Irish War of Independence centenary

I already posted this in the "internet links" thread but I thought it would be appropriate here too.

A bar in Derry urges its customers to take advantage of the current very hot spell in its beer garden.

(If you are ever in Derry @par avion I'll buy you a drink here)

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20 July 1921

Auxiliary Cadet Cyrus Regnart committed suicide by shooting himself in Woodstock House, Inistioge, Co. Kilkenny. Regnart seems to have been a very interesting character. He was commissioned in the Royal Marines in 1897 and spent a long time in Naval Intelligence. He was a talented linguist and spoke Russian, Spanish, French, German and Danish. He was placed on the retired list in 1913 and seconded to MI6 where he ran a network of agents in Belgium and Holland. Recalled to the Colours in 1914, Regnart was promoted Major in 1917 and spent much of the war on a base in Scotland. He had joined the Auxiliaries in June 1921. The link below implies his work during the war and in the Auxiliaries may have been Intelligence related. There's a bit of detail at the link.


The British Cabinet agreed ‘Proposals of the British Government for an Irish Settlement'. They were qualified Dominion status for Southern Ireland with full internal control including taxation, finance, education, police, postal service, courts and land defence with restrictions on the strength of the Irish army. The south would have no navy with Britain retaining bases for the Royal Navy, rights of recruiting and an Irish contribution to British War Debt. Free trade would continue between the two countries. The south would be subject to the Crown and have to recognise the existing powers and privileges of the Parliament of Northern Ireland, which could not be abrogated except by the consent of that Parliament. The terms were sent to the Irish delegation at the Grosvenor Hotel.
 
20 July 1921

Auxiliary Cadet Cyrus Regnart committed suicide by shooting himself in Woodstock House, Inistioge, Co. Kilkenny. Regnart seems to have been a very interesting character. He was commissioned in the Royal Marines in 1897 and spent a long time in Naval Intelligence. He was a talented linguist and spoke Russian, Spanish, French, German and Danish. He was placed on the retired list in 1913 and seconded to MI6 where he ran a network of agents in Belgium and Holland. Recalled to the Colours in 1914, Regnart was promoted Major in 1917 and spent much of the war on a base in Scotland. He had joined the Auxiliaries in June 1921. The link below implies his work during the war and in the Auxiliaries may have been Intelligence related. There's a bit of detail at the link.


The British Cabinet agreed ‘Proposals of the British Government for an Irish Settlement'. They were qualified Dominion status for Southern Ireland with full internal control including taxation, finance, education, police, postal service, courts and land defence with restrictions on the strength of the Irish army. The south would have no navy with Britain retaining bases for the Royal Navy, rights of recruiting and an Irish contribution to British War Debt. Free trade would continue between the two countries. The south would be subject to the Crown and have to recognise the existing powers and privileges of the Parliament of Northern Ireland, which could not be abrogated except by the consent of that Parliament. The terms were sent to the Irish delegation at the Grosvenor Hotel.
Regnart certainly is an interesting character, it seems that he might not have been twiddling his thumbs in Scotland during the Great War but might in fact have had a hand in tapping the German cables, thus intercepting the Zimmerman Telegram and bringing the US into the war. A huge feather in his cap if this was the case.

It's odd that he would end up joining the Auxies a week or two before the Truce and then promptly shoot himself, there would appear to be a lot more to the man than can be discerned simply from his written records.
 
20 July 1921

Auxiliary Cadet Cyrus Regnart committed suicide by shooting himself

Regnart did indeed have a very interesting history. He lived the sort of twilight spook life that Childers used to write stories about.

I would bet folding money that he was not an Auxiliary cadet and that he did not shoot himself. Neither really stack up to his history.


Edit: As @Mike Barton said. Crossed in the post.
 
Ref the Capt. HJ Alston mentioned. There was a very old book in circulation when I was a young MN type snotty. Captain Alstons Seamanship. It had a short chapter on how to hang a man at sea... :) I wonder if it was Him, or a relation?
Was he in Kilkenny this day 100 years ago?

Edited to add it seems the Captain Alston who wrote the book was Alfred Henry Alston. If you're feeling flush, Amazon has two copies available for about £45 each.
 
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21 July 1921

George Walker died at his home in Eight Street, Belfast of pneumonia, aged 19. Walker was a member of the Orange Order and had been shot and wounded on 18th May in a disturbance accompanying an Orange Procession on Beverly Street. He was treated in the Royal Victoria Hospital and discharged. His death was attributed to his injury.

De Valera and Lloyd George met for the fourth, and last, time in a week. De Valera told Lloyd George he could not advise his people to accept the terms offered by Britain and went off on a rant about English misdeeds in Ireland. Lloyd George offered to send in more troops to repeat some of those misdeeds and Dev said it was one thing sending the troops and another keeping them in Ireland long-term. De Valera agreed to bring the British proposals back to Ireland and then left his copy in Lloyd George’s office, having to send someone back for them later. Later the proposals were unanimously rejected by the Irish cabinet and the next two months were taken up with exchanges of angry letters and telegrams between Lloyd George and De Valera. Both men were under some political pressure- De Valera because the Irish Republic wasn’t going to happen and Lloyd George because of the economy, trouble with the Unions and a split in the Liberal party.
 
I already posted this in the "internet links" thread but I thought it would be appropriate here too.

A bar in Derry urges its customers to take advantage of the current very hot spell in its beer garden.

(If you are ever in Derry @par avion I'll buy you a drink here)

View attachment 590141

It has been over 45 years since I was last in Derry and thats not long enough.
 
24 July 1921

Stephen Geoghegan and Peter Keenan from Dublin went to carry out a robbery on the outskirts of the city. While climbing a ladder to get in a window, Geoghegan managed to shoot himself in the stomach, and subsequently died. Geoghegan was age 26, from Bridgefoot Street and had served in the RE.

A confrontation between RIC and civilians in Limerick led to several people being injured.
 
26 July 1921

Sir Charles O’Connor, Master of the Rolls in Ireland, ruled in favour of writs of habeas corpus that had been lodged with him by lawyers for two men detained by military courts. O’Connor’s reasoning as far as I can make out was that military tribunals were unconstitutional. The judgement led to a brief face-off between the military and the civil authorities, with General Macready threatening to arrest O’Connor. In the end Macready backed down.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
Knowing the British Army, King George the first probably visited the 10th Hussars in seventeen something or the other and as he was distracted by some feller called George Washington at the time, referred to the men on parade as Privates instead of Troopers. Obviously nobody would correct the King and he didn't speak English anyway, so in honour of his visit other ranks of the 10th Hussars were called Privates instead.
Just seen this...so sorry for coming late to the party, or if somebody else has answered it. I understand that the truth is duller. Until about the 1920s The most junior rank in the cavalry was "private". A "trooper" was his horse and the OR equivalent of an officer's "charger".
 
Just seen this...so sorry for coming late to the party, or if somebody else has answered it. I understand that the truth is duller. Until about the 1920s The most junior rank in the cavalry was "private". A "trooper" was his horse and the OR equivalent of an officer's "charger".
Classic, following this trend Privates in the RLC will soon be known as Land Rovers or Stores. :)
 
21 July 1921

George Walker died at his home in Eight Street, Belfast of pneumonia, aged 19. Walker was a member of the Orange Order and had been shot and wounded on 18th May in a disturbance accompanying an Orange Procession on Beverly Street. He was treated in the Royal Victoria Hospital and discharged. His death was attributed to his injury.

De Valera and Lloyd George met for the fourth, and last, time in a week. De Valera told Lloyd George he could not advise his people to accept the terms offered by Britain and went off on a rant about English misdeeds in Ireland. Lloyd George offered to send in more troops to repeat some of those misdeeds and Dev said it was one thing sending the troops and another keeping them in Ireland long-term. De Valera agreed to bring the British proposals back to Ireland and then left his copy in Lloyd George’s office, having to send someone back for them later. Later the proposals were unanimously rejected by the Irish cabinet and the next two months were taken up with exchanges of angry letters and telegrams between Lloyd George and De Valera. Both men were under some political pressure- De Valera because the Irish Republic wasn’t going to happen and Lloyd George because of the economy, trouble with the Unions and a split in the Liberal party.
It would be interesting to see what written notes remain of the interactions between the pair of wiley statesmen.
 
Did the Boyos get Sunday off?
The problem with a Truce is that there are days when nothing happens. And local events that did take place haven't made the "big picture" history books.

This also brings us to the question of where do we end this thread. The Treaty was signed on 6th December 1921 so that's a cut-off date or we could just keep going with the Civil War rather than start a new thread.
 

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