Irish (republic) Servicemen in British Army

Lookong forward to your nomination for this year's SPOTY.
Enjoy.
If ever there was a sign of a sad spastic it was someone who thought a SPOTY nomination was some sort of threat.

So no more pointless yarns that have nothing to do with deserters leaving their army to join another?
 

SpudGunny

War Hero
Bit of an open secret nowadays. Early 90s was a different vibe though. Discretion was certainly called for and certain pubs were definitely avoided when the few lads I knew came back on leave. Over the years several from my regiment joined up. Family and close friends were the only ones that knew and I was often on ‘Ze List’ of dependable, discrete craic havers. Definitely no shame attached to it. I admired them for having the sand to get up and do it.

As far as I know I’m the only one from my crowd that went ‘over the water’ in the other direction. As mentioned earlier US service wasn’t frowned at at all. Even if my own efforts were just like Homer Simpson’s in the USN reserve.
 
I was Irish Army myself.

I do recall a chap in a night club about 20 years ago who was free talking about being in the BA. Bouncers left him out the backdoor to get away from a few of the local barstoolers who called around for a word. Most people in teh south don't care what army you serve with but it pays to be cautious IMO.
 
What arrested deserters / prisoners?

There weren’t any, at least not in great numbers

This is the legislation that the deserters received a subsequent “pardon” from

The guy whose book I illustrated was arrested off the boat, by Military Police and his name was read out from a list at the end of the gangplank. He subsequently was detained in Cork Prison for a year after a cursory Military trial (he described it as a foregone conclusion) and was released after a year. The figure he used was a hundred men detained, all of whom were arrested as they came off the boat. One of the "fun" punishments was to be made to stand in pouring rain for twelve hours at night.
 
I am doing research mostly just out of interest in all honesty about soldiers who joined the British army that army from the republic of Ireland and wondering If anyone knows if they face stigma in the Republic of Ireland. I know a fair amount of Irish soldiers who served in the British armed forces but most are from Northern Ireland. Any ideas or insight would be truly appreciated. Please excuse if my question is naïve in nature as it is very sincere.

Chap I worked with was Irish, he was a L\Cpl when I was a Pte., he got Cpl. when I moved off to do my long trade course. I later met up with him again when we were both posted into a HQ, he was a SSGT and I was a Sgt. His sister was also a WRAC somewhere. He never mentioned any problems about going home but, both his and my trade both had OPSEC and PERSEC expectations.
 
I am doing research mostly just out of interest in all honesty about soldiers who joined the British army that army from the republic of Ireland and wondering If anyone knows if they face stigma in the Republic of Ireland. I know a fair amount of Irish soldiers who served in the British armed forces but most are from Northern Ireland. Any ideas or insight would be truly appreciated. Please excuse if my question is naïve in nature as it is very sincere.
I hold an Irish passport but if I told anyone in Ireland I was in the British Army they would probably laugh anyway because I'm not white... and also because they think part timers is a funny concept as well as us
 
Something like 50,000 Irishmen (from memory) died in the Great War. Regiments from both religious denominations fought side by side on the Somme.

It’s very likely that family history plays a big part in encouraging people from the South to join the British Army, irrespective of political and religious realities.
...and many more since in WW2 and other small wars. Whilst there is a small memorial at the NMA dedicated to Irish Infantry Regt, I've always felt that there should be a prominent and dedicated memorial to all of the fallen Irish
 
That may well be the case, but a recent court case showed that the Government recognise them as British no matter what an individual says they are.
Baggy is that you?
 
...and many more since in WW2 and other small wars. Whilst there is a small memorial at the NMA dedicated to Irish Infantry Regt, I've always felt that there should be a prominent and dedicated memorial to all of the fallen Irish
It is not a tradition that has faded

 

TheSockPuppet

On ROPS
On ROPs
If they are from Northern Ireland they are British, not Irish.
They are both Irish and British. Those from Norn Iron sit in the middle of a Venn diagram that includes the British Isles, Ireland and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
England-vs-GB-Vs-UK.gif
 
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I hold an Irish passport but if I told anyone in Ireland I was in the British Army they would probably laugh anyway because I'm not white...
I met a black person once but he wasn't much of a laugh.
 
They are both Irish and British. Those from Norn Iron sit in the middle of a Venn diagram that includes the British Isles, Ireland and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
View attachment 654499
Better not tell the people of Dundalk, Donegal and Dublin they are in the United Kingdom
 
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