Irish War of Independence centenary

3044605 Private George Chalmers, age 19, jumped off a lorry while on patrol in order to visit a girl he was seeing in Co. Clare. Picked up by the IRA ,he was shot dead and his body buried. He was exhumed in 2018 and reinterred in Grangegorman Cemetery, Dublin
From the link about George Chalmers:

Scottish regiments had a particularly bad reputation in the area.
 
12 June 1921

The police in Belfast called to several homes around the city at about 1 am to carry out arrests. Most men were wisely not at home but the following three men were taken away and shot dead.

Alexander McBride, age 30 originally from Ballycastle, Co. Antrim. His body was found on Ballysillan Road.

Malachy Halfpenny, age 22 from Herbert Street. Malachy was one of six brothers who served in the army in WW1, one of whom was killed and all of whom were wounded. His body was found on Ligoniel Road

William Kerr, age 26 from Old Lodge Road. His body was found on Springfield Road at 6.30 am.

Rioting, accompanied by gunfire, continued in the evening. Special Constable Michael Sturdy from Castlederg, Co. Tyrone, was hit by gunfire on Garmoyle Street and died shortly afterwards in the Royal Victoria Hospital. In retaliation the police shot two men in their homes nearby.

Patrick Milligan was shot dead in the back yard of his home. He was 24, married with one child.

Joseph Millar, aged 25 and also married with one child, was shout outside his home on Coates Street. He died at 2.15 am on June 13th.

Hugh Jenkins, a 19 year old Protestant was shot by rioters on Kashmir Road.

A 78 year old Protestant retired clergyman was killed during the burning of his home, Brackley House, at Bawnboy, Co. Cavan. John Finlay was probably killed by a blow to the head from an iron bar one of the IRA men was carrying. The staff of the house knew the men who killed Finlay and eight of them were arrested but never tried. All were released in early 1922.

Petty Officer William Kennington was killed in an attack on Teelin Coastguard Station, Co. Donegal. Kennington was 40 years of age and from Devon.

Head Constable James McElhill was shot and fatally wounded as he made his way to Mass in Kilbeggan, Co. Westmeath. McElhill was from Castlederg, Co. Tyrone, aged 53 and had joined the RIC in 1888.

Thomas Rush, a 29 year old US Army veteran, was shot dead by a patrol of the Leicestershire Regiment near Castlerea, Co. Roscommon. The patrol surprised a group of men drilling in a field who fled when challenged. Rush’s death was taken up by the US Consul at the time.

Two Black and Tan recruits who went for a drink in Ryan’s pub in Parkgate Street, Dublin were taken by the IRA and shot dead on Rainsford Street.

Michael Brennan, age 27 from Durham, was ex Royal Navy.

John Smith was 25 years old. Both men had joined the RIC on 20th May.

5373689 Lance Corporal Mark Hudson of the Ox & Bucks LI was shot dead by a sentry in Tulla RIC barracks, Co. Clare while on cycle patrol. Hudson was 24 and from London.
1dan breen.jpg
Edited to add that Dan Breen took a day off from being a psychopath to get married. The lucky woman was Bridget Malone from Dublin and the nuptials took place near New Inn, Co. Tipperary.
 
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A 78 year old Protestant retired clergyman was killed during the burning of his home, Brackley House, at Bawnboy, Co. Cavan. John Finlay was probably killed by a blow to the head from an iron bar one of the IRA men was carrying. The staff of the house knew the men who killed Finlay and eight of them were arrested but never tried. All were released in early 1922.

 
Derry City play in the League of Ireland because they weren't allowed to play in the Irish League as the other teams wouldn't travel to the Brandywell. It seems it was perfectly acceptable to demand that Derry play in Windsor Park or the Oval or any other ground in staunch loyalist areas but Linfield or Glentoran couldn't be expected to travel to Derry.

Of course having booted out Belfast Celtic 20 years before, the Irish League had form when it came to "Kefflik" teams playing football in their wee league.

Ballymena’s bus was attacked outside the Brandywell - hence the League decision.
That never happened to the Derry City bus at an away game.
 
Ballymena’s bus was attacked outside the Brandywell - hence the League decision.
That never happened to the Derry City bus at an away game.
In 1972, one bus was attacked. Derry were then banned forever.

Are you seriously suggesting that in all the years of football being played in Northern Ireland no other bus or fans (or teams for that matter Belfast Celtic's keeper had his legs broken, and Celtic got banned!) was ever attacked anywhere? Were those teams banned for life? No, just Derry then, oh and Belfast Celtic (there's a link there, if only I could put my finger on it).

Just for the record I remember having to be escorted by a phalanx of RUC men in Land Rovers as we tried to get a team of schoolboys out of Windsor Park in 1983, the baying mob that showed up to attack when the word went out that there was a bunch of Fenian weeans from Derry was quite astonishing.

I am sure we weren't the only team to have suffered that fate (the large presence of RUC in riot gear when we showed up would indicate that the local peelers knew what was likely to happen) in all the years at Windsor Park, but strangely the IFA never felt the need to ban anyone, least of all Linfield.

Anyway, back to the subject in hand.
 
13 June 1921

John Cosgrave, a member of Sinn Féin from Camlough, Co. Armagh, was taken from his home and shot dead. Depending on who you read he was killed by the Special Constabulary, the IRA or the Ancient Order of Hibernians.

Denis Sadleir, a member of 5th Bn, 3rd Tipperary Bde, was accidentally killed during weapons cleaning. His body was buried secretly until the Truce and then re-interred in Drangan.

Michael Driscoll was fired on as he fled an Essex Regiment patrol near Kinsale, Co. Cork. Driscoll’s body was found next day with a bullet wound to the leg. He was 55, and an ex-soldier.

Rioting and gunfire continued in Belfast.

William Frazer, aged 12, was shot dead by a sniper on Ashmore Street.

Hugh McAree, went to assist Frazer and was also shot and killed. McAree was a 30 year old, ex-serviceman.

Joseph Blackburn (39), was hit by gunfire coming from North Queen Street. He died on June 23rd.

Smuts met King George V and suggested a peace appeal when the King opened the Northern Ireland parliament on June 22nd.
 
13 June 1921

John Cosgrave, a member of Sinn Féin from Camlough, Co. Armagh, was taken from his home and shot dead. Depending on who you read he was killed by the Special Constabulary, the IRA or the Ancient Order of Hibernians.

Denis Sadleir, a member of 5th Bn, 3rd Tipperary Bde, was accidentally killed during weapons cleaning. His body was buried secretly until the Truce and then re-interred in Drangan.

Michael Driscoll was fired on as he fled an Essex Regiment patrol near Kinsale, Co. Cork. Driscoll’s body was found next day with a bullet wound to the leg. He was 55, and an ex-soldier.

Rioting and gunfire continued in Belfast.

William Frazer, aged 12, was shot dead by a sniper on Ashmore Street.

Hugh McAree, went to assist Frazer and was also shot and killed. McAree was a 30 year old, ex-serviceman.

Joseph Blackburn (39), was hit by gunfire coming from North Queen Street. He died on June 23rd.

Smuts met King George V and suggested a peace appeal when the King opened the Northern Ireland parliament on June 22nd.
Cosgrave wasn't a popular chap then I take it.
 
14 June 1921

Special Constables came under fire on the Falls Road, Belfast at about 1 pm. Kathleen Collins, age 18 was sitting in her home in Cupar Street, knitting with her sisters when she was struck by a stray round. She died later that evening in hospital.

Thomas Mallon, 51, died in hospital in Belfast of injuries received on 11th June.

William Gorman, age 13, died in hospital in Dublin having been wounded on 8th June in an IRA grenade attack on an RIC lorry in Great Brunswick Street.

George Wallis, a process server from Cashel, Co. Tipperary was shot dead on the roadside as he went about his business. Wallis was a Protestant, from Bandon, Co. Cork and a loyalist. He was suspected of being an informer and was shot by Paddy Keane whom you’ll recall as having been arrested back in March after the killing of a Black and Tan in Cashel. Keane survived his arrest and subsequently escaped from the military barracks in Cahir.

Not far from the scene of Wallis’s death, a farmer named Francis Boyle was also shot as an informer near Fethard, Co. Tipperary. Boyle was also a Protestant and was also the tenant on a farm from which a man had been evicted 27 years previously. In April Robert Stone had been shot in the same area. Stone’s father, like Boyle, was a tenant on a disputed farm. Robert Stone and George Wallis also had in common the fact that they were both killed by Paddy Keane.

James Kane, a retire policeman working as a fisheries inspector in Listowel, Co. Kerry, was shot as a spy. Kane had served in the RIC from 1877 to 1910. A witness statement made by Kane to the police had allegedly been captured by the IRA. Kane’s brother John was a Chief Inspector in Scotland Yard who had investigated the theft of the Irish Crown Jewels in 1907.

John Donoghue, ex Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was shot as an informer in Rathoath, Co. Meath. Donoghue was wounded in the 1916 Rising and twice more in France. Discharged from the army in March 1921, he had secured a job in Guinness Brewery.

Sean MacEoin, O/C Longford Brigade was charged before a court martial in Dublin with the murder of RIC DI McGrath on the 7th Jan 1921. Auxiliaries gave evidence of his good treatment of wounded prisoners after the Clonfin ambush on 2nd February and Mrs McGrath, the wife of the dead RIC man asked that he not be executed. MacEoin was however sentenced to be hanged. He was saved from the gallows by the Truce.

Smuts drafted a speech for the King to deliver at the opening of the Belfast parliament.
 
15 June 1921

An ambush by the East Clare Bde on a train carrying troops of the Royal Scots at Cratloe, Co. Clare went wrong resulting in the deaths of two IRA men and the wounding and capture of another four. The train drove through the ambush and then once it reached Cratloe Station, Lieutenant Gordon ordered all civilians off and reversed back to the ambush site. The IRA ambush party, in the act of withdrawing, were taken by surprise. The dead were

Michael Gleeson, 22, a Lieutenant in the Caherdavin Company. Gleeson almost escaped but went back to help a wounded man, Christy McCarthy and was then hit and killed.

Christy McCarthy, wounded as he withdrew, was shot dead while being assisted by Gleeson. He was 22 and from Miltown Malbay.

Robert Healy, a 24 year old deserter from the Royal Irish Regiment, was abducted from his home in Ballingarry, Co. Tipperary on 10th June and shot dead on 15th June.

3514304 Private Frank Roughley, Manchester Regiment, disappeared from Ballincollig Barracks. His death was accepted for official purposes as June 15th. There are no details of his death other than that.

Patrick Jordan an IRA man from Castlebar, Co. Mayo died of an infected head wound in King George V Hospital in Dublin. Jordan was wounded and captured at the Kilmeena Ambush on 19th May.
 
16 June 1921

The Rathcoole Ambush took place in Co. Cork. It seems to have been ambitious and well organised, resulting in the deaths of two Auxiliaries with nine others sustaining injuries.

Rathcoole Ambush

The dead were;

Cadet William Boyd, aged 21 from Sussex. He served in the Royal Sussex Regiment and joined the ADRIC on 18th October 1920.

Off topic but Boyd’s father’s story is told here;


Cadet Frederick Shorter, aged 21 from Middlesex. He joined the ADRIC on 30th November 1920.

Thomas Fleming, Brigade Engineer, Kerry No 2 Bde, was killed during training with a mine near Castleisland, Co. Kerry. Twelve men were wounded in the explosion.

About 300 men of the Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment had landed at Kingstown, having travelled from Silesia. While travelling by train to Kingsbridge, they were fired on by the IRA resulting in the death of 6336107 Private William Saunders. Saunders was 20 years old and from London.

District Inspector Cyril Mason died in Wexford Infirmary. The previous evening he had accidentally shot himself while on patrol. Mason was 25 from Cheshire. He had enlisted in the Liverpool Scottish in 1914 and served in France before being commissioned in the Ox & Bucks LI. Mason joined the RIC on demobilisation in February 1921.
 
In 1972, one bus was attacked. Derry were then banned forever.

Are you seriously suggesting that in all the years of football being played in Northern Ireland no other bus or fans (or teams for that matter Belfast Celtic's keeper had his legs broken, and Celtic got banned!) was ever attacked anywhere? Were those teams banned for life? No, just Derry then, oh and Belfast Celtic (there's a link there, if only I could put my finger on it).

Just for the record I remember having to be escorted by a phalanx of RUC men in Land Rovers as we tried to get a team of schoolboys out of Windsor Park in 1983, the baying mob that showed up to attack when the word went out that there was a bunch of Fenian weeans from Derry was quite astonishing.

I am sure we weren't the only team to have suffered that fate (the large presence of RUC in riot gear when we showed up would indicate that the local peelers knew what was likely to happen) in all the years at Windsor Park, but strangely the IFA never felt the need to ban anyone, least of all Linfield.

Anyway, back to the subject in hand.

You asked, I answered.
I look forward to a time when your further response does not involve whataboutery.
 
17 June 1921

RIC Constable William Campbell was shot dead outside Dundalk, Co. Louth as he was out cycling. Campbell had his revolver to hand and though wounded, fired off six shots before his killers finished him off. Constable Campbell was 21 years old, from Dumbarton, Scotland, and had six months’ service in the RIC.

Philip Dunne, a 35 year old agricultural labourer, was shot and fatally wounded at Kilmeague, Co. Kildare. The Dunne’s home had been visited by a group of armed men on the night of the 14th though Philip managed to escape on that occasion. Margaret Dunne, Philip’s 70 year old mother recognised all the men involved. On the evening of the 16th June the raiders returned, firing a shot through the kitchen window. Dunne chased the gang with a slash hook, causing some of them to leg it. In the process, he and his mother were wounded. Philip died on the evening of the 17th. His mother appears to have survived. Six members of the IRA’s Athgarvan company- Daniel Rigney, Michael Dunne, Charlie Dunny, Joe Ward, Martin Heavey and Laurence Flood, were subsequently arrested. The killing of Philip Dunne didn’t have a political motive and was put down to a local dispute.

Patrick D’Arcy, a 27 year old schoolteacher, was shot as a spy at Doonbeg, Co. Clare. Two of his brothers were in the IRA and one had already died while escaping from the police in January 1920. Suspicion was directed at Patrick because he frequented a pub in which the police drank. An investigation by Army Intelligence in 1945 appears to have concluded D’Arcy was indeed innocent.

Patrick O’Connell, a 42 year old ex-serviceman was abducted by the IRA near Tullamore, Co. Offaly. His body was found on 19th June.

Thomas Healy was part of an IRA ambush party surprised by an RIC patrol near Sixmilebridge, Co. Clare. Most of the ambushers were untrained and inexperienced so Healy and another man covered their withdrawal. All escaped but Healy subsequently collapsed and died of heart failure. Healy was 23, and from Abbeydorney, Co. Kerry. He had joined the RIC in 1916 and resigned in August 1920 before joining the IRA.

The IRA attempted to burn Castletown Mount near Dundalk, presumably to stop its being used by the military or police.
 

JCC

LE

Wreath Laying & Plaque unveiling at Dowdallshill Cemetery, Dundalk, Co. Louth​

From: The HARP Society​

Attached are photographs of the wreath and plaque
which are to be layed and unveiled on 17 June 2021
at 1pm by the HARP Society at the hitherto unmarked
grave of RIC Constable William Campbell on the
centenary of his death.
 

Attachments

  • HARP Plaque - William Campbell.jpg
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  • HARP Wreath.jpg
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Wreath Laying & Plaque unveiling at Dowdallshill Cemetery, Dundalk, Co. Louth​

From: The HARP Society​

Attached are photographs of the wreath and plaque
which are to be layed and unveiled on 17 June 2021
at 1pm by the HARP Society at the hitherto unmarked
grave of RIC Constable William Campbell on the
centenary of his death.
Good to see.
 
How does this go down with the Sinn Fein/TAL nut cases?
Depends on the nutcase and who's doing the commemoration. A year ago FG proposed a commemoration for the RIC and got a kicking for wanting to commemorate Black and Tans and Auxiliaries. Low key commemorations don't bother them I think.
 
For readers of this thread, a free virtual talk from the National Army Museum.


With the Armistice of November 1918, the hostilities that had raged in Europe and across the globe for more than four years came to an end and the ‘war to end all wars’ was over. Yet within just a few months, a conflict of steadily increasing violence had broken out across the Irish Sea.


By the summer of 1920, the forces of the British Crown and the Irish Republican Army were locked in a full-scale guerrilla war and dozens of combatants and civilians were being killed each week. The violence finally ended when a truce was concluded in July 1921.


The Irish War of Independence is seen by many in Ireland as a dramatic, nation-making event, which ultimately led to sovereignty for most of the island. It holds a major place in the popular imagination and has been commemorated with enthusiasm during the recent centenaries. In Britain, by contrast, the war has no place in popular culture, its dead are not remembered, and the centenaries of its key milestones have received hardly any media attention.
 
Depends on the nutcase and who's doing the commemoration. A year ago FG proposed a commemoration for the RIC and got a kicking for wanting to commemorate Black and Tans and Auxiliaries. Low key commemorations don't bother them I think.
Who was it that kicked off about the Boys Brigade parade a few years back?
 

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