Iran Election: Hardliners In - Reformists Out

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by In-Limbo, Mar 14, 2008.

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  1. Today, the Authoritarian Regime placed 139 in the 'World Democracy Rankings' showed why they've earned this hard won reputation.

    Over the months, the Ayatollah has seen fit to remove in excess of 1,700 so called reformists from being able to stand as candidates in the election. Sifting through the normal high/low turnout spin, it appears that a great many ordinary Iranians choose to stay away from the polls in silent protest at what is seen as a preordained outcome of a win-win for the hardliners.

    Previous turnouts that saw the reformists rise to power and a softening of Iran's stance to international relations were as high as 80%. Today's reality set against a climate of rising inflation, an ever widening class gap, ailing economy and disillusioned public see's a sharp turn away from this trend.

    Increasingly the Revolutionary Guardsmen and Basiji militants have been encouraged to fill the gaps left behind by the reformist ejection, leading to what some correspondents view as an entrenchment and even a growing coup d'etat of the paramilitary firmly into Iran's power base.

    Three days previously the commander of Centcom, Admiral William Fannon handed in his resignation bringing again to the table tensions in the capital over possible confrontations with Iran and the Bush Administration.

    A mere coincidence of timing? Or an ill wind blowing for things still left unaddressed?

    Discuss.
     
  2. No doubt that we (allied troops) are going to remain in Iraq for years to come.
     
  3. It's always been the case that the reformists have at least offered alternative horizons.

    This posture from Iran to remove them as a whole body makes your observation all the more real.
     
  4. Well, we have got ourselves into a quagmire in Iraq and there is now no alternative but to 'dig-in' for the long haul.
    To much at stake, economically to pull out and let Iran take over Iraq and then who's next?. The domino theory?. Vietnam comparison?.
     
  5. Years ago when I was at school the mob could sense conflict was close and we would all chant, FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHTFIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHTFIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHTFIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHTFIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT


    Well, that's what I think is going to happen. Dunno when, but sometime.
     
  6. Could be... could be...!
     
  7. “There are concerns regarding some irregularities by willful people to do something with the ballot boxes,” Mehdi Karroubi, head of the reformist Etemad-e Melli party told reporters at the interior ministry.

    He said that he had received sporadic reports of individuals inside polling stations handing voters lists of the candidates and telling them to vote for these names.

    “They say ‘write down these names’.

    - Gulf time: Saturday, 15 March, 2008, 02:22 AM Doha Time

    Even when you turn up to cast your vote, some among the Iranian public are simply being instructed to drive through certain pre-selected candidates.

    Benign? I think not.
     
  8. I don't think Bush has enough time to build up public support for an attack after that CIA report kiboshed the first attempt.

    The Iranian regime may be getting shakier and needed a bit of rigging but I can't see them starting anything until after they've built their nuke.

    So I can't really see anything happening until then, not unless Bush and chums decide they don't care about the political fallout from just attacking without preparing the voters first. Which is possible I spose.
     
  9. The US won't have to attack Iran. Israel will do it first. There is no way they are going to let Iran develop a nuclear weapon. They have 'bunker busting' bombs, sent a few years ago under the pretence of using them in the mountains along the Syrian border. (those weapons incidentlly, were flown via the UK. It was reported in the press).

    So we can all sit back and let Israel do what is required at the right time, if the Iranians are stupid enough to go down this dangerous route.
     
  10. Or maybe hardliners won simply because Iranians feel their country under threat from US (the West) while in their mind reformists associate with the West and therefore unpopular in current circumstances.

    I sincerely hope Bush is not going to put his boot in Iran. It might prove to be the last straw for the Arabs.
     
  11. My bold.

    Yeah I left that bit out. I'm assuming if Bush and chums won't be able to do it that the Israelis will. If it's possible just from the air (no idea if it is or not).
     
  12. Point-missing sale this way -------------------------------->

    They're not even getting the option to vote for reformers. And assuming the Arab world gives a sh1t what happens to Iran, what are they likely to do about it?
     
  13. I have no doubt that it will be an air attack. As previously stated they have the weapon to do it and a track record of bombing nuclear facilities, near completion, before.

    It could be a commando raid, but highly unlikely as the Iranian nuclear facilities are going to be heavily guarded.
     
  14. Every election in every country is rigged to a certain extent. Do you agree with this?
    Media is a tool of political spin. Do you agree with this?
    How much of the reported in the media is truth and how much spin?

    Maybe Arab world doesn't "give a sh1t" about Iran as such, but at some point Arab world will "give a sh1t" about the ease with which the West attacks Arab (Muslim) countries one by one on a whim.

    "...what are they likely to do about it?" ----------- possibilities are endless, but I really don't want to find out.