Irish War of Independence centenary

12 April 1921

James McGlynn from Drumshanbo, Co. Leitrim was found shot in the stomach and dying on a street in the town. Nearby was a shotgun. At 3 am the sentry in the RIC barracks reported shots being fired. A patrol, sent out to investigate, found McGlynn.
Do you know anymore about the background to this Gary. Did the deceased have any republican background? Was it a firearms accident? What is your opinion.
 
I think this is it a bit of a hammering for the Carlow boys
That's on 18th April. I couldn't find any mention of an incident on the 9th April. Maybe the dates have been mixed up somewhere.

Do you know anymore about the background to this Gary. Did the deceased have any republican background? Was it a firearms accident? What is your opinion.
The internet says he was IRA, enforcing the 'Belfast Boycott' and was shot accidentally with his own shotgun. I don't know what that was about; Belfast wasn't in Leitrim the last time I checked.

"Vol. James McGlynn dies in Drumshanbo; A century ago on Monday night 12 April 1921, Volunteer James McGlynn lost his life during the Tan War on the streets of Drumshanbo. A native of the townland of Shancurry (Corderay) he was just 22 years old and worked as a shop assistant. Darkness had fallen on that Monday night and James was killed accidentally by his own shotgun when attempting to enforce what was known as the “Belfast Boycott” of premises. His dead body lay on the street for a considerable time until he was found. Even though it was an accident, his death did little to defuse what was by now a very tense atmosphere throughout Leitrim. James McGlynn was the 12th person to die in Leitrim during the War of Independence."
 
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13 April 1921

Five RIC men were attacked as they left James Power’s pub in Fedamore, Co. Limerick. Three of the policemen were wounded, with Constable George Rogers being left on the street where he was finished off by the attackers. Dick Mulcahy was apparently critical of the the ambush and asked “why the whole patrol should not have been got?” Constable Rodgers, age 25, was from London and had joined the RIC in February 1920.

William Kenefick died in Cork of wounds received when the IRA attacked a police patrol on Washington Street. Kenefick was 48 and was one of five bystanders who were injured.

Another Cork man to die of injuries was Constable Patrick Neary, who had been accidentally shot on 1st April. Near was 34 and had despite the fact that he had joined the RIC in 1906, is described on his death certificate as being in C Coy, Auxiliary Division in Portobello Barracks.

William Moran, a 65 year old ex-serviceman, was shot dead near his home in Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. The IRA killed him for spying.

A bomb exploded in Springfield Road police barracks in Belfast causing no casualties.

The ASU of the 7th Battalion, Kilkenny Brigade ambushed two Auxiliary lorries at Moonarch near Callan, Co. Kilkenny. No fatalities.
 
That's on 18th April. I couldn't find any mention of an incident on the 9th April. Maybe the dates have been mixed up somewhere.
Quite likely.
The internet says he was IRA, enforcing the 'Belfast Boycott' and was shot accidentally with his own shotgun. I don't know what that was about; Belfast wasn't in Leitrim the last time I checked.
TDOTIR says he was putting up notices about the boycott.
 
Do you know anymore about the background to this Gary. Did the deceased have any republican background? Was it a firearms accident? What is your opinion.
McGlynn was in the IRA and appears to have been shot accidentally, whether by himself or a comrade.
 
That's on 18th April. I couldn't find any mention of an incident on the 9th April. Maybe the dates have been mixed up somewhere.


The internet says he was IRA, enforcing the 'Belfast Boycott' and was shot accidentally with his own shotgun. I don't know what that was about; Belfast wasn't in Leitrim the last time I checked.
The Belfast boycott was used against Belfast businesses as punishment for the expulsion of Catholic workers from their jobs in the shipyards and other industrial employers in that city. Obviously you couldn't impose the boycott in Belfast itself or indeed in much of Ulster or on goods leaving Belfast for Great Britain but you could boycott Belfast goods being sent to the rest of Ireland.

Trains were stopped and searched and any goods produced by embargoed Belfast manufacturers were taken out and burned, these would be textiles, food and drinks products, publications and the like. Commercial travellers staying at hotels would be warned off, shops selling proscribed goods would also be warned and later ransacked.

There was a mixed feeling among the IRA about this, many felt that something had to be done to support vulnerable Nationalists in the North and the big Unionist-leaning industrial employers in Belfast and environs who had funded and supported resistance to Home Rule didn't elicit much sympathy among mainly rural Southern Republicans.

However, it was a nakedly "partitionist" move, indeed verging on sectarian, and thus counter-productive to the ideals of Irish Republicanism. Furthermore "imposing the Belfast boycott" could be seen as an easy way out for nervous IRA units unwilling to take on some serious opposition and could lead to a bit of thuggery and pocket-filling by individuals.
 
Another Cork man to die of injuries was Constable Patrick Neary, who had been accidentally shot on 1st April. Near was 34 and had despite the fact that he had joined the RIC in 1906, is described on his death certificate as being in C Coy, Auxiliary Division in Portobello Barracks.
C Company is shown as based in Macroom Castle Co Cork according to Enest McCall's book The Auxiliares TUDOR'S TOUGHS. There is no trace of him in the nominal role for the company including the Veterans and Drivers Division attached to the Company.
 
14 April 1921

Sir Arthur Vicars was shot dead at his home in Kilmora House, Listowel, Co. Kerry. The house was then burned. There are a couple of different accounts of the circumstances but most likely Vicars was simply taken from his house at 10.15 am and executed. The IRA claimed he was a spy but I’m going to take a shot in the dark here and say that Sir Arthur may have been a loyalist.

Vicars was aged 57 and originally from Warwickshire. He had been Ulster King of Arms, a sinecure position in Dublin Castle, from 1893 to 1908 when he was dismissed following the theft of the Irish Crown Jewels the previous year.


1415170 Gunner Alexander Morrison, 19th Battery, RGA, was shot dead by Lance Bombardier S.E. Ince at Baldonnel Aerodrome in a dispute over a woman. Morrison was aged 20 and from Edinburgh. Ince attempted to kill himself but survived. He was court-martialled for murder and sentenced to death, the sentence being later commuted to life imprisonment.

Thomas Walker, a 72 year old man from Sligo was shot as a spy. Walker was a Civil Bills officer and a Protestant who had previously received a warning about passing information to the police.

Michael Byrne, a 37 year old cattle dealer was shot dead near Mountrath, Co. Laois. The motive was simple robbery.

General Macready, GOC in Ireland, issued a proclamation saying the jurisdiction of Courts of Justice in the Martial Law area was suspended. This was in response to the appealing of court martial decisions to the civil courts and the ensuing delays. Hamar Greenwood was somewhat put out as he was not consulted on the matter. That’s the problem with imposing Martial Law, Hamar, the military tends to take it literally and do what they want.
 
For the quick witted amongst ye, prior to the flag lowering ceremony at Collins barracks, the British army had over four divisions of infantry on active service. With aerial support to convey messages when the telegraph or telephone were monitored by those deemed as rebels/traitors/or simply narks


So anyone wish to guestimate the number of troops able to patrol stand sentry or engage those nefarious ambushers




One other wee point worth remembering


yes it’s wiki however it’s a point worth remembering it comes to American interest in a purely empire affair. Those stationed would have witnessed the local feelings for n against the British
 
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For the quick witted amongst ye, prior to the flag lowering ceremony at Collins barracks, the British army had over four divisions of infantry on active service. With aerial support to convey messages when the telegraph or telephone were monitored by those deemed as rebels/traitors/or simply narks


So anyone wish to guestimate the number of troops able to patrol stand sentry or engage those nefarious ambushers




One other wee point worth remembering


yes it’s wiki however it’s a point worth remembering it comes to American interest in a purely empire affair. Those stationed would have witnessed the local feelings for n against the British
As you drive along the pleasant road from Derry to Moville along Lough Foyle somewhere around Quigley's Point you can see (or you could see a decade or so ago) a line of pilings reaching out to the water, like an old pier that has long since fallen into disuse, follow it back across the road up a field and you could see a simple but solid red-brick construction sitting in a field.

It was something I passed many times without ever paying it the slightest bit of attention until one day I was told by a local it was the remains of a WWI US seaplane base, something I had never heard of and could scarcely imagine Yanks being there, especially at that time. I am not sure I was terribly convinced that it wasn't a bit of a rural myth.

Thank you for confirming that I was not subject to a wind up and that US Naval Station Lough Foyle actually existed.

1618536311053.png
 
15 April 1921

DI John McKinnon, O/C H Company of the Auxiliaries, was killed on the third green of Tralee golf course in Co. Kerry by a four-man IRA team including Con Healy from Tralee. McKinnon (TDOTIR spells his name MacKinnon) was playing golf with DI Ballantyne who was wounded by a volley of shotgun fire but escaped in McKinnon’s car. McKinnon was aged 31 and from Dumbarton, Scotland. He had gone through Sandhurst and had served in the Canadian army as an enlisted man, earning the DCM and MM before being commissioned and earning an MC and attaining the rank of Major. Judge Cusack awarded his widow Agnes £9,500 compensation in June, noting that it wasn’t a bad dowry for the next fellow. Con Healy who fired the shot that killed McKinnon, was also an ex-serviceman.

There were several reprisals for McKinnon’s death including the killing of Volunteer Jack Reidy in Ballymacelligott that afternoon. Two lorry loads of police were en route presumably to burn the creamery when they spotted Reidy and another man running away. Reidy aged 30 from Ballymacelligott was hit and died, the other man got away.

Constable Wilfred Jones was shot dead while out walking with a female friend in Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim. Wilfred, aged 35 had joined the RIC the previous November and had the hots for Margaret Sadleir, who worked in the local post office. The IRA ambushed the happy couple at about 9 pm, wounding Margaret and killing Jones, who was from London.

As the men in the local RIC barracks prepared to go out on the hunt for his killers Constable Thomas Mugan was shot and fatally wounded by another policeman. Mugan died in King George V Hospital in Dublin on 17th April.

Some detail about the killings here

Formation of First Southern Division IRA

Michael Kennedy, a 38 year old farmer and a miller from Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford was shot dead during a robbery at his home.

Captain King and two fellow Auxiliaries were acquitted at a court martial of the murder of two IRA prisoners on 9th February 1921.
 
As you drive along the pleasant road from Derry to Moville along Lough Foyle somewhere around Quigley's Point you can see (or you could see a decade or so ago) a line of pilings reaching out to the water, like an old pier that has long since fallen into disuse, follow it back across the road up a field and you could see a simple but solid red-brick construction sitting in a field.

It was something I passed many times without ever paying it the slightest bit of attention until one day I was told by a local it was the remains of a WWI US seaplane base, something I had never heard of and could scarcely imagine Yanks being there, especially at that time. I am not sure I was terribly convinced that it wasn't a bit of a rural myth.

Thank you for confirming that I was not subject to a wind up and that US Naval Station Lough Foyle actually existed.

View attachment 565612
There was US Naval airbase in Aghada, Co. Cork and another in Wexford as well.
 
16 April 1921

Robert Stone aged 18 was shot dead at 7.30 am as he and his brother George let their father’s farm animals out for the day. The official reason was the Stones were informers. In reality the family had taken over a farm from which the original owners had been evicted. The farm was at Killusty, Co. Tipperary. The family moved into the military barracks in Fethard and their farm was then burned by the IRA.

Patrick O’Neill from Omagh, Co. Tyrone, formerly a Captain in the Royal Fusiliers received a visit at his lodgings from an assassination squad of the Dublin Bde ASU. His landlady said he was out but O’Neill was seen peering through a window and was shot and fatally wounded. He died in King George V Military Hospital.

At 10.00pm, IRA men from the Mid-Clare Brigade attacked a group of off-duty British soldiers and police in Shaughnessys pub in Market Street in Ennis. A bomb was thrown into the pub, killing Sergeant Sidney Rew of the Royal Scots and wounding Constable Venderburgh, Kate Shaughnessy and Mary Anne Danagher. In retaliation, a shop, a house and the Old Ground Hotel inEnnis were burned. The IRA burned down the home of local loyalists, the Mills family.

Harry Moscrop, A Black and Tan with two months’ service commited suicide in Pallasgreen Barracks, Co. Limerick after being found with property stolen during a raid on a house.

Major Geoffrey Compton-Smith, 2nd Bn, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, was captured by the IRA led by Frank Busteed, while on a train in Blarney, Co. Cork. He was taken to Meenachoney near Donoughmore and held as a hostage for four IRA men due to executed.

RIC Constables Moore and Davis were ambushed when on patrol in Bridge Street in Ballina, Co. Mayo. They survived but were seriously injured. In retaliation, the RIC wrecked sixteen of the town’s shops and businesses.
 
17 April 1921

Constable Thomas Mugan died in King George V Hospital in Dublin, He had been wounded in Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim on 15th April after the killing of Constable Wilfred Jones. As they prepared to leave barracks, Jones friend, Constable Young became agitated and while Sergeant Carey was attempting to disarm him, Young’s weapon went off wounding Mugan. Constablr mugan was aged 23, from Castlebar, Co. Mayo and he had joined the RIC in 1916.

Constable William Duncan was accidentally shot dead in Dungarvan RIC Barracks in Co. Waterford while fooling around with a weapon. He was 20 years old and from Scotland.

Kate Carroll, age 36, from Scotstown, Co. Monaghan was taken from her house and shot dead as an informer by the IRA. Kate seems to have made a living as a Poteen maker and various reasons are given for her killing, including grassing up other moonshiners.

Sergeant William Hughes was having a drink in the bar of the Shannon View Hotel in Castle Connell, Co. Limerick with Constable Taylor, Morrison and Talbot when a group of armed men entered the premises and ordered everyone to put their hands up. Assuming they were IRA, Constable Talbot drew his revolver and opened fire. The intruders, who were actually Auxiliaries in civilian clothing, withdrew and began to fire into the bar. In the course of the shoot out Sergeant Hughes, Auxiliary Cadet Donald Pringle and hotel proprietor Denis O’Donovan were fatally wounded.

Sergeant William Hughes was 45 and from Co. Clare. Married with six children he had joined the RIC in 1896.

Cadet Donald Pringle was aged 28 and formerly a Lieutenant in the East Lancs. He had six months service in the Auxiliaries.

Denis O’Donovan was aged 46, married with four children and originally from Skibbereen, Co. Cork.
 
18 April 1921

Lieutenant J. E. Grundy was the commander of a mixed British Army/RIC patrol near Borris, Co. Carlow. Driving along in two Crossley tenders, Grundy spotted a group of men drilling in a field about 1 pm. The patrol stopped and opened fire on the men, killing four and capturing six.

Michael Fay, aged 22 and formerly of the RASC, was shot dead in the field. He was a member of the Carlow Bde ASU.

Brothers James and Peter Farrell were IRA members though not in the ASU. They were apparently working in the fields sowing corn when they spotted the patrol and went to warm the ASU men.

James Farrell was aged 22. Peter Farrell was 20.

Michael Ryan, a 62 year old farmer was pumping water in his yard when he was hit by a stray shot.
 
17 April 1921

Constable Thomas Mugan died in King George V Hospital in Dublin, He had been wounded in Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim on 15th April after the killing of Constable Wilfred Jones. As they prepared to leave barracks, Jones friend, Constable Young became agitated and while Sergeant Carey was attempting to disarm him, Young’s weapon went off wounding Mugan. Constablr mugan was aged 23, from Castlebar, Co. Mayo and he had joined the RIC in 1916.

Constable William Duncan was accidentally shot dead in Dungarvan RIC Barracks in Co. Waterford while fooling around with a weapon. He was 20 years old and from Scotland.

Kate Carroll, age 36, from Scotstown, Co. Monaghan was taken from her house and shot dead as an informer by the IRA. Kate seems to have made a living as a Poteen maker and various reasons are given for her killing, including grassing up other moonshiners.

Sergeant William Hughes was having a drink in the bar of the Shannon View Hotel in Castle Connell, Co. Limerick with Constable Taylor, Morrison and Talbot when a group of armed men entered the premises and ordered everyone to put their hands up. Assuming they were IRA, Constable Talbot drew his revolver and opened fire. The intruders, who were actually Auxiliaries in civilian clothing, withdrew and began to fire into the bar. In the course of the shoot out Sergeant Hughes, Auxiliary Cadet Donald Pringle and hotel proprietor Denis O’Donovan were fatally wounded.

Sergeant William Hughes was 45 and from Co. Clare. Married with six children he had joined the RIC in 1896.

Cadet Donald Pringle was aged 28 and formerly a Lieutenant in the East Lancs. He had six months service in the Auxiliaries.

Denis O’Donovan was aged 46, married with four children and originally from Skibbereen, Co. Cork.
Was the Castle Connell incident the one that we had photos of the aftermath of way back 100 pages or so ago? The attached caption stated that the hotel had been shot up by a Lewis gun, thus indicating that it might not have been an IRA attack.
 
19 April 1921

Lieutenant S. F. McKay led a patrol of the Leicestershire Regiment and RIC on a house near Loughglynn Wood, Co. Roscommon. Four men of the ASU, South Roscommon Bde, who were staying in the house, made a run for it but were captured after a brief fight. John Bergin and Stephen McDermott were shot by the military while Matt Kilcawley (or Joe Satchwell depending on your source) and Toby Scally were left alive. Alternatively the two dead men succumbed to wounds received in the shooting.

John Bergin was aged 23 and from Nenagh, Co. Tipperary.

Stephen McDermott, aged 19 was from Castlerea, Co. Roscommon.

A British soldier in the turret of a Rolls Royce armoured car outside the RIC barracks in Mullinavat, Co. Kilkenny fired a burst from the machine gun. James Hoban who was standing about 100 yards down the street with his uncle and brother, was hit in the thigh and died of his wounds at 7 pm in the City Infirmary in Waterford. Private McCulla, was court-martialled and found not guilty as the shooting was considered an accident.

Two RIC men who were unarmed and in civilian clothes, were taken from a train at Ballisodare Station in Co. Sligo by eight to ten IRA men who had taken over the train. The two policemen were interrogated and then shot dead. Half a dozen soldiers on the train were disarmed and released.

The dead policemen were

Constable Thomas Kelly, aged 37, married with two children. Kelly had joined the RIC in 1908. He was from Louisburgh, Co. Mayo.

Constable James Hetherington, aged 31 from Fivemiletown, Co. Tyrone. He joined the RIC on 2nd June 1914.

On April 18th, three members of the Fingal Bn followed Sergeant Stephen Kirwan into O’Connor’s Pub in Ballyboghil, Co. Dublin. In an exchange of shots Kirwan was fatally wounded as was Volunteer Peter White.

Stephen Kirwan was 44 years old, married with four children. He was originally from Co. Wexford and had joined the RIC in 1898.

Peter White was 32 and had at one stage been in the British Army. He was also suspected of having killed a policeman in Balbriggan.

Tadgh O'Sullivan of 2nd Bn, Cork No. 1 Brigade was cornered by a military patrol in Cork City and shot dead. O’Sullivan was from Rathmore, Co. Kerry and was 28 years old.
 
Was the Castle Connell incident the one that we had photos of the aftermath of way back 100 pages or so ago? The attached caption stated that the hotel had been shot up by a Lewis gun, thus indicating that it might not have been an IRA attack.
I would say so.
 

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