Irish Headline of the day

The current spell of bad weather is referred to as 2018 in the meteorological community.

On a positive note the 2018 Hurricane Season is almost upon us.
Gary give me the proper translation of the term "an revogue" spelling a bit dodgy, my friends in Mayo insist the weather will not settle untill it,s been and gone, cheers
maybe @aul wan is familiar with it
@Gary Cooper @Aul_Wan
 
No.The stake through His heart should keep Him from rotation...:rolleyes:
He could still spin about the stake. They should have use two stakes at 90 degrees; to be sure.
Dev the Impaler.
 
Phonetically you’re spot on. It’s “ an riamhog” or bog-lark.
didn't know about the "bog lark" bit but I was under the impression it was Irish myth/legend that in April three bad days were taken out of March to see off an old cow. odd I know? but I'm a great believer in the old country sayings.
 
didn't know about the "bog lark" bit but I was under the impression it was Irish myth/legend that in April three bad days were taken out of March to see off an old cow. odd I know? but I'm a great believer in the old country sayings.
Bog larks are better known as meadow pipits (robbed that nugget off an IT article in 1999- No twitcher I) and are summer visitors so it makes sense that their arrival are linked to better weather.
Never heard of the old cow thing but that stuff is fascinating. My grandmother left out food and drink for “the other crowd” and she wouldn’t be singular in that.
 
Bog larks are better known as meadow pipits (robbed that nugget off an IT article in 1999- No twitcher I) and are summer visitors so it makes sense that their arrival are linked to better weather.
Never heard of the old cow thing but that stuff is fascinating. My grandmother left out food and drink for “the other crowd” and she wouldn’t be singular in that.
my friends mother is 92 and still swears by Banshees and stuff and wont cut down a fairy bush and all that type of thing.
 
She’s right. I’m 45 and I wouldn’t. You don’t **** with the sídhe. Not superstitious in the slightest otherwise.
My Father, who I wouldn't have regarded as superstitious, once scared the shit out of me by his reaction to a frog hopping into the house. This was regarded as an omen of death by older generation. He told me afterward that he was trying to prevent his mother, who was there at the time from seeing it. I think this mechanism drives it under the skin.
 
my friends mother is 92 and still swears by Banshees and stuff and wont cut down a fairy bush and all that type of thing.
My great-uncle Johnny was born around 1880 and came to Boston around 1905. My grandmother was not much for síscéal (fairy stories) but I got a lot from Uncle Johnny. He rarely referred to the Sí but usually said "duine miath" (good people) as he did not want to offend the sí. Apparently they are sensitive and you don't want to offend them.

As to fairy bushes, not sure if it is the same thing but once, while in the area of Creeslough up north in Donegal, I got a bit lost and found myself at a spring and next to the spring was a thorn bush (a sloe??) and the bush was covered with little slips of paper tied to the bush with ribbons. It was a bit creepy to see, like I had gone back to some pagan era. Pretty area to visit though.
 
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My great-uncle Johnny was born around 1880 and came to Boston around 1905. My grandmother was not much for síscéal (fairy stories) but I got a lot from Uncle Johnny. He rarely referred to the Sí but usually said "duine math" (good people) as he did not want to offend the sí. Apparently they are sensitive and you don't want to offend them.

As to fairy bushes, not sure if it is the same thing but once, while in the area of Creeslough up north in Donegal, I got a bit lost and found myself at a spring and next to the spring was a thorn bush (a sloe??) and the bush was covered with little slips of paper tied to the bush with ribbons. It was a bit creepy to see, like I had gone back to some pagan era. Pretty area to visit though.
That was a ‘holy’ well. There’s a rake of them in Ireland with varying degrees of weirdness. These places would have had significance in the pre-Christian era and the church co-opted them. There’s one that aspiring mothers visit when they’re trying to conceive. The trees and bushes around it are covered with baby dolls and other offerings. There’s another that has a ring of canes,crutches and other assistive devices around it. All very pagan and very well attended to this day.
 
Well he is a tad disembodied. Personally I recommend rest
Getting hanged drawn and quartered at Tyburn will do that to you.

More likely to blame this fellow....

Graham was on an epsiode of Who Do You Think You Are. A couple of his ancestors fought on the wrong side in 1798 and apparently executed a few of their Catholic neighbours just in case. And young Graham thought the neigbours didn't like him because he's fruitier than a Chimpanzee's larder.
 
didn't know about the "bog lark" bit but I was under the impression it was Irish myth/legend that in April three bad days were taken out of March to see off an old cow. odd I know? but I'm a great believer in the old country sayings.
That rang a bell. A quick Google and

According to the old story 'An tSean-Bhó Riabhach' , the old brindled cow boasted that even the rigours of March could not kill her, whereupon March borrowed three days from April and using these with redoubled fury, killed and skinned the poor old cow. Henceforth, the first three days of April traditionally bring very bad weather and are known as as Laethanta na Riabhaiche, The Reehy Days, the Borrowed or Borrowing Days, the Skinning Days, and other names.

Some people reckoned the days in the Old Style, thus Amnhhlaoibh O Súlleabháin wrote the following in 1827:

"This the 12th day of April, is the first of the three days of the old brindled cow, namely three days in which the weather of March took from the beginning of Old April.'

An old ballad tells how capricious March begged generous April for a loan and then rendered the three days awful:

The first of them was wind and wet,
The second of them was snow and sleet,
The third of them was such a freeze,
It froze the birds' claws to the trees.

In parts of Northern Ireland, the story was more elaborate with nine borrowed days instead of three. The old legend states that the blackbird, the stone-chatter and the old grey cow bid defiance to March after his days were done and that to punish their insolence, he begged of April nine of his days, three for each of them for which he repaid nine of his own:

Trí lá lomartha an loinn
Three days for fleecing the black-bird,

Three days of punishment for the stone chatter,
Trí lá sgiuthanta an chlaibhreáin

Agus trí lá na bó riabhaighte
And three days for the grey cow.

Superstitions surrounding the "borrowed days" endured well into the nineteenth century and throughout the British Isles. They were dangerous days, fraught with taboos and the spectre of bad weather. After King James I died at the tail end of March during a storm that battered the Scottish coast, a contemporary writer mourned that this would be " long after remembered as the storm of the Borrowed Days." An earlier document, titled Complaint of Scotland, laments that "the boreal blasts of the three borrowing days of March had chased the fragrant flowers of every fruit-tree far athwart the fields."

Sources:
Encyclopaedia of the Celts
The Year in Ireland by Kevin Danaher
Ulster Journal of Archaeology. 1861-2.225


The Borrowed Days - World Cultures European
 
my friends mother is 92 and still swears by Banshees and stuff and wont cut down a fairy bush and all that type of thing.
You don't mess with the Fairies. Those cúnts are nails. My Granny was mental for piseogs (superstitions and curses), fairies, the Banshee and the Devil. Were she still alive she'd be out blessing the fields on Monday evening with a bottle of holy water.
 

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