Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Iran

When China considers joining the Hormuz straits Naval coalition to escort ships the you know the Iranians have started losing international support.

Because the Chinese need Iranian oil more than anybody..
 
Because the Chinese need Iranian oil more than anybody..
According to the news story China's biggest oil supplier is Saudi Arabia, not Iran. It goes on to say that a war in the Persian Gulf would throttle Saudi oil exports and affect China that way.

The Chinese apparently see having a multinational naval force as means of reining in the Americans to prevent them from kicking off a general war in the area.

The story also notes that for the Chinese it's a balancing act. A general war in the Persian Gulf would suck in American resources which the Americans would have to pull out of east Asia, weakening them relative to the Chinese there and so suit Chinese strategic interests.

However, balanced against that is the increase in world oil prices which would be against Chinese economic interests.

So far the Chinese seem to be coming down on the side of their economic interests, hence their wanting to avoid a major war in the Persian Gulf and hence their wanting some mechanism to help prevent the Americans from starting one accidentally or intentionally.
 
some mechanism to help prevent the Americans from starting one accidentally or intentionally.
It would seem that it is Iran that has been desperately trying to start one...probably because of the sh*t state the nation is is under the Mullahs.

They would like to focus the nation’s attention on some external enemy to prevent internal dissent which has been steadily increasing over years of poor government.
 
Last edited:
Iran may well catch more attention than they wished for after their Houthis surrogates are denying any part of the cruise missile attack on the Suadi oil plant.

Iran’s false flag surrogate trouble making in the ME has long been known, this time the surrogates appear a little nervous about consequences and are backing out of taking the blame.
 
Iran may well catch more attention than they wished for after their Houthis surrogates are denying any part of the cruise missile attack on the Suadi oil plant.

Iran’s false flag surrogate trouble making in the ME has long been known, this time the surrogates appear a little nervous about consequences and are backing out of taking the blame.
The Houthis yesterday stated that they had scored a major victory over the Saudis on the ground, although it looks more like a localised event with a small number of vehicles involved.

 
Yulia Yuzik could face 10 years in prison if found guilty of working for Israeli intelligence agencies
1570198269912.png
 
Iran appears not to have wound down their recent aggression but to continue to look for ways to attack in a deniable way using proxies. They are however under intensive scrutiny.
 
Yesterday we had women being allowed to join the Army in Saudi Arabia, now we have women in Iran allowed to watch football (segregated from men - obviously):


That fact that an Iranian woman has died after burning herself alive following her trial for trying to watch a game last week is irrelevant.

Encouraging to see so many Iranian women have taken up football.:

1570779073613.png



Great progress indeed.
 
Yesterday we had women being allowed to join the Army in Saudi Arabia, now we have women in Iran allowed to watch football (segregated from men - obviously):


That fact that an Iranian woman has died after burning herself alive following her trial for trying to watch a game last week is irrelevant.

Encouraging to see so many Iranian women have taken up football.:

View attachment 422080


Great progress indeed.
Very progressive of them indeed. What other country can claim to have so many trans-gender players on any of their national teams?

Further from the story, it appears this is not a new problem.
In 2014, the country's football governing body introduced random checks after it was revealed that four national team players were either men who had not completed sex change operations, or were suffering from sexual development disorders.

In 2010, doubts were raised about the gender of the team's goalkeeper.

The national authorities have reportedly ordered that the entire team and some players from other teams be tested to determin gender.
On Wednesday, authorities reportedly ordered gender testing of the entire national squad and leading league players.

The names of who the eight who are believed to be men hasn't been revealed, but going by the photo in your post I would have my doubts about all of them.
The names of the players thought to be male were not revealed.
 
Apparently, according to some unnamed officials, the US carried out a cyber attack on Iran in the wake of the attack on Saudi oil terminals. The attack was apparently on the regime's ability to spread 'propaganda' and affected physical hardware:
The United States carried out a secret cyber operation against Iran in the wake of the Sept. 14 attacks on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities, which Washington and Riyadh blame on Tehran, two U.S. officials have told Reuters.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the operation took place in late September and took aim at Tehran’s ability to spread “propaganda.”

One of the officials said the strike affected physical hardware, but did not provide further details.
Iran denies it happened:
Asked about Reuters reporting on Wednesday, Iran’s Minister of Communications and Information Technology Mohammad Javad Azari-Jahromi said: “They must have dreamt it,” Fars news agency reported.
 
Ever since STUXNET, it seems that the US is using Iran as a real-world cyber range.

'The United States has the ability to end the internet blackout in Iran, and ensure it is free of government blockers, the US ambassador to Germany Richard Allen Grenell said on Sunday. In a tweet, Grenell said, “We have the technical ability to turn the internet on for the people of Iran. And ensure it is free of government blockers. Europe and America should do it together.” '

 
Hardly what you'd consider an unbiased source, but it certainly seems that the locals are getting restless.

'The uprising of the Iranian people throughout the country spread to at least 65 cities in 25 provinces. Security forces have killed eight protesters and injured many others in clashes between courageous youth and savage suppressive forces of the police, IRGC, paramilitary Basij, intelligence services, and plain-clothed criminals affiliated with the regime.

'Protesters have torched centers of repression and plunder, including Bassij bases and government-controlled banks in many cities. Large posters of Khomeini and his successor Ali Khamenei, supreme leader of the regime, and a huge symbol of Khomeini’s ring in the city of Shahriar, in the southwestern suburbs of Tehran, were set ablaze.'


 
Fuel (petrol and diesel) prices have historically been heavily subsidised in many OPEC countries. Attempts by governments to cut subsidies are often met with widespread public protests. Similar fuel price rises were one of the original major root causes behind the protests in Venezuela (although things there deteriorated beyond just that).

Fuel subsidies are a major drain on the public budget, especially as a lot of subsidised fuel gets smuggled out of the country. There are a lot of unregistered barges and small tankers smuggling fuel from Iran to the UAE despite Iranian attempts to stop them. Quite a bit gets smuggled into Turkey as well, by truck.

The government has just hiked petrol prices by 50 percent - to 13 cents a litre. You can buy 60 litres per month at that price, after which you pay double that, 26 cents, for anything over that per month. My heart bleeds for them.

The Iranian government has been trying to cut the subsidies for decades, but it's been such a political hot potato that not much progress has been made. It is something they seriously need to do though, as there are far better things to spend public funds on than subsidising the driving habits of the better off (the poorest of course don't have cars).
 
Seems brave when government snipers have been allegedly shooting protesters in Kermanshah

 
According to the news story China's biggest oil supplier is Saudi Arabia, not Iran. It goes on to say that a war in the Persian Gulf would throttle Saudi oil exports and affect China that way.

The Chinese apparently see having a multinational naval force as means of reining in the Americans to prevent them from kicking off a general war in the area.

The story also notes that for the Chinese it's a balancing act. A general war in the Persian Gulf would suck in American resources which the Americans would have to pull out of east Asia, weakening them relative to the Chinese there and so suit Chinese strategic interests.

However, balanced against that is the increase in world oil prices which would be against Chinese economic interests.

So far the Chinese seem to be coming down on the side of their economic interests, hence their wanting to avoid a major war in the Persian Gulf and hence their wanting some mechanism to help prevent the Americans from starting one accidentally or intentionally.

The Persians have less hard currency, so they barter against goods when they can, which China has plenty of.

Yes, there are lot more dimensions to the scenario.

The Indians have also been major importers of Iranian oil, but now are throttling down because of U.S. pressure.
 
Civil unrest in Iran rising to unprecedented levels. The leadership cracking down hard. Their recent attempts to provoke an external incident to divert the population’s attention hasn’t worked.

They may be driven to do something really stupid in desperation, but at the moment seem to have their hands full at home.
 

Latest Threads

Top