Irish Headline of the day

There is a protocol about the wearing of foreign uniforms in the ROI. Not sure about the 'no ties' ... Dress down Friday?
I'm re-reading "Wings On My Sleeve" and 'Winkle' relates the story of travelling to the ROI to pick up a German aircraft 'captured' there. They had been asked/told to travel in mufti but the Crab in charge said they would wear uniform. 'Winkle' recounts that the initial greeting was chilly but once they had changed into their civvies the welcome couldn't have been warmer.
 
I'm re-reading "Wings On My Sleeve" and 'Winkle' relates the story of travelling to the ROI to pick up a German aircraft 'captured' there. They had been asked/told to travel in mufti but the Crab in charge said they would wear uniform. 'Winkle' recounts that the initial greeting was chilly but once they had changed into their civvies the welcome couldn't have been warmer.
Maybe not so warm for American military personnel who are rounded up like stray sheep at the Cliffs of Moher and returned to the herd at Shannon Airport. And there they are left to harmlessly wander the aisles of Duty Free while the locals are trying to get their heads the 'fags and booze' allowance for the Ryanair return to Lanzarote.
 
Foreign military personnel visiting Ireland are allowed to wear military uniform once so authorised by the Department of Foreign affairs. Commonly done for conferences, diplomatic functions, port visits and the likes.

The US military received a blanket authorisation for their transits through Shannon Airport in 2003 for example.
 
NATO conference held in Cork, Ireland

Two NATO events in the RoI within a couple of weeks, a question RoI heading for NATO membership via the back door?
Whilst there is an appetite for NATO membership in Ireland among certain members of the political classes here, the general public is highly ignorant on this aspect of foreign affairs and defence. NATO is generally viewed in the negative and seen as tool for pushing nefarious western agendas rather than collective defence.

There is little appetite in Ireland for Defence spending and it is viewed by the public as massive waste of money. Irish spending on defence is already well below 1% GDP and most people would still view this as far too high. A news article appears about how the Irish Army has received new APCs and you will have people on the airwaves vocalising how this could have been better spent on a few hospital beds.

The general Irish logic is that if you can't defend yourself, nobody will attack you. It's the naive attitude that convinced people that spending nothing on defence during the cold war would have saved us from potential nuclear annihilation. Basically spending on defence and joining NATO equals warmongering. Perhaps it could have been possible post Good Friday Agreement if 9/11, Iraq etc never happened. Don't forget the main reason Ireland didn't join in the first place is because the UK was in.

So whilst there may be appetite behind the scenes, no politician in Ireland is ever going to advocate joining NATO. Political kyrptonite.
 
Whilst there is an appetite for NATO membership in Ireland among certain members of the political classes here, the general public is highly ignorant on this aspect of foreign affairs and defence. NATO is generally viewed in the negative and seen as tool for pushing nefarious western agendas rather than collective defence.

There is little appetite in Ireland for Defence spending and it is viewed by the public as massive waste of money. Irish spending on defence is already well below 1% GDP and most people would still view this as far too high. A news article appears about how the Irish Army has received new APCs and you will have people on the airwaves vocalising how this could have been better spent on a few hospital beds.

The general Irish logic is that if you can't defend yourself, nobody will attack you. It's the naive attitude that convinced people that spending nothing on defence during the cold war would have saved us from potential nuclear annihilation. Basically spending on defence and joining NATO equals warmongering. Perhaps it could have been possible post Good Friday Agreement if 9/11, Iraq etc never happened. Don't forget the main reason Ireland didn't join in the first place is because the UK was in.

So whilst there may be appetite behind the scenes, no politician in Ireland is ever going to advocate joining NATO. Political kyrptonite.
Interesting brief, this is why it is good to speak on forums like this to hear other views. On the conventional non nuclear side, RoI gets all the protection it needs from external conventional attack from NATO, which if you look on all sides of the map, surrounds RoI. So Soviet invasion during Cold War would have met with reaction from UK, France, USA and Canada? So little point in joining, RoI modest forces have full commitment to internal security and UN Ops (which relieves some NATO countries of the burden?) so there could be little to contribute in military terms.

Did remember somewhere there was some talk. late 1950's of RoI joining NATO as USN were interested in base facilities in Cork. May be that smacked of the treaty ports though even if the Irish/American card had been played.
 
Interesting brief, this is why it is good to speak on forums like this to hear other views. On the conventional non nuclear side, RoI gets all the protection it needs from external conventional attack from NATO, which if you look on all sides of the map, surrounds RoI. So Soviet invasion during Cold War would have met with reaction from UK, France, USA and Canada? So little point in joining, RoI modest forces have full commitment to internal security and UN Ops (which relieves some NATO countries of the burden?) so there could be little to contribute in military terms.

Did remember somewhere there was some talk. late 1950's of RoI joining NATO as USN were interested in base facilities in Cork. May be that smacked of the treaty ports though even if the Irish/American card had been played.
There was also interest in the utilising Shannon airport as a base for MPA. With its location on the west coast of Ireland, it could have been very useful. There was also an offer of a bi-lateral US/Ireland alliance during the early cold war era but this was rejected for fear of upsetting the British government. It was either join NATO in full or nothing at all. Essentially I think Ireland's aversion to NATO and love of neutrality is due to money. Deep down, the state and its people don't want to pay.

With regards Ireland geographical location; aside from Canada potentially, I really can't think of a country with a more benign placement on the map. Ireland is essentially defenseless from attack by an advanced military power and it doesn't make a difference due to its location.
 
Interesting brief, this is why it is good to speak on forums like this to hear other views. On the conventional non nuclear side, RoI gets all the protection it needs from external conventional attack from NATO, which if you look on all sides of the map, surrounds RoI. So Soviet invasion during Cold War would have met with reaction from UK, France, USA and Canada? So little point in joining, RoI modest forces have full commitment to internal security and UN Ops (which relieves some NATO countries of the burden?) so there could be little to contribute in military terms.

Did remember somewhere there was some talk. late 1950's of RoI joining NATO as USN were interested in base facilities in Cork. May be that smacked of the treaty ports though even if the Irish/American card had been played.
kap.jpg
I suspect this huge runway stuck on top of a mountain in the middle of Mayo in the early 70s wasn't just at the behest of some batshit crazy old priest who had dreams of flying in planeloads of religious maniacs to His shrine. Air bridge to Europe anyone? ;)
 
Not wishing to bang on about this subject, but what happened to the no uniform protocol in Cork ?

NATO conference held in Cork, Ireland

Two NATO events in the RoI within a couple of weeks, a question RoI heading for NATO membership via the back door?
Well, someone has to pay for most of it if Trump follows-up on his threats and de-scales or pulls out altogether . . . :rolleyes:

NOTE: Tongue VERY FIRMLY IN CHEEK on this comment
 
Whilst there is an appetite for NATO membership in Ireland among certain members of the political classes here, the general public is highly ignorant on this aspect of foreign affairs and defence. NATO is generally viewed in the negative and seen as tool for pushing nefarious western agendas rather than collective defence.

There is little appetite in Ireland for Defence spending and it is viewed by the public as massive waste of money. Irish spending on defence is already well below 1% GDP and most people would still view this as far too high. A news article appears about how the Irish Army has received new APCs and you will have people on the airwaves vocalising how this could have been better spent on a few hospital beds.

The general Irish logic is that if you can't defend yourself, nobody will attack you. It's the naive attitude that convinced people that spending nothing on defence during the cold war would have saved us from potential nuclear annihilation. Basically spending on defence and joining NATO equals warmongering. Perhaps it could have been possible post Good Friday Agreement if 9/11, Iraq etc never happened. Don't forget the main reason Ireland didn't join in the first place is because the UK was in.

So whilst there may be appetite behind the scenes, no politician in Ireland is ever going to advocate joining NATO. Political kyrptonite.
According to the NATO website, Ireland is a "partner country" and so participates in activities with NATO involvement. Just not a full member and obviously not subject to Article 5 protection (directly) but as posted elsewhere, by dint of location they are in a relatively safe place for avoiding a direct invasion but not so naive as not to continue strong links with other Western countries in order to be part of the overall strategy.

https://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/topics_51979.htm

By being involved one wonders how much they actually save, although I suppose there is no immediate pressure on them to commit 2% of GDP to defence.
 
By being involved one wonders how much they actually save, although I suppose there is no immediate pressure on them to commit 2% of GDP to defence.
0.3% but Ireland's GDP figures aren't fully reliable due to the impact of multi-national companies on the economy. Lowest in Europe as far as I know.
 

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