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Irish War of Independence centenary

12 November 1920

Constable Daniel Brien or O’Brien died in a RTA near Watergrasshill, Co. Cork. The accident occurred in darkness at about 5:45 p.m. The driver of the police lorry in which Brien was travelling swerved to avoid a ‘dark object’ in the roadway, which turned out to be two carts joined together near the side of the road. Constable Brien was thrown from the vehicle and suffered a head injury. He was dead on arrival at Cork Military Hospital. Brien was 34 years old and a native of Bandon, Co. Cork.
 
13 November 1920

In the afternoon a patrol of a seven R.I.C. Constables were ambushed at Inches Cross between Lisvernane and Bansha Co. Tipperary. The IRA men were part of the South Tipperary Flying Column, led by Dinny Lacey. Three RIC men were killed and one fatally wounded.

The dead were;

Constable Charles Buntrock, 27 from Essex, one month’s service

Constable Patrick Mackessy, 35 from Ballylongford, Co. Kerry. Had served in the R.I.C. for ten years.

Constable Jeremiah O`Leary, 30 from Kilbrittain, Co. Cork. Nine years’ service.

Fatally wounded

Constable John Miller, 22 from Rathdrum, Co. Wicklow. Miller died the following day. He had been in the RIC for about 6 months.

The survivors were;

Constable Derwent Wallace

Constable William Buntrock. Brother of Charles Buntrock. The two brothers had joined the RIC on October 15th.

Constable Patrick Fardy.

Annie O'Neill, an 8 year old girl, was shot dead while playing outside her home by Auxiliaries as they chased after some men in Charlemont Ave. Dublin. Another 6 year old girl was hit in the arm but survived.
 
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14 November 1920

Constable John Miller died of wounds.

In Co. Galway, a Catholic Priest named Fr. Michael Griffin was arrested by Auxiliaries and taken to Lenaboy Castle for questioning. After the interrogation, Fr. Griffin was shot in the head and buried in a grave in Barna. His remains were found nearly a week later.
 
14 November 1920

Constable John Miller died of wounds.

In Co. Galway, a Catholic Priest named Fr. Michael Griffin was arrested by Auxiliaries and taken to Lenaboy Castle for questioning. After the interrogation, Fr. Griffin was shot in the head and buried in a grave in Barna. His remains were found nearly a week later.

RTE report on the murdered priest:

 
13 November 1920



Annie O'Neill, an 8 year old girl, was shot dead while playing outside her home by Auxiliaries as they chased after some men in Charlemont Ave. Dublin. Another 6 year old girl was hit in the arm but survived.

There is a web site here about the killing of Annie O'Neill, set up by a niece, that has more details.
It seems that several men in a group had run away when approached by the army officers. An officer fired one shot from a revolver at the fugitives, hitting both Annie O'Neill and Teresa Kavanagh. Annie's Father had died from TB two months before this.

Annie's funeral was paid for by Madeleine ffrench-Mullen, who deserves a mention for her other activities. She had been in the ICA and had worked in a first-aid post during the 1916 Easter Rising. With her partner Dr Kathleen Lynn, she had later founded the Saint Ultan's Children's Hospital in Dublin; there were many children suffering from TB and congenital syphilis in the days before anti-biotics.

Madeleine ffrench-Mullen and Kathleen Lynn were said to be 'part of a network of lesbians living in Dublin'.

There were questions asked in the House of Commons about the killing, by T. P O'Connor an Irish Nationalist Party MP, who represented the constituency of Liverpool Scotland, i.e., an area in Liverpool around Scotland Road.

The network of lesbians, the TB clinics and the VD epidemic seem to have been omitted from the approved version of Irish history; we all know there were no such goings-on in holy Catholic Ireland.

I meant to attach this link putting forward some more detail


William Joyce, later infamous as Lord Haw Haw, may have been involved in the murder of Father Griffin, as a 14-year informant for the army.

Joyce had a knife scar running across his right cheek which he said was a razor scar inflicted by Jewish communists. Joyce's first wife said "it wasn't a Jewish Communist who disfigured him .... He was knifed by an Irish woman". I wonder if there was a connection.
 
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15 November 1920

Three British Officers were taken from a train at Waterfall, Co. Cork and subsequently executed. Two others were overlooked and survived.

Waterfall Kidnappings - 15 Nov 1920

IRA Volunteer John Conroy from Rathconnor, Co. Roscommon was taken from his home by armed men and shot dead.

A report appeared in the press, written by an ex-officer, about the drunken behaviour of British soldiers in the village of Balla, Co. Mayo where they shot up houses in the village.
 
Were they members of the IRL - Irish Republican Lesbians?
More the ICLA, the IRL were splitters.
Some knowledgeable Arrse poster (forget who) commented that the Cumann na mBan were 'wall to wall lesbians'; all varieties of non-comformists seem to have been associated more with the Socialists than the (very) Catholic Republicans.

It gives a different connotation to the IRB.
 
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The network of lesbians, the TB clinics and the VD epidemic seem to have been omitted from the approved version of Irish history; we all know there were no such goings-on in holy Ireland.
While being a homosexual man in the UK at the time could get you a long stretch in prison, or executed until 1861, there was no sanction against being a homosexual woman. Possibly because the authorities couldn't conceive of such a thing. One of my mother in law's odder experiences was her own mother asking her in the early 1990s, what a lesbian was. I don't think the old lady believed her.
 
On to Santa's list along with Kevin Myers' new book.

Since Kevin Myers has been discussed on the thread RTE are giving a sneak peek into the aforementioned book:

 
16 November 1920

Two Auxiliaries were captured and killed in Co. Cork. The two men were stationed at Macroom Castle disappeared after they had gone to Cork city on the previous day in a car and stayed overnight at the Imperial Hotel on the South Mall. They were Cadets Bertram Agnew and Lionel Mitchell and their bodies were not recovered.. There’s some confusion over date but it appears that today is the most likely.

Cadet Bertram Agnew

Bertram Agnew

https://theirishrevolution.ie/1920-110/#.X6T07Gj7SM8

Cadet Lionel Mitchell

https://theirishrevolution.ie/1920-111/#.X7Nxgmj7SM8



Over in America De Valera announced the formation of the American Association for the Recognition of the Irish Republic at a meeting in Washington. This marked the final break with the Devoy-Coholan led Friends of Irish Freedom.
 
17 November 1920

RIC Sergeant James O'Donoghue was shot dead in White Street, Cork. He was returning to Barracks at Tuckey Street when attacked by three men. The three I.R.A. men were later identified as Charlie O'Brien, Willie Joe O'Brien and Justin O'Connor. His remains were taken by motor car from St Finbarr’s Church to Cahirciveen for interment. O'Donoghue was aged 46 and from Cahirciveen, Co. Kerry with 22 years service in the RIC. He left a wife and four children to mourn his loss.

After being arrested the previous night, four prisoners were taken by the Auxiliaries from their barracks in the Lakeside Hotel, Ballina onto Killaloe Bridge where they were shot dead while trying to escape with their hands tied behind their backs. The four men were Alphie Rodgers, Michael McMahon, Michael Egan and Martin Kildea. Egan was not a member of the IRA but the other three were.

Killaloe Bridge Murders Nov 1920

Two RIC men – Constables Edward Knights and William Johnson , were arrested in Roscommon for a series of robberies. They were tried on the 18th February 1921and acquitted of robbery but convicted of unlawful possession and dismissed for the RIC.

An RAF Bristol Fighter, which was dropping mail to the military barracks in Waterford city, crashed into houses near the barracks injuring the two crew members.
 
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17 November 1920

RIC Sergeant James O'Donoghue was shot dead in White Street, Cork. He was returning to Barracks at Tuckey Street when attacked by three men. The three I.R.A. men were later identified as Charlie O'Brien, Willie Joe O'Brien and Justin O'Connor. His remains were taken by motor car from St Finbarr’s Church to Cahirciveen for interment.

After being arrested the previous night, four prisoners were taken by the Auxiliaries from their barracks in the Lakeside Hotel, Ballina onto Killaloe Bridge where they were shot dead while trying to escape with their hands tied behind their backs. The four men were Alphie Rodgers, Michael McMahon, Michael Egan and Martin Kildea. Egan was not a member of the IRA but the other three were.

Killaloe Bridge Murders Nov 1920

Two RIC men – Constables Edward Knights and William Johnson , were arrested in Roscommon for a series of robberies. They were tried on the 18th February 1921and acquitted of robbery but convicted of unlawful possession and dismissed for the RIC.

An RAF Bristol Fighter, which was dropping mail to the military barracks in Waterford city, crashed into houses near the barracks injuring the two crew members.
Someone must have left the landing light on.....I'll get me coat... ;)
 
17 November 1920


An RAF Bristol Fighter, which was dropping mail to the military barracks in Waterford city, crashed into houses near the barracks injuring the two crew members.

That's impressive, more impressive that the crew survived.

From "The book Reminiscences of Waterford" by Michelle M. O'Neill.

"In November 1920, an aeroplane crashed on the roofs of two houses in Barrack Street and was totally wrecked. The plane was a "Scout" type and was carrying despatches from Fermoy to the Military Barracks at Waterford. It stuck upside down on the roof of the licensed premises of Mr Aspel and the private house of Mrs McSweeney, just opposite the barracks gate. The names of the occupants were flying officers Briggs and McKiehan"

The accident involved a Number 2 Squadron (RAF) Bristol Fighter, serial number H1490. The crew were Flying Officer Briggs and his observer McKeechan. One broke a leg, the other an arm.

Were they flying inverted while delivering the mail?

PS It is reported to have had engine trouble. The incident is mentioned on P195 of this copy of the Waterford Archaelogical and Historical Society journal. The British had been forced to use aircraft to deliver despatches by lack of radios and by the IRA intercepting mail and cutting telephone lines.
 
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DAS

War Hero
That's impressive, more impressive that the crew survived.

From "The book Reminiscences of Waterford" by Michelle M. O'Neill.

"In November 1920, an aeroplane crashed on the roofs of two houses in Barrack Street and was totally wrecked. The plane was a "Scout" type and was carrying despatches from Fermoy to the Military Barracks at Waterford. It stuck upside down on the roof of the licensed premises of Mr Aspel and the private house of Mrs McSweeney, just opposite the barracks gate. The names of the occupants were flying officers Briggs and McKiehan"

The accident involved a Number 2 Squadron (RAF) Bristol Fighter, serial number H1490. The crew were Flying Officer Briggs and his observer McKeechan. One broke a leg, the other an arm.

Were they flying inverted while delivering the mail?
Could well have rolled to drop, although that would have just been showing off I think.
 
18 November 1920

Another aeroplane story today, with a less favourable outcome. This one crashlanded in a field in Co. Clare, a few miles from Limerick city. A guard was mounted on the aircraft by men of the 1st Bn Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. In the early evening the guard was attacked by an IRA group from the East Clare Bde, with one of the soldiers being killed and another fatally wounded.

5373641 Private Alfred Spackman, 1st Bn Ox & Bucks LI was killed immediately. He was aged 17 and from Berkshire and is interred in Knowl Hill (St Peter) Church cemetery, Hurley.

5373574 Private Maurice Robins, 1st Bn Ox & Bucks LI died 3 February 1921 in Fermoy Military Hospital. He was from Oxfordshire, aged 18 and is commemorated on the Brookwood Memorial. Robins was buried in Wexham but the location of his grave seems to have been lost.

Crashed Aircraft in Clare

Three men died in the early hours of the 18th November in reprisals following the killing of RIC Sergeant James O'Donoghue in Cork. At the inquests some witnesses gave evidence that the men who did the shooting wore Army uniform. Others said Police uniform. The three dead were:

Patrick Hanley, age 17. A member of Fianna Éireann, Hanley was shot dead in his home at Broad Street, which he shared with his widowed mother and sister. A witness saw two RIC men enter the house and thought that Hanley may have been mistaken for Tommy Healey, an IRA man suspected of being involved in the killing of O’Donoghue.

The RIC visited the home of another suspect, Willie O’Brien, at Broad Lane, where they shot dead Eugene O’Connell. Eugene had served in the Royal Munster Fusiliers and had been wounded in WW1. It’s unclear if he was in the IRA or not. Some sources say that Charlie O'Brien was shot and wounded here also. If so, Charlie,, who had participated in the killing of O’Donoghue, got off light.

James Coleman, answered a knock at his front door at North Mall at 3.15 am. His wife testified that a man in police uniform shot her husband dead. Coleman had no IRA connections. A man named Stephen Coleman was also reported shot and wounded in Broad St but it’s unclear if this is the same man or not.
 
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