Iraq Desert Storm tanker interview

#1
Hello all: I found this while poking around on the web this morning. This is a combat camera interview from February 1991 with Captain Damian Homkins, a squadron 2/ic in the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/public/511.cfm

I joined ARRSE a few days ago and am a retired armor soldier of the US Army.

keep chargin', Mark
 
#2
Just a hint, we don't call ourselves "tankers", we call ourselves "Tankies", "Cavalrymen" or "Gods gift to women".
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#4
Red_6 said:
Hello all: I found this while poking around on the web this morning. This is a combat camera interview from February 1991 with Captain Damian Homkins, a squadron 2/ic in the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/public/511.cfm

I joined ARRSE a few days ago and am a retired armor soldier of the US Army.

keep chargin', Mark
Welcome Red enjoy it for what it is....and remember non of the abuse traded is ever that personal!!!
 
#5
Red_6 said:
Hello all: I found this while poking around on the web this morning. This is a combat camera interview from February 1991 with Captain Damian Homkins, a squadron 2/ic in the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards.

http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/public/511.cfm

I joined ARRSE a few days ago and am a retired armor soldier of the US Army.

keep chargin', Mark
Damian the 'Devil Child'! He is/was actually a 'Tankie' on attachment to ScotsDG at the time! :D
 
#6
Good vid! I was also an attached Tankie but with "C" Sqn. ScotsDG.
 
#8
Hey guys: Appreciate the welcome. I was a cavalry scout for most of my career, and served on the Bradley Fighting Vehicle. I was in the 1st ID during the Gulf War and in the video, the British officer mentioned the Iraqi 25th ID. They were the front line enemy defender on the berm line in our sector and my division made the assault on G-Day through their defenses. Your 1st UK Armoured Division was echeloned behind us and passed through our lines on G-Day to take up their place in the Corps frotntage. One of my enduring memories of that time was watching your units moving through our breach lines and seeing all the Union Jacks and pendants flying off the antennas.

During Desert Shield we had British and American units scattered together all across the desert. We did quite a bit of trading. Your rations were way better than ours. My favorite was baconburgers.

Here's another video from the same web site that shows some British Soldiers during the war.

http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/public/532.cfm

cheers, Mark
 
#9
Red_6 said:
Hey guys: Appreciate the welcome. I was a cavalry scout for most of my career, and served on the Bradley Fighting Vehicle. I was in the 1st ID during the Gulf War and in the video, the British officer mentioned the Iraqi 25th ID. They were the front line enemy defender on the berm line in our sector and my division made the assault on G-Day through their defenses. Your 1st UK Armoured Division was echeloned behind us and passed through our lines on G-Day to take up their place in the Corps frotntage. One of my enduring memories of that time was watching your units moving through our breach lines and seeing all the Union Jacks and pendants flying off the antennas.

During Desert Shield we had British and American units scattered together all across the desert. We did quite a bit of trading. Your rations were way better than ours. My favorite was baconburgers.

Here's another video from the same web site that shows some British Soldiers during the war.

http://www.realmilitaryflix.com/public/532.cfm

cheers, Mark
You obviously didn't try treacle pudding :dead:
 
#11
Red_6 said:
Your 1st UK Armoured Division was echeloned behind us and passed through our lines on G-Day to take up their place in the Corps frotntage. One of my enduring memories of that time was watching your units moving through our breach lines and seeing all the Union Jacks and pendants flying off the antennas.
When I went through I remember seeing a large sign on the berm reading "Your now entering Iraq courtesy of The Big Red One." One of yours? It's scary to think that it was 17 years ago now.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#12
ken_khon said:
Red_6 said:
Your 1st UK Armoured Division was echeloned behind us and passed through our lines on G-Day to take up their place in the Corps frotntage. One of my enduring memories of that time was watching your units moving through our breach lines and seeing all the Union Jacks and pendants flying off the antennas.
When I went through I remember seeing a large sign on the berm reading "Your now entering Iraq courtesy of The Big Red One." One of yours? It's scary to think that it was 17 years ago now.
BFBS Germany about 1982. Film of The Big Red One came out. The BFBS presenter couldn't figure out why it was a war film and not a porn film.

Like the old joke about a turd burglar coming out of the cinema whinging that Grand Prix was all about motor racing.
 
#14
ken_khon said:
Red_6 said:
Your 1st UK Armoured Division was echeloned behind us and passed through our lines on G-Day to take up their place in the Corps frotntage. One of my enduring memories of that time was watching your units moving through our breach lines and seeing all the Union Jacks and pendants flying off the antennas.
When I went through I remember seeing a large sign on the berm reading "Your now entering Iraq courtesy of The Big Red One." One of yours? It's scary to think that it was 17 years ago now.
We must have passed the very same spot then. I seem to remember it said 'You are entering occupied Iraq, courtesy of the Big Red One'. :) I lost the photo of the sign some years ago sadly. :(
 
#15
Ord_Sgt said:
We must have passed the very same spot then. I seem to remember it said 'You are entering occupied Iraq, courtesy of the Big Red One'. :) I lost the photo of the sign some years ago sadly. :(
On reflection I'm sure it wasn't "your." :oops: Whatever the sign said, by the time I got there, they were probably on their second or third revision. It's a shame Granby was pre digital. All I've got to go by is a dodgy memory and half a dozen photos blagged off mates.
 
#16
busted_CAT_79 said:
Nice one Red, I'm ex-cavalry, Chieftain Regiment, worked with some of your boys from the 'Hell on Wheels' in the mid to late 70's in West Germany. They were based in Bremen.
2 US Armd Div, had a big camp in Bremerhaven as well. I used to nip down there from Verden to sample the delights of the PX. Remind me, was it Hell on or Helen Wheels? :roll:
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#17
ken_khon said:
busted_CAT_79 said:
Nice one Red, I'm ex-cavalry, Chieftain Regiment, worked with some of your boys from the 'Hell on Wheels' in the mid to late 70's in West Germany. They were based in Bremen.
2 US Armd Div, had a big camp in Bremerhaven as well. I used to nip down there from Verden to sample the delights of the PX. Remind me, was it Hell on or Helen Wheels? :roll:
Flashback to 1980. With 1 Br Corps, 2 US Armd Div and a Bundeswehr Panzerdivision (whose designation escapes me) due to deploy on Spearpoint, 3 Armd Div, umpires for the rest of 1 Corps, deployed a week early to take part in Ex Javelin, to CPX the FTX if you see what I mean: see what the brand spanking new Clansman would do, see how the Corps coped with every frequency band in use by at least two nets, etc.

The day came when we were to CPX the arrival stage left of Helen Wheels courtesy of Op Reforger (direct from Fort Worth, Tx IIRC). We were all nicely working through the Pink when somebody came up with a NoDuff msg informing us that he had seen a helicopter go down at (grid supplied, which was in the 4 Armd Div area).

All the emergency protocols kicked in and everybody not directly involved put on another brew, listening in to the net to see what developed. (We were listening in on what ought to have been 4 Armd Div Command Net, as we were to be umpires for TFH for the duration.)

The CO had discovered that he could save himself an awful lot of multi-tasking by putting the under-used Rebro Ferrets to good use and I spent the three weeks of Javelin / Spearpoint leading him around the countryside; his driver simply followed my driver, I mapread and the CO got on with the task in hand. (Having said we were under-utilised, Spearpoint was the only exercise ever where I was called upon to set up a Rebro.)

An awful lot of people got sucked into heading for the crash site to see how things were going. That included us.

The recovery went on for hours and hours, with the GOC 4 Armd Div getting hotter and more bothered by the minute. Over and over he bollicked the half colonel who had sent the original NoDuff msg, mainly because there was no sign of a crashed helicopter. His map-reading skills were brought into question; his Mapco skills were brought into question. After a couple of hours his parentage was brought into question.

Eventually, the GOC came on air and asked the half colonel direct whether he had himself personally seen this helicopter go down. You could hear the sharp intakes of breath across the entire Corps Area without the need for radio when the half colonel replied, "My Pink says I have to send a NoDuff message reporting that I have seen a helicopter go down at (grid supplied). I haven't actually seen it go down: it's only an exercise element."

There was an awful lot of chuckling going on but not in the presence of the GOC and it was suggested that in future, NoDuff messages that were on the Pink on a CPX be preceded by the exercise name (or maybe the word "exercise"? It was a long time ago) to differentiate it from a real NoDuff.

Maybe you had to be there.
 
#18
ken_khon said:
When I went through I remember seeing a large sign on the berm reading "Your now entering Iraq courtesy of The Big Red One." One of yours? It's scary to think that it was 17 years ago now.
Hey Ken: Yes, the years definitely go by. We probably breathed the same dust.

Is this what the sign looked like? There must've been several variations. I took this picture up in Safwan after the cease fire:
 

Attachments

#19
AlienFTM said:
ken_khon said:
BFBS Germany about 1982. Film of The Big Red One came out. The BFBS presenter couldn't figure out why it was a war film and not a porn film.

Like the old joke about a turd burglar coming out of the cinema whinging that Grand Prix was all about motor racing.
That's a funny story. In 1986, AAFES released the movie Platoon in overseas theaters the same time as it came out stateside. My unit, (the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment) was in Graf at the time and we were in the rear so a bunch of us hit the old Burger Bar (any of ya'll remember that place?) at Camp Aachen and went to the theater. When the film started running, it got so loud in there you couldn't hear the dialogue on screen. Half the theater was yelling "HOOAH!" and the other half was yelling, "SHUT THE FCUK UP!" It got so bad, they shut off the move and warned the audience they would close the theater if the crowd didn't settle down. It wasn't until the movie came out on VHS that I actually heard everything the cast said.

cheers, Mark
 
#20
Red_6 said:
Hey Ken: Yes, the years definitely go by. We probably breathed the same dust.

Is this what the sign looked like? There must've been several variations. I took this picture up in Safwan after the cease fire:
Dust? Fortunately, for those of us at the back there wasn't so much. It was too bloody wet. That sign certainly looks familiar. This far down the line I can't be too sure of course but it remains a very strong image. How many did you have made :D As said, I wish I'd had a camera.

Unless it's a figment of my beer sodden memory, I'm pretty sure we passed a downed Apache by the side of the track not far into Iraq. It looked intact and I'm sure it was mechanical failure but there wasn't a lot of activity around it. We halted briefly near there and I was presented with my first battlefield weapon pickup. A British SMG that must have bounced out of a side bin.
 

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