Iran to build 10 more nuclear plants and Increase Military

#1
Note the last sentence--haven't we seen this a few times before with really great results from our ever-effective UN?

Iran plans to build 10 more nuclear plants
Despite Western threats of sanctions, Tehran says it will build more nuclear fuel plants and beef up its military.


Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad speaks at a ceremony in Tehran. The flurry of pronouncements hailing national achievements comes ahead of annual commemorations of Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution on Thursday. (Abedin Taherkenareh, EPA / February 8, 2010)

Reporting from Paris and Beirut - As Iran moved to enrich uranium to a higher level of purity and build new nuclear-fuel plants, U.S. and French defense officials suggested Monday that sanctions were needed to force Tehran to curb its nuclear program.

Speaking in Paris, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates again dismissed military action but said that given Iran's rejections of Western proposals, the international community needed to apply some pressure.

"We must still try and find a peaceful way to resolve this issue. The only path that is left to us at this point, it seems to me, is that pressure track," Gates said, "but it will require all of the international community to work together."

Iran's envoy to the United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency said his nation would begin enriching fuel for a Tehran medical reactor Tuesday, amid heightened international concern over Iran's atomic research program and rising discord within its political system.

Ali Asghar Soltanieh, Iran's ambassador to the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency, said Monday that Iran had informed inspectors that it intended to begin further refining its uranium.

"We will start this activity as of" Tuesday, he said. "We have invited agency inspectors to be present."

Iranian officials trumpeted an array of new nuclear and military ambitions Monday ahead of Thursday's anniversary of the 1979 Islamic Revolution, traditionally marked by a nationalistic pro-government festival. This year, Iran's opposition movement has vowed to turn the event into an anti-government rally.

Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, announced that Tehran had informed the IAEA that it intended to begin construction of 10 nuclear fuel plants in the Persian calendar year that starts in March. Iranian military officials revealed plans to build military planes, aerial drones and antiaircraft missiles.

Experts and international inspectors have concluded that Iran's nuclear program has been stagnant in the months since a political crisis erupted following President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's reelection in June. The vote has been widely disputed in Iran.

Until now, Iran has produced reactor-grade 3.5%-enriched uranium and has built only one functioning nuclear-fuel plant near the town of Natanz.

Few experts believe it has the infrastructure to build 10 enrichment facilities any time soon. Iran also lacks a plant to turn enriched uranium into fuel plates for the medical reactor.

But Soltanieh said Iran operates a facility near the city of Isfahan that could be outfitted to produce the rectangular fuel plates for the Tehran medical reactor, which produces isotopes for the diagnosis and treatment of serious illnesses.

Salehi said Tehran's move was meant only to help cancer patients.

"We will stop enrichment as soon as we get the necessary fuel for the reactor," he said.

Western diplomats have vowed to pursue tougher sanctions against Iran to pressure it into curbing sensitive components of its nuclear and missile programs that they allege are the cornerstones of an eventual atomic weapons capability.

They accuse Iran of failing to respond adequately to a U.N.-backed offer to transfer the bulk of its low-enriched uranium abroad in exchange for 20%-enriched fuel plates.

French Defense Minister Herve Morin said the international community has tried to engage in peaceful dialogue with Iran involving "full transparency."

"It's led to nothing," Morin said, warning that if Iran didn't stop, Western allies would pursue sanctions.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-fg-iran-nuclear9-2010feb09,0,1547705.story
 
#2
The BBC did this this morning.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/8505426.stm

Although there is a risk in that it could take the Iranians up to 6 months to put together enough uranium (assuming the Natanz plant is the only one they have working on it, without any more James Bond Supervillain underground bases popping up), that doesn't mean that they would be able to use it.

Even if they have a bomb blueprint courtesy of the Pakistanis, that still doesn't mean it would work first time (the North Korean one didn't) or that they have a practical delivery system.

They could bodge together a Uranium bomb but it would be pretty huge, and probably wouldn't fit on any of their missiles. I seriously doubt that they have the ability to convert the Uranium into the plutonium for the smaller warhead that would fit. Even if they could get the bird to fly, I think there 's a fairly good chance either the US or Israel could knock it out. They haven't got enough hardware to saturate the defences to guarantee a hit in the old Cold War manner, so theat would leave them wide open to all manner of retaliation from the Israelis. Who do have working missiles.

They could build a 'dirty' bomb now, but that wouldn't be flamboyant enough.

Personally I think this is headline grabbing to try and fill the papers with Western denunciations before the Revolution anniversary in a couple of days time. Otherwise the Western media might be more interested in things like civil disobedience, extra judicial killings, imprisonment without trial, and all the other good stuff the mullahs have been up to lately.
 
#4
HectortheInspector said:
The BBC did this this morning.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/8505426.stm

Although there is a risk in that it could take the Iranians up to 6 months to put together enough uranium (assuming the Natanz plant is the only one they have working on it, without any more James Bond Supervillain underground bases popping up), that doesn't mean that they would be able to use it.

Even if they have a bomb blueprint courtesy of the Pakistanis, that still doesn't mean it would work first time (the North Korean one didn't) or that they have a practical delivery system.

They could bodge together a Uranium bomb but it would be pretty huge, and probably wouldn't fit on any of their missiles. I seriously doubt that they have the ability to convert the Uranium into the plutonium for the smaller warhead that would fit. Even if they could get the bird to fly, I think there 's a fairly good chance either the US or Israel could knock it out. They haven't got enough hardware to saturate the defences to guarantee a hit in the old Cold War manner, so theat would leave them wide open to all manner of retaliation from the Israelis. Who do have working missiles.

They could build a 'dirty' bomb now, but that wouldn't be flamboyant enough.

Personally I think this is headline grabbing to try and fill the papers with Western denunciations before the Revolution anniversary in a couple of days time. Otherwise the Western media might be more interested in things like civil disobedience, extra judicial killings, imprisonment without trial, and all the other good stuff the mullahs have been up to lately.
Good points as usual. I guess I was more drawn to the statement of the Frenchman as another reminder of how ineffective our international structures can be at times.
 
#5
I feel the Iranian government led by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is angling for some sort of confrontation with the West to distract the Iranian peoples'critiscim of the Iranian regime.

It is an open secret last year's elections were rigged,and street protests are ongoing with,according to BBC reports one in Tehran on 11th February to co-incide with the 31st anniversary of the overthrow of the Shah if Iran.The opposition is gaining popular support with the general population who are suffering several hardships as a result of the Islamic regime.

Any external attack upon Iran will solidify support behind the present regime.Something for the planners in Washington DC and Tel Aviv to consider.
 
#6
Le_addeur_noir said:
Any external attack upon Iran will solidify support behind the present regime.Something for the planners in Washington DC and Tel Aviv to consider.
As has been discussed on other threads, I think the larger issue for planners is whether or not any attack short of nuclear or at least a coordinated air/ground campaign (not merely one or 2 air sorties) will be worth the effort in terms of actual disruption of Iran's nuclear effort. Again, that is the frustration of the incredible delays we have seen over the years in doing anything effective in positively influencing these sorts of situations where an unstable nation (or its ruling elite) basically thumbs its nose at the world community in terms of wmd development.
 
#7
Threatening words from the French, I can't see imadinnerjacket being too concerned.

The article I read yesterday, noted that they could only enrich to 20%, weapons grade nukes need 90%, and to do that they would need specialist equipment that currently has an export ban on it?

I can't see Pakistan being to co-operative with the Iranian’s at the moment with half of Europe and the US in Afghan, and the rest in an armada floating off the coast. The Chinese surely don't want a rouge state (N Korea is a different situation), having nukes within chucking distance of them?
 

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