Irish War of Independence centenary

Are they the Anti Treaty party?
Fine Gael are the descendants of the pro-Treaty side, they are the "Irish traitors" told to take down the flag (the Tricolour) in the song as they are accused by Republicans of betraying what the flag stands for. It is a very powerful and visceral song that gets to the heart of the bitterness of the Civil War.

Fine Gael of course would utterly reject the label of traitors and insist that they in fact have always been the party most loyal to the Irish state and indeed it was they who eventually declared the Republic in 1949, something that even Dev shied away from.

So for a Fine Gael politician to ask, even in the 2000s, for the Irish flag to be taken down as she didn't want it flying at her daughter's wedding might appear to some people as a little bit tone deaf.

ETA: A link to a decent version of the song with a bit of a tongue-in-cheek intro from The Dubliners

 
Last edited:
Brugha sent a highly critical letter, using strident language, to Collins over the handling of a case of a businessman called Robbie who had been banished from Ireland by the IRA on incorrect information.​
What was the motivation for him to send it? Political positioning or genuine outrage?
 
1 August 1921

A meeting of the Irish Trades Union Congress was held in Dublin. It was addressed by de Valera who thanked them for the loyal and unselfish part played by Irish Labour throughout the war.
 
What was the motivation for him to send it? Political positioning or genuine outrage?
Political positioning I think. Brugha was one of the most die-hard Republicans in the Dáil while Collins was more pragmatic and willing to compromise. The odd thing about this incident is that the Minister for Defence (Brugha) was writing to the Minister for Finance (Collins) complaining about the actions of the Army.
 
Fine Gael of course would utterly reject the label of traitors and insist that they in fact have always been the party most loyal to the Irish state

Ironically, when De Valera wrote the present Constitution in 1937, treason was defined as "making war on the state", a charge frequently levelled at Fianna Fáil.
 
Political positioning I think. Brugha was one of the most die-hard Republicans in the Dáil while Collins was more pragmatic and willing to compromise. The odd thing about this incident is that the Minister for Defence (Brugha) was writing to the Minister for Finance (Collins) complaining about the actions of the Army.
Factions within factions, aka who actually controlled/influenced which division or brigade…

As the man In control of the purse so to speak, always wise to scrutinise expenses or where money went or didn’t appear to tally.
 
Political positioning I think. Brugha was one of the most die-hard Republicans in the Dáil while Collins was more pragmatic and willing to compromise. The odd thing about this incident is that the Minister for Defence (Brugha) was writing to the Minister for Finance (Collins) complaining about the actions of the Army.
Do we know is there anything unusual about Mr Robbie compared any of the others "advised to leave"?
 
5 August 1921

Constable Thomas Kane stopped two men who were acting suspiciously on Earlswood Road in Belfast. One man, Francis Crummey, pulled a revolver and shot the policeman in the leg. As they were fleeing, Crummey accidentally shot his accomplice, Freddie Fox. Both men were arrested, with Fox dying of his injuries on August 15th. Crummey was the son of an IRA Divisional I/O named Frank Crummey, who was interned at the time. The two IRA men were trying to identify RIC DI Harrison, a suspected member of the Nixon’s RIC death squad. Fox was 19 and originally from Lisburn.

Charles Green, age 42, was fatally wounded during a robbery at his business in College Court. He died on 25th August.
 
I bought a copy of The Times today. On page 26 headlined NEW PEACE MOVE IN IRELAND From the Times August 5 1921.

It was officially announced in Dublin last evening that a meeting of Dail Eireann is being summoned for August 16. It is understood that the Irish negotiations have entered upon a new phase. Mr de Valera is inviting Sir Jmes Craig to a discussion upon Irish soil. He has further, proposed that it should be uncondiional as his recent conversations with the Prime Minister at Downing Street. It is thought possible that Sir James may refuse the invitation unless Mr de Valera is prepared to recognise the status of Northern Ireland. If he does, it will no doubt be the result of pressure exerted by some of his Belfast followers who are opposed to any concilatory action which might seem to weaken the Northern claim to complete independence of Southern Ireland.

The article goes on a bit but concludes with:

The truce is being preserved rigorously, and there seems to be no justification in fact for rumours that either side has been using it as a cloak for the preparation of future hostilities.
 
6 August 1921

Dublin Castle issued statement that all TDs would be released, except Sean McKeon, because he had been convicted of murder. De Valera said that if McKeon was kept in detention then he “cannot accept responsibility for proceeding further with the negotiations”. McKeon was released.

Edited to add; 112 out of 130 TDs have served at least one term in prison. 76 have been imprisoned twice, 41 three times, 18 four times, 8 five times, 3 seven times, and 2 eight times. 15 of them had been sentenced to death.

The IRA had taken over policing of nationalist areas in Belfast and Eoin O’Duffy wrote to the RIC Commissioner in Belfast, J F Gelston, saying the IRA patrols had been able to frustrate any behaviour which might lead to serious disturbances. The unionists were unhappy. O’Duffy also dropped in to visit Constable Kane in hospital in Belfast about this time.
 
Last edited:
8 August 1921

The trial began in Glasgow of 13 men in connection with the attempt to free Frank Carty from a prison van in May. Inspector Robert Johnston had been killed in the attack and Detective Sergeant George Stirton was wounded. The trial lasted 11 days and all 13 men were acquitted. Ironically, Carty himself was released from prison on the 8th August as part of the amnesty of TDs.

Sean McKeon was also released under the amnesty on this date.

Cadet Frederick Morrison, from Bangor Co. Down, took his own life by jumping in the Liffey at North Wall. Morrison was 23 years old and had lost an arm at Messines Ridge, serving with the MGC. He had been studying law in Dublin until Bloody Sunday prompted him to join the Auxiliaries.

Constable Thomas Ikin also took his own life in Hollywood RIC Barracks in Wicklow. He was aged 25 and from Essex.
 
A hundred years ago the citizens of Dublin would carefully stroll around their parks. I wonder if the wildlife were protected back then
BE065762-36C9-4A2A-BDF1-0835FF4D8354.jpeg
 
6 August 1921

Dublin Castle issued statement that all TDs would be released, except Sean McKeon, because he had been convicted of murder. De Valera said that if McKeon was kept in detention then he “cannot accept responsibility for proceeding further with the negotiations”. McKeon was released.

Edited to add; 112 out of 130 TDs have served at least one term in prison. 76 have been imprisoned twice, 41 three times, 18 four times, 8 five times, 3 seven times, and 2 eight times. 15 of them had been sentenced to death.

The IRA had taken over policing of nationalist areas in Belfast and Eoin O’Duffy wrote to the RIC Commissioner in Belfast, J F Gelston, saying the IRA patrols had been able to frustrate any behaviour which might lead to serious disturbances. The unionists were unhappy. O’Duffy also dropped in to visit Constable Kane in hospital in Belfast about this time.
Interesting article from century Ireland regarding imprisoned TDs etc:

 
10 August 1921

De Valera formally rejected the proposals made by Lloyd George last month. The proposals, however, have not yet been made known outside the Cabinet. In a letter to the British PM, De Valera dismissed the idea of qualified Dominion Status and stated that the only basis for settlement was an absolute separation from Britain. Partition was also rejected on the basis that the British had no right to impose it for their own interest or at the call of a section of the Irish population.

Meanwhile in London, Austen Chamberlain told the House of Commons that the policy of coercion in Ireland was leading to disappointing results and the future resolution would come from talks. This kind of cuts the ground from under Lloyd George’s threat of total war. Chamberlain went on to explain that Sean MacEoin's release was completed to keep the Irish talking.

Tom Barry, Chief IRA Liaison Officer for Munster, questioned why one TD remained in prison. Seán Hayes was still in Spike Island, and the reasons for his continued detention were unclear.

An Irish woman was reported to have been arrested in Paris after asking a policeman for his pistol so she could kill Prime Minister Lloyd George as he attended the Allied Supreme Council meeting.

Plans for a stop off in Britain by 250 members of American Legion, who were sailing to France on board the USS George Washington, were abandoned after several men flew Irish tricolours and cheered for Sinn Féin as the ship passed the Irish coast.

Cathal Brugha accused Michael Collins and Harry Boland of the misuse of money in the purchase of arms in the United States. The IRA Adjutant General wrote to Fintan Murphy asking him to look into it but not too carefully.
 
10 August 1921

De Valera formally rejected the proposals made by Lloyd George last month. The proposals, however, have not yet been made known outside the Cabinet. In a letter to the British PM, De Valera dismissed the idea of qualified Dominion Status and stated that the only basis for settlement was an absolute separation from Britain. Partition was also rejected on the basis that the British had no right to impose it for their own interest or at the call of a section of the Irish population.

Meanwhile in London, Austen Chamberlain told the House of Commons that the policy of coercion in Ireland was leading to disappointing results and the future resolution would come from talks. This kind of cuts the ground from under Lloyd George’s threat of total war. Chamberlain went on to explain that Sean MacEoin's release was completed to keep the Irish talking.

Tom Barry, Chief IRA Liaison Officer for Munster, questioned why one TD remained in prison. Seán Hayes was still in Spike Island, and the reasons for his continued detention were unclear.

An Irish woman was reported to have been arrested in Paris after asking a policeman for his pistol so she could kill Prime Minister Lloyd George as he attended the Allied Supreme Council meeting.

Plans for a stop off in Britain by 250 members of American Legion, who were sailing to France on board the USS George Washington, were abandoned after several men flew Irish tricolours and cheered for Sinn Féin as the ship passed the Irish coast.

Cathal Brugha accused Michael Collins and Harry Boland of the misuse of money in the purchase of arms in the United States. The IRA Adjutant General wrote to Fintan Murphy asking him to look into it but not too carefully.
Barry seems to have been a bit vocal during this period, again from Century Ireland:

 
Top