Irish War of Independence centenary...and The Truce

21 June 1922

In Belfast, 70 year old William Miller was breaking wood in his back yard at 29 Willowfield Street when men climbed over his back wall and shot him. Miller died of his wounds.

Thomas Johnstone and P.Ward died from gunshot wounds received during earlier disturbances.

More businesses were targeted by arsonists, including Ferguson’s motor works on May Street and the Carnegie Library on the Falls Road.

Stephen G. Tallents arrived in Belfast at the behest of the British government to enquire and report on the breakdown of the Craig-Collins pact. Tallents stayed until 1st July and delivered the required whitewash. He blamed the IRA for the disturbances and said that the violence was an organized conspiracy planned with the knowledge and support of Collins himself. He did criticise a number of the unionist ministers including Dawson Bates. He obligingly concluded that no public enquiry should be held into the communal violence.

Tallents was one of those almost unknown civil servants who run things.

Sean MacEoin and Alice Cooney got married in Longford. The previous day McEoin had been elected to the Dáil, comfortably topping the poll in Longford-Westmeath. The counting of votes went on until June 24th.

So when does the Northern Offensive start?
 
Might be book of interest to those on this thread.


And wonderful use of a line from Yeats as the title -

I ranted to the knave and fool,
But outgrew that school,
Would transform the part,
Fit audience found, but cannot rule
My fanatic heart.

I sought my betters: though in each
Fine manners, liberal speech,
Turn hatred into sport,
Nothing said or done can reach
My fanatic heart.

Out of Ireland have we come.
Great hatred, little room,
Maimed us at the start.
I carry from my mother's womb
A fanatic heart.

On an aside, that poem does make me smile when I read some of the posts on other threaders by users of ARRSE.
 
22 June 1922
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Sir Henry Wilson was shot dead outside his home in Eaton Square, London by IRA men, Reggie Dunne and Joseph O'Sullivan. Dunne was O/C of the IRA’s London Battalion. Wilson was born in Longford in 1864 and had been Chief of the Imperial General Staff until February 1922 after which he became an MP and acted as Military Adviser to the Northern Ireland government. Dunne and O'Sullivan were ironically both born in England and were WW1 veterans, O’Sullivan leaving a leg behind him in France. Two police officers and a civilian were shot as the IRA men attempted to escape. Dunne and O'Sullivan were tried at the Old Bailey and received death sentences on the 18th July. They were hanged on August 10th.

Special Constable Robert McDowell was shot dead while holidaying near Greystones, Co. Wicklow. Edited to add that that is one version. Another source says that McDowell wasn't a Special but worked as Butler to a family in Lurgan. He was mistakenly believed to be a SpecialConstable and was taken from his parents home where he was staying and then shot dead.
 

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Sir Henry Wilson was shot dead outside his home in Eaton Square, London by IRA men, Reggie Dunne and Joseph O'Sullivan. Dunne was O/C of the IRA’s London Battalion. Wilson was born in Longford in 1864 and had been Chief of the Imperial General Staff until February 1922 after which he became an MP and acted as Military Adviser to the Northern Ireland government. Dunne and O'Sullivan were ironically both born in England and were WW1 veterans, O’Sullivan leaving a leg behind him in France. Two police officers and a civilian were shot as the IRA men attempted to escape. Dunne and O'Sullivan were tried at the Old Bailey and received death sentences on the 18th July. They were hanged on August 10th.

Special Constable Robert McDowell was shot dead while holidaying near Greystones, Co. Wicklow.
I put up some information on this affair some time back and will dig it out later.
 

Sir Henry Wilson was shot dead outside his home in Eaton Square, London by IRA men, Reggie Dunne and Joseph O'Sullivan. Dunne was O/C of the IRA’s London Battalion. Wilson was born in Longford in 1864 and had been Chief of the Imperial General Staff until February 1922 after which he became an MP and acted as Military Adviser to the Northern Ireland government. Dunne and O'Sullivan were ironically both born in England and were WW1 veterans, O’Sullivan leaving a leg behind him in France. Two police officers and a civilian were shot as the IRA men attempted to escape. Dunne and O'Sullivan were tried at the Old Bailey and received death sentences on the 18th July. They were hanged on August 10th.

Special Constable Robert McDowell was shot dead while holidaying near Greystones, Co. Wicklow.

You can see his plaque in Liverpool Street station, it's just up by the entrance by the McSatans
 
Murder of Sir Henry Wilson:


And as mentioned before, where he is commemorated :


Dunne and O'Sullivan, both ex-servicemen, were executed and repatriated in 1967 where they are now buried in the Republican plot in Deansgrange. The link below shows plenty of CWGC and private memorials to ex-servicemen:


Dunne and O'Sullivan's graves are about half way down the page.

Some news today:

 
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Dunne and O'Sullivan, both ex-servicemen, were executed and repatriated in 1967 where they are now buried in the Republican plot in Deansgrange.
Repatriated is possibly the wrong word to use. While both men had Irish heritage, they were actually English. Dunne's ancestry was a grandfather from Longford. Strangely, Wilson was more Irish than his killers. His assassination was fairly pointless at that stage and was in fact counter-productive.
 
23 June 1922

Belfast

Leo Rea, age 16, was shot dead on his way to work.

William Kirkwood, age 27, the manager of Hughes and Dickson’s mill in Divis Street was shot dead as he left the mill on his lunchbreak.

John Ireland, age 37, was shot dead by a British Army patrol in the York Street area.

Joseph Hurson, age 15, was shot dead and his brother wounded by a sniper as they left their house at 87 Unity Street.

Mary Semple, age 25, died of injuries received on an earlier date.

Three men were shot dead by an Army and Special Constabulary patrol in Cushendall, Co. Antrim. The three dead were Seamus McAllister, John Gore and John Hill. Two others were wounded. The patrol claimed to have been ambushed by the IRA but a subsequent inquiry rejected the claim.

The British met in aftermath of the killing of Wilson. General Macready, still commander of British Forces in Ireland, also attended. The Cabinet subsequently sent a letter to Collins saying that documents found on Wilson’s assassins connected them with the anti-Treaty side. The letter went on to say that the occupation of the Four Courts and the position of the IRA could no longer be tolerated. They formally asked the Provisional Government to end the occupation forthwith. The Cabinet offered Collins the artillery to do the job. Collins was out of Dublin so a reply was sent from the Provisional Government on the same day, by Diarmaid O’Hegarty, asking for the information which the British government had connecting the men in the Four Courts with the Wilson. O’Hegarty pointed out that internal dissension would destroy the Four Courts garrison anyway. Churchill refused to release the requested information, possibly because the documents found on Wilson’s assassins did not link them with the men in the Four Courts. On the evening of the 23rd, the Cabinet decided to attack the Four Courts if the FSA did not, the attack to take place on either the 25th or 26th. Macready strongly opposed this decision but he was ordered to return to Dublin and prepare for the attack.

While London was deciding all this , a meeting was held in Dublin between Griffith, Emmet Dalton, Andy Cope and two British Army officers to discuss the continued occupation of the Four Courts.
 
Repatriated is possibly the wrong word to use. While both men had Irish heritage, they were actually English. Dunne's ancestry was a grandfather from Longford. Strangely, Wilson was more Irish than his killers. His assassination was fairly pointless at that stage and was in fact counter-productive.
Agreed, a pair of strange bedfellows and a pointless assassination.
 
Murder of Sir Henry Wilson:


And as mentioned before, where he is commemorated :


Dunne and O'Sullivan, both ex-servicemen, were executed and repatriated in 1967 where they are now buried in the Republican plot in Deansgrange. The link below shows plenty of CWGC and private memorials to ex-servicemen:


Dunne and O'Sullivan's graves are about half way down the page.

Some news today:

Did Corbyn and QM McD attend?
 
Might be book of interest to those on this thread.


And wonderful use of a line from Yeats as the title -



On an aside, that poem does make me smile when I read some of the posts on other threaders by users of ARRSE.
Guardian article mentions Jo Cox but not Sir David Amess as other MP's murdered!
 
Funnily enough they didn't mention John Robert Jermain Macnamara of the other 70 - 80 or so dead MPs who are commemorated on plaques in the Commons

TBF - He died on active service, one perhaps could have mentioned Mr Neave who was assassinated.

As I say, the Guardian do themselves no credit.

MPs being murdered is an assault on our system, as well as a personal tragedy. We should defend individual life, and the intergrity of the Crown in Parliamentary Democracy.

(But I am rather tediously proceedural like that).
 
24 June 1922

In Belfast, 4 month old Isabella Foster was killed in her home on Ballycarry Street by a stray bullet which came through the window.

Bella McKeown, age 22, died in the Mater Hospital as a result of gunshot injuries received on June 1st.

The British government made a definite decision to attack the Four Courts on the following day. Macready, who had returned to Dublin, received a telegram to this effect. Macready planned the details with General Boyd but also sent a staff officer, Colonel Brind, to London with a letter arguing against the attack. Macready argued that an attack would increase public support for the men in the Four Courts and could unite the pro- and anti-Treaty factions. If the attack had materialised, it would have been a great irony that Wilson's death would have provoked what he proposed in life, the reconquest of Ireland by the British.

It was reported that Cecile Wilson had caused a bit of controversy when she requested that no cabinet minister attend her husband's funeral. The government went into a panic that the request might be seen as an insult to King George and Cecile backed down.

Arthur Griffith and Eamon Duggan travelled to Kildare barracks to talk to the leaders of the Civic Guard Mutiny. They offered the men full payment of all money due to them (their pay had been stopped at the start of the mutiny), an inquiry to be held into their grievances but in the meantime all the men were to be suspended. The proposals were accepted. After the men were paid, a number went drinking in Newbridge and one man, Farrell Liddy from Leitrim, was accidently shot dead.
 
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TBF - He died on active service, one perhaps could have mentioned Mr Neave who was assassinated.

As I say, the Guardian do themselves no credit.

MPs being murdered is an assault on our system, as well as a personal tragedy. We should defend individual life, and the intergrity of the Crown in Parliamentary Democracy.

(But I am rather tediously proceedural like that).
What do you want every dead person commemorated in Parliament mentioned? There are hundreds of them. The particular plaque this time was to an MP killed 100 years ago and smacks of a political stunt to make Ulster Unionist MPs feel warm and fuzzy.
 

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