Iraq. Militants take back Mosul, Tikrit and march on Baghdad

184461

On ROPS
On ROPs
How curious, then, that the image you post lauding the might of your Russian Air Force looks so very similar to an image from 2011. The caption for that suggests it's a convoy of 19 fuel trucks heading to AFG from PAK: it had been stopped and torched by 'unknown gunmen'. The audience is provided by the drivers of said trucks.

Gunmen set NATO tankers ablaze in Pakistan

But you already knew that. Didn't you.
Curious?
It's a tanker and it's burning.
What more do you want?

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Fuel/oil burns when ignited and everything gets melted.

Why would I know or care that you think this is from 2011?
It says it's from a Ru a/s where I'm sitting but that's irrelevant.
Your comment isalso irrelevant.
 
Curious?
It's a tanker and it's burning.
What more do you want?

View attachment 331235 View attachment 331236

Fuel/oil burns when ignited and everything gets melted.

Why would I know or care that you think this is from 2011?
It says it's from a Ru a/s where I'm sitting but that's irrelevant.
Your comment isalso irrelevant.
You are above accuracy and relevance, then, preferring to rely on obfuscation, deceit and outright lies to lend a modicum of support to your weak position?
 
You're right they're thousands of miles apart and radiation doesn't travel in dust-form from DU either.
BBC News | Sci/Tech | Depleted uranium 'threatens Balkan cancer epidemic'

View attachment 331229

Armoured tankers? That's not plausible in reality.
Tankers if/when hit with HE/sabot or ignited with IED will burn like buggery, the heat is massively intense and melts everything.
The engine block is the least of your worries as the cab and everything will be melted and U/S forever more.

View attachment 331233




The cover for US DU usage in that instance was just a..... cover, and a badly constructed one at that.
No , I am quite right. Gaza, Syria and Iraq ARE in different countries.
The crap argument you are using is an example of the 'correlation does not equal causation.' fallacy.
You say-There are birth defects in places where the US used DU ammunition. Ergo, defects are caused by Evil Yankee DU.
The problem is that this, is to put it mildly, crap.
It requires Evil Yankee DU (EYDU) to behave in ways different to Standard DU, a material used in Russian munitions and in aircraft and other industrial processes.
EYDU must be able to fly about in duststorms, causing birth defects only in places where EYDU has been used.
However, let us consider that hotspot of EYDU use, Kuwait, where the Iraqi army was systematically brassed up with everything known to man. Does Kuwait have an epidemic of birth defects?
No.
So, does EYDU have a magic ability to avoid American allies?
No.
Secondly, does EYDU cause an epidemic of birth defects in the Balkans?
Answer-no.
So, did EYDU pixie dust cause a surge in birth defects as it blows around in the wind, which by now will have spread it all across the world?
No.
Does EYDU behave differently to all the other sources of Uranium from mining, aviation, the nuclear industry and the thousands of rounds expended in training by Russians, Chinese and other Nations?
No.

Uranium is a chemical toxin (something Russians know all about, the murdering scum), a heavy metal toxin and generally bad news.
It is not magic.
On the other hand, living in a country that is chronically polluted with a huge range of other toxins is very likely to cause birth defects.
 
You are above accuracy and relevance, then, preferring to rely on obfuscation, deceit and outright lies to lend a modicum of support to your weak position?
He is a troll. Of course he does.
Like the Wicked Witch of the West, with her water allergy, when truth is poured over him, he dissolves screaming.
 
Some information on who is ponying up for the reconstruction of Sunni Iraq and how much:

The United Arab Emirates is to give $50m (£36m) to help rebuild a landmark mosque in the Iraqi city of Mosul blown up by Islamic State militants.

Mosul's landmark mosque to be rebuilt

People can't eat mosques.
 
Some information on who is ponying up for the reconstruction of Sunni Iraq and how much:

The United Arab Emirates is to give $50m (£36m) to help rebuild a landmark mosque in the Iraqi city of Mosul blown up by Islamic State militants.

Mosul's landmark mosque to be rebuilt

People can't eat mosques.
To be fair though, the story is just about the mosque and doesn't tell us if there is any other aid being provided for the reconstruction of the city in general. Mosul was extensively damaged by air strikes (see previous posts for photographs of the bomb damage) and it will take many years to rebuild.
 
US-led coalition signals end of major operations against Islamic...
End of major Ops by the coalition against IS in Iraq. They'll now be moving “from supporting and enabling combat operations to the training and development of self-sufficient Iraqi security-related capabilities”
The U.S.-led coalition signalled on Monday the end of major combat operations against Islamic State in Iraq by announcing the “deactivation” of its land forces command headquarters.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared victory over the Islamic State in December, five months after his forces recaptured the country’s second city Mosul in a protracted battle with the jihadist militants.

Islamic State, however, continues to carry out bombings, assassinations and ambushes in different areas of Iraq, and remains active in neighbouring Syria.

In a statement, the U.S.-led coalition said its relationship with the Iraqi armed forces would evolve “from supporting and enabling combat operations to the training and development of self-sufficient Iraqi security-related capabilities”.
CJFLCC HQ (why did spell check want to make that flaccid? :) ) deactivated today:
In a statement, the U.S.-led coalition said its relationship with the Iraqi armed forces would evolve “from supporting and enabling combat operations to the training and development of self-sufficient Iraqi security-related capabilities”.

“The Combined Joint Forces Land Component Command Headquarters was deactivated today at a ceremony in Baghdad, signifying the end of major combat operations against ISIS(Islamic State) in Iraq and acknowledging the changing composition and responsibilities of the coalition.”

Brett Mc Gurk, the U.S. envoy to the coalition, tweeted: “From Falluja to Tikrit, Baiji, Ramadi, Sinjar, Mosul and points in between, our coalition has been proud to stand beside Iraqi forces and (Kurdish) Peshmerga as they liberated their country and 4.5 million fellow citizens from ISIS.”
Hoping to avoid the 2011 withdrawal and return, they're looking at a longer term 'train and advise' strategy:
NATO nations agreed in February to a bigger “train-and-advise” mission in Iraq as part of a broader international effort to help rebuild the country from more than a decade of war as combat operations wind down.

The United States wants to avoid a repeat of its 2011 withdrawal from Iraq and the subsequent rise of Islamic State as security unravelled.

“The lesson learnt from Iraq (is that) it is dangerous to leave too early because we may be forced back into combat operations,” NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said in February.
 
Exclusive - Iraq used Baghdadi aide's phone to capture Islamic...
No wonder Turkey, Iran and Russia want to stop the Telegram app in their countries:
Iraqi agents are holding a top aide to Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, and used an app on his mobile phone to lure four commanders from the group into a trap, a security advisor to the Iraqi government said on Thursday.

Ismail al-Eithawi, who also uses the alias Abu Zaid al-Iraqi, was captured in February in Turkey by Turkish authorities and handed over to Iraqi agents, Iraqi security advisor Hisham al-Hashimi told Reuters on Thursday.

Hashimi described Eithawi as a direct aide to Islamic State leader Baghdadi, responsible for funds transfers to the group’s bank accounts in different countries.

Iraqi agents used the Telegram messaging app on Eithawi’s mobile phone to lure other Islamic State commanders to cross the border from Syria into Iraq, where they were captured, Hashimi said. Those held include Saddam Jamal, a Syrian who served as the group’s governor of Syria’s eastern Euphrates region.
They clearly believe Baghdadi is still at large and contrary to previous reports is alive:
Hashimi described Eithawi and Jamal as the two most senior Islamic State figures ever to be captured alive. The capture of all five was announced on Iraqi state TV on Wednesday.

Hashimi said the operation was carried out in cooperation with U.S. forces, part of an American-led coalition fighting against Islamic State on both sides of the Iraqi-Syrian border.

Following Eithawi’s capture, Iraqi and American intelligence agents were able to uncover bank accounts used by the group and also secret communication codes he used, Hashimi said.

Apart from Eithawi and Jamal, the operation captured three field commanders: Syrian Mohamed al-Qadeer and two Iraqis, Omar al-Karbouli and Essam al-Zawbai, Hashimi said.

“The noose is tightening around him,” Hashimi said, referring to Baghdadi, whose real name is Ibrahim al-Samarrai.
 
Some information on who is ponying up for the reconstruction of Sunni Iraq and how much:

The United Arab Emirates is to give $50m (£36m) to help rebuild a landmark mosque in the Iraqi city of Mosul blown up by Islamic State militants.

Mosul's landmark mosque to be rebuilt

People can't eat mosques.
No, but 50 million will pay the wages of a lot of local labourers and they can feed themselves on their pay.
 
Firebrand cleric Sadr on course to win Iraq election
Article on the rise of Sadr who many posters will recall with his ‘Mahdi Army’. He’s both anti US and anti Iran. He won’t become Prime Minister but his party could take a substantial block of seats and be a part of the coalition govt:
Powerful nationalist cleric Moqtada al-Sadr was leading in Iraq’s parliamentary election with more than half the votes counted, the electoral commission said, a surprise comeback for a Shi’ite leader who had been sidelined by Iran-backed rivals.
 
No, but 50 million will pay the wages of a lot of local labourers and they can feed themselves on their pay.
50 mil will barely cover the bribes required at every level, let alone pay for materials and wages. It certainly won't pay for a new middle class and everything else needed.
 
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Firebrand cleric Sadr on course to win Iraq election
Article on the rise of Sadr who many posters will recall with his ‘Mahdi Army’. He’s both anti US and anti Iran. He won’t become Prime Minister but his party could take a substantial block of seats and be a part of the coalition govt:
Is he that bad though, he seems quite pragmatic and more concerned with having a power base for himself than doing an ISIS ?
 
Is he that bad though, he seems quite pragmatic and more concerned with having a power base for himself than doing an ISIS ?
IS are pretty much (they are in some areas, but really no ground held per se, other than just over the border in Syria) over in Iraq. Iraq’s biggest problems are reconstruction of towns formerly held by IS and somehow making the Sunni’s part of the country. He’s not particularly anti Sunni and has supported them in the past, notably Fallujah. However, he is against foreign powers notably US and Iran.

Without the US, is Iraq really going to get the reconstruction aid and programmes promised? It’s too early to say but his party could be good overall for Iraq but there’s a few intermediate problems that need resolving and whether his party can do it, I’m not sure at the moment.
 
50 mil will barely cover the bribes required at every level, let alone pay for materials and wages. It certainly won't pay for a newnmiddle class and everything else needed.
50 million for one prestige building. Probably need about 100 billion, of which only about 30 billion is funded for the whole area.
 
Is he that bad though, he seems quite pragmatic and more concerned with having a power base for himself than doing an ISIS ?
He's said some pretty progressive stuff in regards to sectarian reunification in Iraq and keeping out Iranian influence.

We did regard him as a barrier to security in 2004 though. He took advantage of poor preparation and hopefull thinking on behalf of UK politicians and took full advantage to the extent that the place is run by gangsters and clerics.
 
He's said some pretty progressive stuff in regards to sectarian reunification in Iraq and keeping out Iranian influence.

We did regard him as a barrier to security in 2004 though. He took advantage of poor preparation and hopefull thinking on behalf of UK politicians and took full advantage to the extent that the place is run by gangsters and clerics.
So a bit like Ireland then ;)
 
Iraqi election commission says Kirkuk voting stations under siege,...
Another couple of days before the results of the election are announced. In Kirkuk there are apparently armed people besieging the polling stations with staff inside querying the result. So far, they have said that the PUK (Kurds) won. However, this is being disputed by the Turkman and Arab communities:
Gunmen in the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk were on Wednesday besieging several polling stations containing election staff, four days after a national vote, the head of the electoral commission said.

Riyadh al-Badran said the gunmen, who he did not identify, were putting pressure on the commission to change the election results in the multi-ethnic region.

“The employees of the commission are in a hostage situation,” he said, calling on authorities to provide protection

The final nationwide results should be announced in the next two days, Badran said.

The initial results in Kirkuk were disputed by the Turkmen and Arab communities of the region which is also inhabited by a large Kurdish population.

The election commission said on Tuesday that initial results from Kirkuk indicated a win for the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), a historic Iraqi Kurdish party.
Iran is allegedly meddling in Iraq's 'democratic process'. Funny how some will mention US meddling, but not that of Iran or any other country. It remains to be seen whether Sadr's 'alliance' will form any part of the govt at this moment:
Initial nationwide results showed a surprise victory for the bloc that supports populist cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, a Shi’ite not aligned with Iran who campaigned on a nationalist platform, tapping into public resentment against widespread corruption and huge social disparities.

A tally by Reuters of provincial results announced over the past three days shows Sadr’s list leading, followed by Amiri, a close ally of Iran, and then outgoing Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani was holding talks with politicians in Baghdad to promote the formation of a new cabinet which would have Iran’s approval, two people familiar with the political process underway said.
 
The bloc backed by Muqtada al-Sadr has won the most seats in the election, with 54. Al-Fatih bloc won 47, and al-Abadi's Victory Alliance won 42. Coalition led by anti-U.S. cleric wins Iraq election | CBC News
Sadr himself cannot become prime minister because he did not run in the election, though his bloc's victory puts him in a position to have a strong say in negotiations. His Sairoon electoral list captured 54 parliamentary seats.

The Victory Alliance, headed by incumbent Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, trailed in third place with 42 seats, behind the Al-Fatih bloc, which won 47 seats.
Al-Sadr opposes all foreign domination of Iraq, including both the US and Iran.

Al-Sadr himself did not run in the election. In addition, his party having the largest number of seats does not guarantee that he will be able to pick the prime minister.
Winning the largest number of seats does not automatically guarantee that Sadr will be able to hand-pick a prime minister.
Other parties might yet combine to form a government without his party.
In his Baghdad stronghold of Sadr city, where posters of his father could be seen, people expressed concern that Sadr would be out-manoeuvred in what are expected to be long, tough talks on forming a government.
 
Iraqi cleric Sadr meets pro-Iran Amiri after election win
Having met Abidi (current PM, balances between Iran and US) yesterday, Sadr is meeting Amiri (pro Iran) today. Iran has previously said they won’t allow Sadr’s part to govern. However, as I mentioned, he can’t be PM as he didn’t run. Despite being anti Iranian he went there during the Telic years.

I assume he’s looking to see who will give his bloc the best deal for any future govt. with either Amiri (came 2nd) or Abidi (3rd) as PM

Cleric Sadr meets Iraq PM Abadi, hinting at coalition
As above re Abidi. He also met the 7th place candidate. Interestingly, as well as local Ambo’s, he met with the Saudi one:
In recent days, Sadr also met with Ammar al-Hakim, whose Hikma Movement trailed in seventh place, as well as with ambassadors from Iraq’s neighboring countries including Saudi Arabia, Tehran’s main rival in the Middle East.
They have 90 days to form a government
 

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