Irish War of Independence centenary

True; four of the five Fairey Battles were shot down, it was withdrawn from frontline service before the end of 1940. The raid was led by Flying Officer Garland, who'd been born in County Wicklow. His three brothers were also killed in WW2 whilst serving in the RAF.
My grandfather (mad Limerick bastard) had a Battle shot from under him the day before.
 
An interesting article from RTE on ex-servicemen living in Ireland during the War of Independence:

How Great War Veterans helped the Irish Revolution | Century Ireland
Good find @bohs_man
"military savoir-faire" no doubt helped tilt the war in their favour, also the "bitter jealousy" shows that those in charge were personally not professionally reluctant to trust trained sojers. I wonder if the irish guards officer cut the household shite out when instructing the Tipperary South brigade.
 
An interesting article from RTE on ex-servicemen living in Ireland during the War of Independence:

How Great War Veterans helped the Irish Revolution | Century Ireland
Good find @bohs_man
"military savoir-faire" no doubt helped tilt the war in their favour, also the "bitter jealousy" shows that those in charge were personally not professionally reluctant to trust trained sojers. I wonder if the irish guards officer cut the household shite out when instructing the Tipperary South brigade.
I had to speed read the article so might have missed a mention of Tom Barry who was probably the most famous, and subsequently controversial, ex-British serviceman to serve in the IRA.

I wonder who the 3rd Tipp Bde officer was. Paddy Kane was a member of that Bde too. He was an ex-Royal Irish soldier. Fought in the Easter Rising on the wrong side :D and was captured during the March offensive in 1918. His statement to the BMH is an excellent read.
http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1300.pdf
 
Good find @bohs_man
"military savoir-faire" no doubt helped tilt the war in their favour, also the "bitter jealousy" shows that those in charge were personally not professionally reluctant to trust trained sojers. I wonder if the irish guards officer cut the household shite out when instructing the Tipperary South brigade.
I found this interesting thesis online, lots of interesting information including the fact that about 120 ex-servicemen were killed during the Independence war era, mainly for simply having served in the Great War.

http://mural.maynoothuniversity.ie/5120/1/Michael_Joesph_Whelan_20140624124313.pdf

With regards to training the thesis mentions the importance of ex-servicemen. Worth a read.

IRA commander Ernie O'Malley described some training of the period in one of his books:

Ernie O’ Malley described a column training camp and instructors mentioning the
input of Captain Prout, an ex-American officer, who had been attached to the intelligence
squad and also Dermot McManus, an ex-British officer who was attached to the training 53staff at GHQ. ‘Volunteers were trained first for two weeks in the application of arms.
By the end of the period they were trained in the elementaries of the infantry soldier.
During parades the ceremony was a mixture of American and British drill.
 
I found this interesting thesis online, lots of interesting information including the fact that about 120 ex-servicemen were killed during the Independence war era, mainly for simply having served in the Great War.

http://mural.maynoothuniversity.ie/5120/1/Michael_Joesph_Whelan_20140624124313.pdf

With regards to training the thesis mentions the importance of ex-servicemen. Worth a read.

IRA commander Ernie O'Malley described some training of the period in one of his books:

Ernie O’ Malley described a column training camp and instructors mentioning the
input of Captain Prout, an ex-American officer, who had been attached to the intelligence
squad and also Dermot McManus, an ex-British officer who was attached to the training 53staff at GHQ. ‘Volunteers were trained first for two weeks in the application of arms.
By the end of the period they were trained in the elementaries of the infantry soldier.
During parades the ceremony was a mixture of American and British drill.
Haven't had a chance to read the link. Prout became a General in the National Army and led the attack on and liberation of Waterford, Carrick on Suir and Clonmel in late July, early August 1922.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
I had to speed read the article so might have missed a mention of Tom Barry who was probably the most famous, and subsequently controversial, ex-British serviceman to serve in the IRA.

I wonder who the 3rd Tipp Bde officer was. Paddy Kane was a member of that Bde too. He was an ex-Royal Irish soldier. Fought in the Easter Rising on the wrong side :D and was captured during the March offensive in 1918. His statement to the BMH is an excellent read.
http://www.bureauofmilitaryhistory.ie/reels/bmh/BMH.WS1300.pdf
Tom Barry did all right out of the civil war. It is his bar in Cork?
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
Dunno about the bar but he became very unpopular with republicans in later life.
I must look.Difficult to find anything readable on it, especially some years back.It became plain and clear that questions weren’t welcomed. Attempting to find the Collins ambush site around 20years ago, to say it was difficult, would be something of an understatement.
 
I must look.Difficult to find anything readable on it, especially some years back.It became plain and clear that questions weren’t welcomed. Attempting to find the Collins ambush site around 20years ago, to say it was difficult, would be something of an understatement.
I've been there a couple of times in the last few years. Quite well signposted these days. Kilmichael is also in that area and well worth a visit.
 
28 February 1919

Flight Lieutenant Lloyd Lyon MM, RAF was killed when his aircraft crashed into the sea on a flight from England to Baldonnel Aerodrome in Dublin. Lyon was born in Jamaica and had served in France as an infantryman in the Canadian Army from July 1915, enlisting aged 16 in September 1914. He was commissioned in the RFC in January 1918. His body was not recovered and he is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton. Lloyd was one of four brothers who served in WW1, one of whom had died in France in 1915.
 
March 1919

Richard Mulcahy was appointed Chief of Staff of the Irish Volunteers.

Mulcahy generally gets overlooked in the story of the Irish rebellion because he does not cut a romantic figure like Michael Collins. He was however as important, if not more so, as Collins.

Mulcahy was born in Waterford in 1886 and educated there and in Thurles, Co. Tipperary. Like his father (and Collins) he worked for the Post Office. A member of both IRB and the Irish Volunteers, Mulcahy took part in the 1916 Rising fighting at Ashbourne, Co. Meath in one of the few actions outside Dublin. He was interned until December 1916. Mulcahy was elected to the Dáil in 1918 and was assistant Minister for Defence. He and Collins directed the War of Independence and the subsequent Civil War and after Collins death, Mulcahy is largely blamed for executions of Republicans that began in November 1922.

After the Civil War Mulcahy served as either a TD or Senator until the early 1960s and was leader of Fine Gael for a long period. He never served as Taoiseach though. He married a woman named Josephine Ryan in 1920. Two of her sisters married Seán T O'Kelly a Fianna Fáil politician and future President. That must have made family get-togethers interesting.

Richard Mulcahy died in December 1971
 
Last edited:
4 March 1919

The US House of Representatives passed a resolution by 261 votes to 41 expressing an “earnest hope” that the Versailles peace conference would “favourably consider the claims of Ireland to self-determination”. President Wilson was having none of it however having informed a group of Senators a week previously that Ireland would have no vote at the League of Nations. Ireland was a domestic matter for Britain was Wilson's opinion.
 
5 March 1919

Piaras Beaslai, Sinn Féin TD for Kerry East, was arrested for a speech he made at a Robert Emmet commemoration.
Percy Beazley was born in Liverpool, the son of Irish parents. His father was editor of The Catholic Times. Young Percy caught the republican bug while on holidays in Kerry with his family. He fought in the 1916 Rising as 2i/c to Seán MacDiarmada in The Four Courts. During the War of Independence Beaslai was Director of Publicity (propaganda) for the Irish Volunteers/IRA and editor of the organisation’s newspaper An t-Óglach.
 
6 March 1919

Many of those arrested in the German Plot in May 1918 were released from prison in the UK. Among them are Arthur Griffith, William T Cosgrave, Daryl Figgis and Constance Markievicz.

Another man arrested in 1918 was Pierce McCann from Tipperary. He had contracted the flu and died in Gloucester Prison on this day.

The Flu epidemic was making itself felt in Dublin where undertakers at Glasnevin cemetery were struggling to cope with the numbers of interment. Over the course of the last three days, they have had 200 burials. This abnormally high number resulted in delays of a day or so in organising burials.

A busy day today, rounded off tragically by the death of Second Hand James Martin who fell overboard from HM Yacht Boadicea II in Kingstown harbour and drowned. Martin appears to have been born in Bethnal Green in 1879, served through the Great War and is buried in Aberdeen.

Many military are dying almost daily of illness at this time, mainly of the flu. All due respect to them I'm not going to note their deaths but they are recorded by the CWGC and on the cairogang website. I'll confine myself to noting those who died accidentally and, in due course, in combat.
 
Ernie O’ Malley described a column training camp and instructors mentioning the
input of Captain Prout, an ex-American officer, who had been attached to the intelligence
squad ...
Prout apparently had a good rep for the time, no wanton revenge killing of prisoners and only 2 actual executions after trial

He died in 69

His son served on Makin, Saipan and Okinawa with his former WW1 unit, the 165th US INF
 
Prout apparently had a good rep for the time, no wanton revenge killing of prisoners and only 2 actual executions after trial

He died in 69

His son served on Makin, Saipan and Okinawa with his former WW1 unit, the 165th US INF
Very interesting, thank you.
 

Latest Threads

Top