Ireland’s Vanishing Triangle - missing women in 1990s

De valera ,archbishop mcquaid and the garda completely ran the country and were answerable to no one at the time ,evil cnuts the lot of them and the mother and babies home in tuam are only
The tip of the iceberg. Talk to any Irish country person over seventy and you'll get your eyes opened. The Irish are like the Japanese in so much as they rewrite history to suit..and the only problems they ever had was caused by the British. If it wasn't for the Georgians Dublin would still be bog.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
Because those 8 aren’t thought to linked where are some of them which are possibly linked are relatively close together
More a thought on the conspiraloon theory than anything else, if I'm honest.
 
My gran was Irish and I can tell you that quite a number of Irish girls disappeared simply to get away from a life of drudgery. It's been going on since the 1920s as far as I know. One of her extended family did just that in the 1950s walking out from a farm in Sligo one day. She turned up 20-odd years later in Liverpool [long story] and had been working on a cruise liner out of Cork IIRC.

Her reason for leaving was that she hated living on an isolated farm with minimal creature comforts, being treated as a slave by her father, getting up at 5am 7 days a week to look after the cows and being expected to get married to some potato head from the next farm and never getting further from home than the market at Enniskillen.

As far as I'm aware, she never went back to Sligo and my gran was the only member of the family she had seen since she walked out, and that only by chance.
Fxxking hell, I'd have sent her the bus fare after reading that.

I'm sure there are countless women who married for the wrong reasons, then were tied to a home once a child, or 4, were produced, and then found themselves in the autumn of their lives looking back with regrets.
 
Fxxking hell, I'd have sent her the bus fare after reading that.

I'm sure there are countless women who married for the wrong reasons, then were tied to a home once a child, or 4, were produced, and then found themselves in the autumn of their lives looking back with regrets.
It wasn't just rural Ireland, there were (are) plenty of women leading lives of quiet, mind-numbing desperation in Chipping Norton or Hemel Hempstead.

The main job of most suburban GPs in the UK is handing out ever greater doses of anti-depressants to housewives to go along with their mid-morning sherries.
 
My gran was Irish and I can tell you that quite a number of Irish girls disappeared simply to get away from a life of drudgery. It's been going on since the 1920s as far as I know. One of her extended family did just that in the 1950s walking out from a farm in Sligo one day. She turned up 20-odd years later in Liverpool [long story] and had been working on a cruise liner out of Cork IIRC.

Her reason for leaving was that she hated living on an isolated farm with minimal creature comforts, being treated as a slave by her father, getting up at 5am 7 days a week to look after the cows and being expected to get married to some potato head from the next farm and never getting further from home than the market at Enniskillen.

What an ungrateful bitch.
 
There are currently >60 women listed as missing in Ireland.

some I’m sure don’t want to be found, some I’m sure will have had accidents and died, some will have committed suicide and no doubt some have been murdered. Most people are murdered by someone they know (but not exclusively). The same can be said for any society

Two be sure.
 
thanks all anyhow here’s a random question (well for those who wear green berets and graduates of Ashford or now Chicksands) could any of these cases have connection to the IRA ?

cheers
No more than similar cases in GB being the work of NF or C18. Why would they be?
 
There is a number of you tube clips about this


Is that an accurate representation of the triangle? Given its location it seems to be akin to the famous Home Counties vanishing circle.

Quite part from that, I like the use of Met coppers instead of actually finding a picture of a Garda or two. Also the DUKW in the first few seconds is quite distracting.
 
My gran was Irish and I can tell you that quite a number of Irish girls disappeared simply to get away from a life of drudgery. It's been going on since the 1920s as far as I know. One of her extended family did just that in the 1950s walking out from a farm in Sligo one day. She turned up 20-odd years later in Liverpool [long story] and had been working on a cruise liner out of Cork IIRC.

Her reason for leaving was that she hated living on an isolated farm with minimal creature comforts, being treated as a slave by her father, getting up at 5am 7 days a week to look after the cows and being expected to get married to some potato head from the next farm and never getting further from home than the market at Enniskillen.

As far as I'm aware, she never went back to Sligo and my gran was the only member of the family she had seen since she walked out, and that only by chance.
As a corollary I was recently engaged in social media discussion about the motivations for young men wanting to enlist during the Great War. In essence, modern observers could not understand why young men volunteered for the army especially after the losses of 1914 and 1915 became public knowledge. I think we tend to forget that for vast majority of the population, life was never-ending drudgery: working on the farm, down the mine, in a mill, in a shop or in an office - 12 hours a day, six days a week spent doing mind numbingly tedious work. Sunday was expected to be at church, and that was it. The 40 hour week was still some twenty years away. Holiday travel or travel for pleasure was unknown, again for most of the population. Imagine then, the opportunity to visit exciting and exotic parts of the world, with your mates, being paid regularly, being fed regular meals and playing with guns. Who wouldn't want to volunteer?

There are many recorded cases of soldiers returning from the First and Second World Wars and not wanting to return to their pre-war occupations. This also applied to many women who had the new freedoms of earning a wage in munitions factories or doing jobs normally reserved for men, and not wanting to return to being in domestic service in the home and expecting to get pregnant on a regular basis. I am sure that many people simply vanished from their previous life.
 
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I had an Irish grandmother. Lived in Pembroke with grandad, an cornish ex tin mine engineer who had worked in the dockyard. Not even sure they were married. Her background was a little murky with a few vague references to a farm in Limerick. I think now I have a better understanding of her.
 
As a corollary I was recently engaged in social media discussion about the motivations for young men wanting to enlist during the Great War. In essence, modern observers could not understand why young men volunteered for the army especially after the losses of 1914 and 1915 became public knowledge. I think we tend to forget that for vast majority of the population, life was never-ending drudgery: working on the farm, down the mine, in a mill, in a shop or in an office - 12 hours a day, six days a week spent doing mind numbingly tedious work. Sunday was expected to be at church, and that was it. The 40 hour week was still some twenty years away. Holiday travel or travel for pleasure was unknown, again for most of the population. Imagine then, the opportunity to visit exciting and exotic parts of the world, with your mates, being paid regularly, being fed regular meals and playing with guns. Who wouldn't want to volunteer?

There are many recorded cases of soldiers returning from the First and Second World Wars and not wanting to return to their pre-war occupations. This also applied to many women who had the new freedoms of earning a wage in munitions factories or doing jobs normally reserved for men, and not wanting to return to being in domestic service in the home and expecting to get pregnant on a regular basis. I am sure that many people simply vanished from their previous life.
From a different but still relevant perspective, I was out one night in a nightclub in Jakarta. Now I say nightclub but it was really just a huge upmarket brothel, I was with a local Indian businessman who ran several big textile factories and an American, a customer.

It was before the MeToo phenomenon and in Asia no one thought it odd to conduct business in such an environment. On the stage a band played and in between sessions sexy dancers came on. Along the sides were rows and rows of seating on which were reclining or sitting or eating or playing with their phones or fixing their make-up dozens of attractive and very bored looking young women waiting to be picked by a client.

Our American colleague, not perhaps acclimatised to Asia, expressed shock at this, he had never seen anything like it and he immediately expounded on how awful it must be for these young women to take such work, how economically deprived they must be, what dreadful circumstances had forced them into this work.

The Indian gentleman, perhaps more cynical, said to him "I run textile factories, I employ hundreds of seamstresses. I pay well, my factories are inspected by western companies to ensure they meet modern welfare standards, the work is not hard, it's regular, 9-5 , Monday to Friday, but it's mind-numbingly boring. My biggest problem is retaining staff, I barely have them trained up and they leave for what they believe is more glamorous work".

He then pointed the girls along the walls, "They are exactly the sort of people I could use, healthy, smart young women, but they don't get to sit around my factory all evening smoking and playing with their handphones. So I'll tell you what, I know the manager here, I will get his permission, why don't you go around all of those girls, offering them jobs in my factory, you can tell them the wages they can earn, tell them the work they will be expected to do, and I will give you $100 for every girl you recruit. Come back and tell me how you get on with these desperate women."

The American guy didn't take up the challenge, it's a pity, as it would have been interesting to see how he got on.
 
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