Ireland 'is wrong in principle, unsound economically, and can only lead to bankruptcy and turmoil'. Presumably the British government would make the same argument about Ireland leaving the UK.
 
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With the ceasefire in place, was there a lot of local justice or did the RIC only take on the non political sensitive cases/incidents/ usual occurances
 
With the ceasefire in place, was there a lot of local justice or did the RIC only take on the non political sensitive cases/incidents/ usual occurances
I get the impression that the RIC was no longer functioning in a police role and people would have been encouraged to take their crime solving problems to the IRA.
 
I get the impression that the RIC was no longer functioning in a police role and people would have been encouraged to take their crime solving problems to the IRA.
To be fair the withdrawal of rural ric barracks was a deciding factor in the anglo war. The link posted by Bohs goes in some length to explain the legal systems that arose from that withdrawal of the kings law.
 
To be fair the withdrawal of rural ric barracks was a deciding factor in the anglo war. The link posted by Bohs goes in some length to explain the legal systems that arose from that withdrawal of the kings law.
Undoubtedly.
What were the ADRIC doing during the cease fire? Holding whist drives, Bingo nights and the local secret policeman's Ball ?
The Truce would have basically confined them to barracks I think.
 
22 September 1921

Lloyd George was still mulling over his reply to de Valera's most recent telegram. LG was taking his time and consulting with his cabinet to ensure that he could get the Irish to a conference without ceding sovereignty.

The Senate of the Northern Ireland Parliament approved Stormont Castle as the site for a new parliamentary building.

Swiss ballooninsts, Captain Paul Armbruster and Louis Ansermier were forced to land on Lambay Island off the Dublin coast. An American balloon crashed into the sea, and its occupants were rescued. The ballonists were competing in the Gordon Bennett Balloon Race. Ansermier’s account of the race is at this link.

 
23 September 1921

During rioting on Newtownards Road, Belfast, Samuel Robinson aged 53 from Madrid Street was hit and killed by an armoured car.

Private Walter Rennie, 2nd Bn, Gordon Highlanders, died in Portlaois Hospital of an accidentally inflicted gunshot wound. Rennie was 18 and from Aberdeen.

Luke Killian an IRA man in the South Roscommon Brigade died in the County Infirmary in Roscommon. Killian fell off his bike on 5th September, while returning from a funeral. He developed blood poisoning from an injury to his nose. It never ceases to amaze me how superficial injuries and minor illnesses were often fatal in the days before antibiotics.
 
Being bright lads and seeing which way the wind was blowing I imagine they were polishing up their CVs for their Palestine Police applications, or maybe the French Foreign Legion.
They were still getting paid a pound a day though and looking forward to a substantial bounty in January 1922.
 
24 September 1921

Murtagh McAstocker and John Duggan were attacked as they left St. Matthew’s Church on Bryson Street, Belfast. The attack was initially confined to stone throwing but then one man produced a revolver and shot Mcastocker, killing him instantly. Mcastocker was aged 23, from Moira Street and a member of 2nd Battalion, Belfast Brigade. Thomas Pentland, a member of the Ulster Protestant Association, was charged and acquitted of his murder.
 
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