Ireland: minted

#1
WTF?

The Irish Times said:
The 2005 Human Development Report, published by the UN Development Programme yesterday, found Irish people to be the second wealthiest in the world, with a GDP per head of $37,738 (€30,384).
Time they were tapped for some cash!
 
#2
Well they've had years of playing the Irish/N. Irish border, claiming off the EU and spend next to nothing on their armed forces, not to mention sending most of their youth away to the US to earn a fortune before returning to retire in the home country. They should be rolling in it if you ask me.
 
#3
An awful lot of EU money found its way to the RoI in the 1990s which turned around the economy, but I'm surprised that they're number 2 on the list, nonetheless.
 
#4
I read somewhere today, may have been Metro, that the largest ammount of "foreigners" living in the UK today were born in ROI, 469,000'ish, after this was India at around 445,000

Clucking bell
 
#5
Dr_Evil said:
WTF?

The Irish Times said:
The 2005 Human Development Report, published by the UN Development Programme yesterday, found Irish people to be the second wealthiest in the world, with a GDP per head of $37,738 (€30,384).
Time they were tapped for some cash!
Be aware, the Irish Times are a smug bunch of utra liberal "we are great whay hey" Paddys. Ireland is a very different country today than what it was ten or fifteen years ago. Paddys these days are a bunch of jumped up latte yuppies. Or am I being cynical about my fellow Passport holders?
 
#6
Well, the 'clever' ones go to the US and either 'crash & burn' never to return or come back rich. The thick ones who need work make it across the Irish Sea and claim of the UK State so remove a great burden from the Irish Government. Hey, it's all saving their country money so they sneek up the wealth tables that way.
 
#7
Another point is that anyone visiting the RoI is a tourist. Nobody really emmigrates there to find work do they so it's one way traffic and a one way flow of money.
 
#8
Plant-Pilot said:
Well, the 'clever' ones go to the US and either 'crash & burn' never to return or come back rich. The thick ones who need work make it across the Irish Sea and claim of the UK State so remove a great burden from the Irish Government. Hey, it's all saving their country money so they sneek up the wealth tables that way.
I will be the first to say that unfortunatley some Pikeys are issued with Irish Passports. Building roads and working on the sites may still be where some of them go but now most coming over here are graduates and are recruited by UK companies. Anyway dossers can claim more welfare in Ireland than here, I doubt they claim here out of a sense of patriotic duty.

Personally I didnt want to go to the states
 
#9
Plant-Pilot said:
Another point is that anyone visiting the RoI is a tourist. Nobody really emmigrates there to find work do they so it's one way traffic and a one way flow of money.

?????
 
#10
Plant-Pilot said:
Another point is that anyone visiting the RoI is a tourist. Nobody really emmigrates there to find work do they so it's one way traffic and a one way flow of money.
Have you actually ever stepped foot in Rep of Ireland? Obviously you haven't. My parent's business is comprised of over 60% people who have come to Ireland to work. So, I think that has blown your observation out of the water.

Ireland may be wealthy (I see it myself when I pop back over on leave twice a year or so) and it has changed remarkably since the mid-90's but everything is fcuking expensive. I think it says a lot that you can buy an Ireland rugby jersey cheaper in the UK than in Ireland.

Cars are mega expensive and insurance is a joke. Last time I was at home, I rang an insurance company to get a quote (to see whether my sister in law was a moaning bitch or not) and the cheapest quote I could get was treble what I pay in the UK! (I stand by my claims about my sis in law though)

Ireland does need to invest in its Armed Forces as they are seriously underequipped and I do believe Ireland is the only country in the Western World that does not have a Fighter Sqn however in all honestly it would be a bit pointless having a Fighter sqn. It does need to invest in its Navy and increase the amount of offensive armour (not a tankie so I don't care about pickups from them) from 12 Scorpions to something with a bit more ummpph if it is going to contribute fully to this new fangled EURFOR.
 
#11
I was wondering how long it would be before someone bit.
 
#12
I think this fact omits the reality that only the Dublin region has seriously benefitted from the Celtic Tiger years. From what I can tell, a number of factors kindled the boom- money from Europe (spent on infrastructure); the McSharry cuts in 1987 (along with FG's "Tallaght Strategy") which saved the country from IMF intervention; low corporate taxation (which attracted large, mainly American, multinationals) and the fact that the US went into a boom around 1995-6.

Ireland's population is on the increase due to Irish abroad returning home and economic migrants (mainly from Eastern Europe) moving into the country. But then there are people leaving Ireland because it has gotten too expensive (!)
 
#13
stameen_s said:
I think this fact omits the reality that only the Dublin region has seriously benefitted from the Celtic Tiger years. From what I can tell, a number of factors kindled the boom- money from Europe (spent on infrastructure); the McSharry cuts in 1987 (along with FG's "Tallaght Strategy") which saved the country from IMF intervention; low corporate taxation (which attracted large, mainly American, multinationals) and the fact that the US went into a boom around 1995-6.

Ireland's population is on the increase due to Irish abroad returning home and economic migrants (mainly from Eastern Europe) moving into the country. But then there are people leaving Ireland because it has gotten too expensive (!)
B0llocks. My dad's company (Civ eng) sent him to Galway to get in on some of the fat infrastructure plans. They were building like crazy there too. All the farmers in Connaught have built themselves new houses and rent out (at top dollar) the olde worlde, rustic farmhouses to the tourists. what's more,you're hard pressed to find a car there more than three years old. The funny thing is that since wage inflation is rampant a lot of the bog trotters do less work and still receive the same income. Fcuk-all happens in Galway before 1030 and the place shuts down (apart from the pubs and the track) for around 14 days in the summer for Race Week.

I agree with the migration point however, Galway town center is full of the East European Gyppos.
 
#14
crabtastic said:
stameen_s said:
I think this fact omits the reality that only the Dublin region has seriously benefitted from the Celtic Tiger years. From what I can tell, a number of factors kindled the boom- money from Europe (spent on infrastructure); the McSharry cuts in 1987 (along with FG's "Tallaght Strategy") which saved the country from IMF intervention; low corporate taxation (which attracted large, mainly American, multinationals) and the fact that the US went into a boom around 1995-6.

Ireland's population is on the increase due to Irish abroad returning home and economic migrants (mainly from Eastern Europe) moving into the country. But then there are people leaving Ireland because it has gotten too expensive (!)
B0llocks. My dad's company (Civ eng) sent him to Galway to get in on some of the fat infrastructure plans. They were building like crazy there too. All the farmers in Connaught have built themselves new houses and rent out (at top dollar) the olde worlde, rustic farmhouses to the tourists. what's more,you're hard pressed to find a car there more than three years old. The funny thing is that since wage inflation is rampant a lot of the bog trotters do less work and still receive the same income. Fcuk-all happens in Galway before 1030 and the place shuts down (apart from the pubs and the track) for around 14 days in the summer for Race Week.

I agree with the migration point however, Galway town center is full of the East European Gyppos.
All likely to change in the near future however. The RoI's attractiveness from a business perspective is fast diminishing from the discussions I've had with business contacts & colleagues - many are now actively looking to re-locate to lower cost centres in Eastern Europe and Asia. Asia is the key location - everybody wants a piece of China and India and the overall tax incentives/holidays (not just corp tax) the governments out here are offering are just going to pull in more industry from the EU, US etc. Bottom line is that the RoI should enjoy what it has while it has it - but don't expect it too last much longer.

lancslad
 
#15
I suspect the wealth distribution is skewed in Dublin's favour - Easter this year a study was published which showed Donegal was the poorest county, with an average annual income per head of about £7000.

Won't stop me setting up business in Ireland in a couple of years though......... I hope the population stays at 4 million! I like it the way it is.
 
#16
Hardly surprising. They're all over here: spongeing benefit, paying bugger all tax (either income, road or council) and nicking others' stuff. They do a lovely driveway though... not! Cnuts.
 
#17
I hope thats an attempt at a bite BF, as I would like to credit you with slighty more than a Sun readers intellect.
 
#18
Vonshot said:
Paddys these days are a bunch of jumped up latte yuppies. Or am I being cynical about my fellow Passport holders?
Generally speaking they are, and no you are not being cynical.

The Celtic Tiger did not benefit the entire country, although it was not solely confined to the Dublin area (where a third of the population live anyway). True, the other major cities and towns did benefit, but I challenge anyone here to travel through the Midlands and the border counties and they will be hard put to find any evidence of the Celtic Tiger. Places such as Longford, Cavan, Donegal, Leitrim, the Midlands as whole, and any small town or village in rural Ireland are dying on their feet. In certain places the suicide rate among young males has gone through the roof. These are places of no hope and no opportunity. They are stuck in some 1970s hell-hole of despair. Those with any ambition either choose to leave or do so because they have no option. It is still the case that vast areas of rural Ireland are simply not served with educational and health facilities - look at the distances many cancer patients and university students have to travel to avail of basic amenities. Such places as Donegal still have no rail link with the rest of the country, and where there is one, people are forced to commute ridiculous distances by bus to use a train service more fitted to Albania. Fewer people are certainly poorer and forced to emigrate than before, but I wonder at the claim that the Republic currently has one of the best standards of living. The prices we pay for basic everyday - let alone luxury - goods and services are quite simply extortionate, and what's worse they are often sub-standard. House prices are through the stratosphere, which is forcing people to look abroad or flee the major cities, which is placing a burden on already over-stretched or non-existent services and facilities. Government pressure over the past number of years has seen a number of the country's major universities rid themselves of what are deemed 'less productive' subjects, which has led to the 'amalgamation' (and outright disbandment) of many faculties and departments, such as history, classics, literature etc. as the arts and humanities are viewed by the cretins who govern us as contributing nothing to 'Ireland Inc.' For example, Trinity College Dublin has undergone 'restructuring', which has seen the College go from 80 departments to 18. It is no coincidence that all of the country's major third level institutions are currently headed by those of a technical/scientific/or medical background. This will see Ireland soon become a nation of cappuccino-quaffing philistines.
 
#19
gallowglass said:
Vonshot said:
Paddys these days are a bunch of jumped up latte yuppies. Or am I being cynical about my fellow Passport holders?
Generally speaking they are, and no you are not being cynical.

The Celtic Tiger did not benefit the entire country, although it was not solely confined to the Dublin area (where a third of the population live anyway). True, the other major cities and towns did benefit, but I challenge anyone here to travel through the Midlands and the border counties and they will be hard put to find any evidence of the Celtic Tiger. Places such as Longford, Cavan, Donegal, Leitrim, the Midlands as whole, and any small town or village in rural Ireland are dying on their feet. In certain places the suicide rate among young males has gone through the roof. These are places of no hope and no opportunity. They are stuck in some 1970s hell-hole of despair. Those with any ambition either choose to leave or do so because they have no option. It is still the case that vast areas of rural Ireland are simply not served with educational and health facilities - look at the distances many cancer patients and university students have to travel to avail of basic amenities. Such places as Donegal still have no rail link with the rest of the country, and where there is one, people are forced to commute ridiculous distances by bus to use a train service more fitted to Albania. Fewer people are certainly poorer and forced to emigrate than before, but I wonder at the claim that the Republic currently has one of the best standards of living. The prices we pay for basic everyday - let alone luxury - goods and services are quite simply extortionate, and what's worse they are often sub-standard. House prices are through the stratosphere, which is forcing people to look abroad or flee the major cities, which is placing a burden on already over-stretched or non-existent services and facilities. Government pressure over the past number of years has seen a number of the country's major universities rid themselves of what are deemed 'less productive' subjects, which has led to the 'amalgamation' (and outright disbandment) of many faculties and departments, such as history, classics, literature etc. as the arts and humanities are viewed by the cretins who govern us as contributing nothing to 'Ireland Inc.' For example, Trinity College Dublin has undergone 'restructuring', which has seen the College go from 80 departments to 18. It is no coincidence that all of the country's major third level institutions are currently headed by those of a technical/scientific/or medical background. This will see Ireland soon become a nation of cappuccino-quaffing philistines.
Hear Hear, the smugness and faux sophistication portrayed by Dubliners is sickening, they are either like this or extreme chavs. I dont blame anyone for leaving Dublin, the midlands or anywhere. I always thought the class system was much more pronounced in Ireland than in Blighty
 
#20
Vonshot said:
Hear Hear, the smugness and faux sophistication portrayed by Dubliners is sickening, they are either like this or extreme chavs. I dont blame anyone for leaving Dublin, the midlands or anywhere. I always thought the class system was much more pronounced in Ireland than in Blighty
Quite so. A point which those who tend to dismiss Ireland as a land of 'priests, peasants, and pixies' would do well to bear in mind.

Particularly in Dublin, there is a most upsetting tendency towards chaviness, even amongst the so-called D4 brigade - an interesting species - 'Irish names' straight out of myth-history and English surnames; spend their entire lives talking to the same group of people about the same rubbish. Laughingly regard themsleves as upper-class because they 'have stuff', but at the back of their tiny minds is the fear that someone will discover that their grandparents were goat-herders or whatnot. 'Study' Commerce at UCD or BESS (Business, Economics, and Social Studies) at Trinity from where they become accountants (yawn) or stockbrokers and swan around in badly-cut overpriced suits. They will have met their future spouse whilst at university - these will be totally unsuitable but they will marry nonetheless, as they think it's expected of them and they want to 'know what it's like' (an almost total absence of imagination is another hallmark). By the time they are 35 they hate their job, life, spouse, and children and have either started an affair or drug use (or both) - infidelity is a given, suicide a likelihood. Because they are cultural and intellectual cretins, they are incapable of independent thought and so throw money at any perceived problem. Naturally, they vote Fianna Fáil, 'because everyone does'. They are left-leaning liberals, because this is what Michael Moore/Gerry Ryan/Robert Fisk/insert RTÉ-approved media darling here says.
 

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