Iraq charter vote finely balanced

#1
Sunni-majority Anbar province in western Iraq has rejected the country's draft constitution by 96%, according to electoral official Abdul Hussein al-Hindawi.

The result means that the draft charter for a post-Saddam Hussein Iraq could be defeated if one more province musters a majority of two-thirds against it, under election rules.

Officials announced on Saturday that the province of Salaheddin had rejected the constitution by 81.5% in the 15 October vote.

If three of Iraq's 18 provinces vote against the charter with a two-thirds majority, it will be rejected, new elections held and a new draft written
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/D4CA142D-7C56-473C-B8BF-18C45A71D78E.htm
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#2
Like no one ever thought there would be a problem?

Pull out. Let them sort their own politics out. I'm sure that their own style of 'campaign drive' will be more suited to what they want and what they are used to.
 
#3
No surprises here Biscuits.

I wonder how they'll get round having another election and drafting another constitution once the Sunnis reject this?

Maybe the Sunnis will still lose though.

Oh dear
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#4
PtP, I sometimes beleive that they would have been better off under the last fella. Admittedly, it was a bit of a foregone conclusion, but at least they knew where they stood.

I wonder what history will make of us when this is eventually over.
 
#5
History is written by the victor Biscuits.

At least it was before the Internet , and that's what is screwing any dirty tricks that'll be tried. Personally, I'd get an independent body in to verify this count, because there is going to be blood spilt, and a lot of it.
 
#6
Of course it will pass - with 'rotten boroughs' ...sorry.... provinces like Nineveh.
The constitution's future looks bright.


Time story on possible voter fraud.
It is in Mosul, in Nineveh Province, that the Sunnis may have their best reason to cry foul. Early numbers from the Associated Press — which aren't endorsed by the Electoral Commission — showed almost twice as many "yes" votes for the constitution as the total number of voters in January's elections for the National Assembly, meaning that every new voter and then some voted for the constitution. Nineveh is generally considered a majority Sunni province, and Mosul was the hometown of many of Iraq's generals and other officers before the 2003 invasion. "Mosul doesn't make any sense," said Mutlaq.
 
#8
Thank god for that late truckload of ballots..does anyone else think the 97% against in Anbar was a feck up, they were planning to rig the vote for a Saddam-style "99% in favour" but got it arrse about face?
 
#9
Iraq's first post-Saddam Hussein constitution has been approved, the independent electoral commission said, announcing the final results of this month's landmark referendum.


The new charter passed by a simple majority after opponents failed to muster the two-thirds majority in three of Iraq's 18 provinces necessary to block ratification, commission spokesman Farid Ayyar said.

The outcome of the 15 October referendum finally hinged on the results of the mainly Sunni northern province of Nineveh which was among the last provinces to declare its results.

Two other Sunni majority provinces had already voted against the charter by the necessary two-thirds majority but Nineveh voters only rejected the text by 55% to 45%, insufficient to block its adoption.

Judicial supervision

Spokesman of the Iraqi National Dialogue Council, Salih al-Mutlaq, called for repeating the referendum in some governorates under international and Iraqi judicial supervision.


Speaking to Aljazeera on Tuesday, al-Mutlaq said that results of the referendum had been forged in some governorates.


"We believe that the results have been forged in Mosul, Diyala and most southern Iraqi governorates," he said.

"We call for repeating the referendum in Diwaniya, Samawa, Mosul and Diyala governorates under UN and Iraqi judicial supervision."


Al-Mutlaq added: "We will recognise the constitution in this case only; otherwise, this constitution then represents an extreme failure in Iraq and we do not recognise it."

Sunni Arabs, who dominated Saddam Hussein's and all previous Iraqi governments, generally opposed the new constitution, fearing its federal nature would leave the country's vast oil resources in the hands of Kurds and Shia
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/6D18884D-32FE-4933-95B3-7D4BB5DA2178.htm

Results (early)

Provinces
Yes (%) No (%)

Al-Anbar (capital Ramadi)
03.04 96.96

Arbil (Arbil) 99.36 00.64

Babil (Hilla) 94.56 05.44

Baghdad (Baghdad) 77.70 22.30

Basra (Basra) 96.02 03.98

Dhi Qar (Nasiriyah) 97.15 02.85

Diyala (Baquba) 51.27 48.73

Dohuk (Dohuk) 99.13 00.87

Karbala (Karbala) 96.58 03.42

Misan (Amara) 97.79 02.21

Muthanna(Samawa) 98.65 01.35

Najaf (Najaf) 95.82 04.18

Nineveh (Mosul) 44.92 55.08

Qadisya (Diwaniya) 96.74 03.26

Salah al-din (Tikrit) 18.25 81.75

Al-Sulaimaniya (al-Sulaimaniya) 98.96 01.04

Tamim (Kirkuk) 62.91 37.09

Wasit (Kut) 95.70 04.30
Nineveh is certainly surprising.
 
#12
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/EED904BC-115F-4108-8CE2-4D762C906A7C.htm

The votes have been counted and the draft constitution approved, but Iraqi opinion remains divided over the referendum results.


While the passage of the constitution has been welcomed by many, an equally vocal section is crying foul, alleging large-scale fraud.

Hussain al-Shahristani, deputy chairman of the Iraqi National Congress welcomed the results as positive.

Ali al-Lami, a politician from the al-Daawa Party which supported the draft constitution, also hailed the results. "The majority of Iraqis actually find it the best solution for avoiding future emergence of any possible dictators in the Iraqi state," he said.

Supporters of the constitution claim federalism is the only way to restore rights to the provinces neglected earlier and ensure equitable distribution of the country's wealth.

The outcome of the 15 October referendum finally hinged on the results of the mainly Sunni northern province of Nineveh which was among the last provinces to declare its results.

Two other Sunni majority provinces had already voted against the charter by the necessary two-thirds majority but Nineveh voters only rejected the text by 55% to 45%, insufficient to block its adoption.

Critics

But those opposed to the constitution have been less than gracious in defeat. They say the new charter will result in a form of cantonisation, dividing Iraq into small weak states.

"If the governor of Nasiriya province refused to provide electricity to Baghdad while he was getting a salary from the central government, do you think he will give anything when he is independent? We are not ready for this nonsense yet," said Safaa al-Ani, a senior member of the National Dialogue Congress


Mahmood al-Azzawi, also a prominent member of the National Dialogue Congress claimed the entire electoral process was rigged.

"Fraud occurred, especially in regard to the Mosul vote. It is too big to have any dispute about."

He added: "Eighty-six per cent of Mosul's residents voted no and that was according to accurate statistics made by over 300 independent supervisors in the province."

Salih al-Mutlag, the spokesman for the National Dialogue Congress, said a recount in Mosul will possibly be demanded.
 
#13
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/713A8386-23F1-4225-B27A-B1CFF8C2A840.htm

Nearly all Sunnis voted against the constitution, fearing that it would break Iraq into two oil-rich nearly autonomous regions - a Kurdish one in the north and a Shia one in the south - and leave most Sunni in a weak district in central and western Iraq.

Tariq al-Hashimi, the general-secretary of the Iraqi Islamic party dismissed such allegations and said Sunni Arabs region contain the source of life of the Iraqi south where Shia live, which is water.

"If Sunnis are just fearing from being left without oil we would not have gone to the Shia and Kurds to ask them to change the constitution and make Iraq's natural resources under the control of the central government" he told Aljazeera.net
Gold star for Jonwilly and PTP :D

How long before they start fighting over that Jon?
 
#14
Knowledgebale people have for over 20 years been telling me that water is the next thing nations will fight over.
Iraq is the land of the two rivers and it was they that determined the location of Bagdhad way back in history.
Mind you the water cums from the mountains of Turkey one more factor to confuse the issue.
King George says once again we are in untill the Iraqi Forces can do the biz.
He needs the Reservists and National Guard out for next years congresional/senate erections.
The plans would need to be made soon if not already.
john
Scotland controls so much of Englands water, howcum savages get so much of natures narural resourses ?
 
#15
jonwilly said:
Vote soon, vote often.
john
Trad USA Annon
That suggestion was attributed to Al Capone but I have read that it was more likely coined by one of his lieutenants, Murray "The Camel" Humphries who came to these shores from Wales.

Humphries, the sometimes Will Rogers of organized crime, has also been credited with the aphorism (also frequently but wrongly attributed to Mr. Capone) that you'll get better results with a smile and a gun than you would with just a smile.
 
#16
Ah an ethusiast.
Vote early vote often, was I think the actual quoate.
Virgin territory for whorehouse was another saying atributed to Big Al or Murry the Camel.
john
 

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