Irish general election

My favourite Irish tunes is 'The Star of the County Down'.

I have always wondered about Rosie McCann though. Was she Protestant or Catholic ?

Google says the name McCann originates in Armagh.

However Bandbridge Town on the banks of the Bann is two thirds Protestant tough.

But would a Protestant be walking around in two bare feet though. Being generally more prosperous and probably owning all the Flak and Linen mills in town.
Rosie McCann? Come on, she's obviously a papist.
 
Sure, but a lot of nasty shit happened north and south then, both sides more than willing to give their neighbours a good kicking. Does anyone seriously believe that after a UI referendum hordes of Catholic farmers would suddenly descend on protestant-owned land to drive off their occupants? Really?
I think it was all down to numbers. In the south in the twenties they were vastly outnumbered and there was a general breakdown in law and order between the disbandment of the RIC and the formation of the Garda. The Prods in the three Ulster counties in the Free State were in larger numbers.

The Catholic farmers would have a bit more of a problem descended on Protestant-owned lands in N.I. as the numbers are more even. And it would be likely the PSNI would stay intact. They would have to get any aid from the Garda in Dublin though, as opposed to the mainland in Britain like at present.

The IRA made a concerted attempt to ethnically cleanse Protestant farmers from the border areas in the seventies and eighties, as wee Arlene will testify.
 
Rosie McCann? Come on, she's obviously a papist.
Thats what I thought. She couldn't even afford shoes. Probably working in the mill for the evil Protestant land owners. Probably Anglo Irish to make it worse.

It seems she was a looker though - a sweet colleen with nut brown hair.
 
I think it was all down to numbers. In the south in the twenties they were vastly outnumbered and there was a general breakdown in law and order between the disbandment of the RIC and the formation of the Garda. The Prods in the three Ulster counties in the Free State were in larger numbers.

The Catholic farmers would have a bit more of a problem descended on Protestant-owned lands in N.I. as the numbers are more even. And it would be likely the PSNI would stay intact. They would have to get any aid from the Garda in Dublin though, as opposed to the mainland in Britain like at present.

The IRA made a concerted attempt to ethnically cleanse Protestant farmers from the border areas in the seventies and eighties, as wee Arlene will testify.
The Orange Order supposedly have a fund to buy land in Northern Ireland. I've heard that they have bought land that was once the property of single male Unionists around the border, shot by the Provo's.
 
Thats what I thought. She couldn't even afford shoes. Probably working in the mill for the evil Protestant land owners. Probably Anglo Irish to make it worse.

It seems she was a looker though - a sweet colleen with nut brown hair.
The fact that she's the prettiest girl in the entire county is the most obvious clue that she must be a Catholic ;););)

(How do you know ET is a protestant? Cos he looks like one :p)
 

Dredd

LE
I am not disagreeing with you. Down south they simply use Irish as a stick with which to hit the Brits, they don't speak it any more than the people of Rome speak Latin. I absolutly hate it when the BBC refer to the Irish Prime Minister as the Taoiseach when the job is Prime Minister.

Cardiff has more Cantonese speakers than Welsh speakers but everything has to be in frigging Welsh
Absolutely the same in Scotland - the current Big Cooncil "government" is pushing Gaelic for all it is worth, because . . . well, it's not because of a high percentage of the population speak it. In fact, it was 1.1% at the last census.


So the only conclusion is that it is being done to promote the image that we are not English. Good to know that with a failing health service, failing educational system, severe budgetary issues for everything from road maintenance to policing, we continue to focus on important stuff like making sure all the bobby cars are dual language from Jedburgh to Sumburgh. That's a good use of public funds.
 
The vast majority of the English either don't want NI, or don't care. The majority of the Irish don't want NI to join the ROI.

Nothing will change for a while yet, no-one really wants NI, and they are quite happy sucking on the teat of the rUK.
except, the ROI don’t get a choice, they are run directly and told what to think and do by Brussels, and Brussels will it.
 
Absolutely the same in Scotland - the current Big Cooncil "government" is pushing Gaelic for all it is worth, because . . . well, it's not because of a high percentage of the population speak it. In fact, it was 1.1% at the last census.


So the only conclusion is that it is being done to promote the image that we are not English. Good to know that with a failing health service, failing educational system, severe budgetary issues for everything from road maintenance to policing, we continue to focus on important stuff like making sure all the bobby cars are dual language from Jedburgh to Sumburgh. That's a good use of public funds.
It's not even that, I mean there's nothing wrong with promoting and preserving the Gaelic language but it's the pretence that it's a Scottish national language. It isn't, it's the language of the Highlands, it was never spoken in the lowlands. It's a bit like pretending that Cornish or a Cumbrian dialect is the national language of all England.
 

Dredd

LE
It's not even that, I mean there's nothing wrong with promoting and preserving the Gaelic language but it's the pretence that it's a Scottish national language. It isn't, it's the language of the Highlands, it was never spoken in the lowlands. It's a bit like pretending that Cornish or a Cumbrian dialect is the national language of all England.
As I say, it is only being promoted because it graphically differentiates "us" from "them".

It's quaint for the tourists, and of no value in any way to the locals. The purpose is clear - segregation. But it back-fires when it is subconsciously making people feel different in their own locality, for exactly the reason you point out. It was only really in the Highlands and Islands that it was spoken. To an overwhelming proportion of the population, it may as well be Aramaic for all the sense they get from it.
 
It's not even that, I mean there's nothing wrong with promoting and preserving the Gaelic language but it's the pretence that it's a Scottish national language. It isn't, it's the language of the Highlands, it was never spoken in the lowlands. It's a bit like pretending that Cornish or a Cumbrian dialect is the national language of all England.
Oh come on. A basic piece of research would have told you that Scottish Gaelic was spoken at one time all over Scotland with the exception of the Borders, and arguably (there is some discussion about it) the NE corner of Caithness.
Stop just repeating myths.
 
As I say, it is only being promoted because it graphically differentiates "us" from "them".

It's quaint for the tourists, and of no value in any way to the locals. The purpose is clear - segregation. But it back-fires when it is subconsciously making people feel different in their own locality, for exactly the reason you point out. It was only really in the Highlands and Islands that it was spoken. To an overwhelming proportion of the population, it may as well be Aramaic for all the sense they get from it.
As I said before, untrue. Do some basic research on the Lowland Gaelic dialects spoken in Galloway and Ayrshire.
I agree with your point that few people speak it now, but you undermine your argument by repeating untruths.
 
The guy that partook in the recent polling data, that the Belfast Telegraph posted yesterday, is getting hammered on his personal facebook page by Republicans.
Peter Shirlow you all him.

Republicans, they don't like it up em.
 
Should a united Ireland happen I think we would have a large number of hard line Orangemen arrive in mainland UK? might have an interesting effect in places like Liverpool and Glasgow?
 
Should a united Ireland happen I think we would have a large number of hard line Orangemen arrive in mainland UK? might have an interesting effect in places like Liverpool and Glasgow?
I don't know about Liverpool, but in parts of Glasgow and North Ayrshire they wouldn't be thought of as being particularly hard line.
 
My favourite Irish tunes is 'The Star of the County Down'.

I have always wondered about Rosie McCann though. Was she Protestant or Catholic ?

Google says the name McCann originates in Armagh.

However Bandbridge Town on the banks of the Bann is two thirds Protestant tough.

But would a Protestant be walking around in two bare feet though. Being generally more prosperous and probably owning all the Flak and Linen mills in town.
Only so many mills to go around.

More seriously, better off on average doesn't mean the entire group is "rich".
 
The guy that partook in the recent polling data, that the Belfast Telegraph posted yesterday, is getting hammered on his personal facebook page by Republicans.
Peter Shirlow you all him.

Republicans, they don't like it up em.

Embrace your future!

PL42520441BRITAIN_IRELAND_.jpg
 
I'm made of an Orange suit of teflon.. That shit just doesn't bother me.

I'm confident and resolute around my kids future in the United Kingdom of GB and NI.

Now I've things to do, I'll leave you to study for your Wikipedia PHD.
 

Dredd

LE
As I said before, untrue. Do some basic research on the Lowland Gaelic dialects spoken in Galloway and Ayrshire.
I agree with your point that few people speak it now, but you undermine your argument by repeating untruths.
Stop attempting revisionist history by making it sound as if it was more than it was. The sources I can see that spout this are heavily Nationalist and to be honest, I wouldn't believe them if they told me the time while standing under the clock display at Aberdeen Train Station without having it verified from 3 different sources.

It seems to be based upon the preponderance of place names having a Gaelic origin in places like Bo'ness. This conveniently ignores the heavy Nordic influence that a lot of places have with their place names too, so following that reasoning it would suggest that the secondary language was Danish, and English (or Scots) was third. Still ahead of Latin right enough.

The biggest laugh though is that this is all centred around the 12th century. That was almost a thousand years ago. If Gaelic was really so prevalent (or indeed, the primary language as you claim) there will be a large body of written works available and historical records of the time would have been in that language as well. I am sure you can point to the public records offices where we sceptics can view them and finally admit that we were mistaken in our belief that Gaelic has been an irrelevancy for the vast bulk of the Scottish people for centuries.

This clinging to the distant past mentality of the Scots is almost embarrassing. For some, the Battle of Bannockburn is still recent history in their minds and they simply will not let it go and put it into the context it should be, which explains why certain sections of the populace are just as fixated on the Battle of the Boyne and determined to keep it fresh after all this time.

As an example of where this gubbins is being peddled, look here:


I'll give it credit for at least admitting this though:

Lowland Gaelic was never adequately recorded so it is impossible to know how it differed from the Scottish Gaelic dialects which are still spoken
 
Stop attempting revisionist history by making it sound as if it was more than it was. The sources I can see that spout this are heavily Nationalist and to be honest, I wouldn't believe them if they told me the time while standing under the clock display at Aberdeen Train Station without having it verified from 3 different sources.

It seems to be based upon the preponderance of place names having a Gaelic origin in places like Bo'ness. This conveniently ignores the heavy Nordic influence that a lot of places have with their place names too, so following that reasoning it would suggest that the secondary language was Danish, and English (or Scots) was third. Still ahead of Latin right enough.

The biggest laugh though is that this is all centred around the 12th century. That was almost a thousand years ago. If Gaelic was really so prevalent (or indeed, the primary language as you claim) there will be a large body of written works available and historical records of the time would have been in that language as well. I am sure you can point to the public records offices where we sceptics can view them and finally admit that we were mistaken in our belief that Gaelic has been an irrelevancy for the vast bulk of the Scottish people for centuries.

This clinging to the distant past mentality of the Scots is almost embarrassing. For some, the Battle of Bannockburn is still recent history in their minds and they simply will not let it go and put it into the context it should be, which explains why certain sections of the populace are just as fixated on the Battle of the Boyne and determined to keep it fresh after all this time.

As an example of where this gubbins is being peddled, look here:


I'll give it credit for at least admitting this though:
Yes, it was a long time ago. The sources I have read on this are from linguistics academics, nothing to do with politics. If you still doubt that they spoke Gaelic at one point in Aberdeenshire, do some research on the Book of Deer. If you doubt that they spoke Gaelic in Galloway and Ayrshire, there are plenty of academic sources that describe it there also.

I note with high amusement the subtle movement of goalpost from “Gaelic was never spoken outside of the Western Isles and Highlands” to “Gaelic has been an irrelevancy for the vast bulk of the Scottish people for centuries“.
A complete invocation of the reversocycle but without the grace to admIt that your original statement was wrong.
 

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