Irish officer applicants

#1
Given that our Paddy chums don't do GCSE's, A-Levels and the like, does anyone know what Sandhurst's academic entry requirements are for the Irish? I ask on behalf of a friend who's being told by a London recruiting office that they can't apply to the British Army as an officer as they don't have GCSE's - patent nonsense. Can any kind Arrser clear up this one?
 
#2
Scottish applicants don't do them either but there are loads of us Scottish Officers !!!!
 
#3
Contact Sandhurst directly, they will give you the gen.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
The Intermediate Certificate is the equivalent of GCSE, the Leaving Certificate is the equivalent of "A" Levels and a First Degree (BA/BSc) from UCD or TCD (or amy of the other fine institutions of learning) is the equivalent of its UK counterpart.
 
#5
Intermediate Certificate!!! You are showing your age - That's gone about 15 years!!! Its now called the Junior Certificate...

Other than that you are quite right though....
Junior Certificate = GCSE
Leaving Certificate = A-levels

Degrees are pretty much equal. Although usually they take 4 years in Ireland. I think this is because our Leaving Certificate doesn't go quite as in depth as your A-levels. I've heard it said that A-levels are roughly equal to 1st year at an Irish university. The difference is we do at least 6 subjects in the Leaving Certificate and many students do 7 or 8 subjects.

I suggest your mate contacts the Army Careers Advisor in Belfast - top bloke up there, he'll sort you out.
Contact details here... http://www.armedforces.co.uk/army/listings/l0107.html

Tricam.
 
#8
I think you'll find that the Junior Certificate and Leaving Certifcate are graded at a slightly lower level than GCSE's and A-Levels. So the Junior Cert is at a lower level than GCSE's. I know this because apparently I wasn't educationally qualified to go officer in the Navy (which I now know was boll0cks-cheers AFCO Belfast.....) hence I joined as a rating. However, it is a common fact in Ireland that if you fcuk up your Leaving Certificate, you will have no problems getting into a Uni in the UK. I'm still trying to get my head around that one.
I do believe that the last time a question was asked in parliment as to the number of Irish commissioned officers in the army, the answer was somewhere in the region of 25 at least.
 
#9
I Remember a fledgling Irish MD on a CMDVLP course at Sandhurst 1975, graduate of Trinity College Dublin. Told me he felt decidedly uncomfortable receiving mail marked On Her Majesty's Service while at university, this in the early 1970s!
Great guy often wonder what became of him.
 
#10
Try having your fecking neighbours opening your joining instructions 'delivered by mistake'-

Tricam is right about the education system and requirments and I'd back him up on the recruiter in Belfast as well. Absolutly a great guy.
 
#11
Well guys, being probably the only, or one of only one or two Paddies going into Sandhurst this month, I think I can say with some authority that Irish citizens can join the British Army as an officer (otherwise somebody has made a horrible mistake and I'll have a nasty surprise when I report next Sunday :) But if you read the nationality requirements they read something like "must be a citizen of the Uk, Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland". Now, don't ask me why us Irish are the only exception, that I don't know.
 
#12
smythst said:
Well guys, being probably the only, or one of only one or two Paddies going into Sandhurst this month
when I was there there was almost one per platoon. There were four in my company - almost as many Irish as Scottish - and it was about 50/50 Northern Irish/Republic.

Together with the two Irish D/S officers I trained under, I find it absolutely unbelieveable that the number of Irish officers could possibly be as low as 25, even if you only count blokes from the Republic.
 
#14
Yes the 25 figure seems very low doesn't it???
Yep. If thats the case then Im and the four other subbies I know are a 1/5 of the total 8O 8O

As has been mentioned already the whole not doing A levels is rubbish. So long as he has a recognised equivilant ((6 Irish Leaving cert passes, 2 at Honours level) inc English and Maths)) Hes fine. AT least it was when I did RCB in 2002.
 
#15
The only reason why the Leaving Cert is slightly below the A level is that with 8 subjects the Leaving Cert can only incorporate a proportion of that learnt at A level. eg English Lit you would only get to learn about 3/4 that you would doing it in A Level.

As for longer degree courses, that may be because some of them take on two subjects. A friend of mine at Trinity had to do Maths and Civil Engineering on his course. Also, they tend to go in for a lot of placements in the second or third year.
 
#16
Bottom line, as many have observed, is: Irish exams will not stop your buddy from joining up. He'll be one of many.

A few myths about Irish edumication 'n stuff have bubbled up on this thread, so allow me to blather. Or else save yourselves the effort and stop reading now.

smythst said:
Well guys, being probably the only, or one of only one or two Paddies going into Sandhurst this month, I think I can say with some authority that Irish citizens can join the British Army as an officer (otherwise somebody has made a horrible mistake and I'll have a nasty surprise when I report next Sunday :) But if you read the nationality requirements they read something like "must be a citizen of the Uk, Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland". Now, don't ask me why us Irish are the only exception, that I don't know.
The Irish are the exception because Ireland was a member of the Commonwealth until 1949. Irish citizens are for that reason not treated by English law as aliens, and so can vote in UK elections, sit in Parliament, etc., as well as join the forces of Her Maj.

Rifle-Green-Sex-Machine said:
As for longer degree courses, that may be because some of them take on two subjects. A friend of mine at Trinity had to do Maths and Civil Engineering on his course. Also, they tend to go in for a lot of placements in the second or third year."
ricam said:
Degrees are pretty much equal. Although usually they take 4 years in Ireland. I think this is because our Leaving Certificate doesn't go quite as in depth as your A-levels.
Irish (and Scottish) undergrad degrees tend to take four years for historical reasons - not to compensate for some supposed deficiency in secondary education in those countries which is not present in England. I mean, come on.

The idea was that the first year of the longer course would introduce students to a broad range of subjects, from which they would choose those in which they wanted to specialise. These days, that intro year is limited to liberal arts degrees: in the case of many others, students just start their chosen specialist subjects from day one.

It's simply good luck that the four-year programme already allows for work experience or a year at a European university. Some UK universities (eg, Oxford) are phasing out three-year degrees in subjects such as Modern Languages, where a year in-country is seen as crucial.

the_matelot said:
I think you'll find that the Junior Certificate and Leaving Certifcate are graded at a slightly lower level than GCSE's and A-Levels. So the Junior Cert is at a lower level than GCSE's.
The Junior Cert and GCSEs are more or less equivalent.

The Leaving Cert is regarded as being of a slightly lower educational standard than A-Levels because most people who take it do at least six subjects, with eight or nine being common, while three A-Levels is the usual in the UK.

But this approach has always bothered me. The Leaving Cert is actually marked significantly more harshly than A-Levels: for example, only about 10% of those taking Leaving Cert mathematics get an A, as opposed to around 30% taking the A-Level in hard sums.

Put another way: those who get eight As in their Leaving Cert get their photo in the national papers as Top Spod, whereas people with five As at A-Level are a dime a dozen. You should see some of the CVs from aspiring henchmen I get to read.
 
#17
Speaking of qualifications folks,Has anyone any knowledge of a serving soldier, sailor or airman in the past or present who has the necessary qualifications to embark on a career as an officer but declined and joined the services as an ordinary Private, Airman and Seaman and how far did they get into the job before they either quit or were promoted into the officer ranks.Your views please.
 
#18
smythst said:
Well guys, being probably the only, or one of only one or two Paddies going into Sandhurst this month, I think I can say with some authority that Irish citizens can join the British Army as an officer (otherwise somebody has made a horrible mistake and I'll have a nasty surprise when I report next Sunday :) But if you read the nationality requirements they read something like "must be a citizen of the Uk, Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland". Now, don't ask me why us Irish are the only exception, that I don't know.
Good luck to you my friend!

Are you attending RMAS as a 'Foriegn Student' or joining the British Army, and therefore swearing an oath to our Sovereign?
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#19
TartanJock said:
Speaking of qualifications folks,Has anyone any knowledge of a serving soldier, sailor or airman in the past or present who has the necessary qualifications to embark on a career as an officer but declined and joined the services as an ordinary Private, Airman and Seaman and how far did they get into the job before they either quit or were promoted into the officer ranks.Your views please.
Plenty to be found. In my own Corps, the Int Corps, there are a good number of NCOs and WOs who turned up for their basic training in possession of stacks of A levels, Bachelor's Degrees and a fair smattering of Postgrad degrees as well. Being an officer isn't about educational qualifications but about aptitude.
 
#20
TartanJock said:
Speaking of qualifications folks,Has anyone any knowledge of a serving soldier, sailor or airman in the past or present who has the necessary qualifications to embark on a career as an officer but declined and joined the services as an ordinary Private, Airman and Seaman and how far did they get into the job before they either quit or were promoted into the officer ranks.Your views please.
Hundreds. Your point is?
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top