Iran begins new submarine production

#1
Iran has launched the production line of a new domestically-manufactured submarine in an attempt to boost its defensive capabilities.

Iranian Defense Minister Mostafa Mohammad-Najjar inaugurated the production line of the new submarine Qaaem, on Monday.

Qaaem functions as a submarine capable of carrying and firing various torpedoes and subsurface missiles with a special operation crew onboard.

During the opening ceremony, the Iranian defense official said the Islamic Republic has become self-sufficient in manufacturing all types of military vessels.

He added that the development of new military equipment, such as the surface and subsurface missiles, would increase the navy's ability to defend Iranian territorial waters and prevent an attack against the country.

""Iran is the main force safeguarding peace and security in the Persian Gulf and the Sea of Oman with its strong presence in the strategic region,"" said the brigadier general.

Mohammad-Najjar added that the greatest threat against the security of the Persian Gulf and the Strait of Hormuz is the presence of foreign forces. The Strait of Hormuz is an essential waterway that connects the oil-rich region to the high sea.

""The withdrawal of these forces will set the scene for sustainable security in the region,"" explained the defense minister.

The launch of the production line comes amid reports that an armada of the U.S. and European warships will be deployed in the Persian Gulf in an unprecedented build-up.

The U.S. and Israel have long threatened to attack Iran over its nuclear program.

Washington demands that Tehran end its uranium enrichment program despite the country being entitled to the peaceful applications of nuclear technology under the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

In reaction to the U.S. threats, Iran has begun revamping its fighter jets and supplying its navy with sophisticated military equipment, such as a high-tech weapons system, reportedly capable of targeting any vessel within a range of 300 km from its shores.
http://www.tehrantimes.com/index_View.asp?code=176267
 
#3
The cold war is over - what could we possibly need a Navy for???
 
#5
Well thats settled it. Move over Jack - Room for a skinny one?

:D

"Iran is the main force safeguarding peace and security in the Persian Gulf and the Sea of Oman with its strong presence in the strategic region,"
Only because the thought of war with them has western arrses twitching. Well arrses or wallets, or both! 8O
 
#7
codbutt said:
That'll be a licence built Russian Kilo then. Ideal for what they want.
Or more likely an "Amur" - designed for export/local manufacture...
 
#8
Their targetting cell must have forgotten what daylight is...
 
#14
codbutt said:
That'll be a licence built Russian Kilo then. Ideal for what they want.
Thats actually not a bad call, they already have ex-Russian KILO's in service, and based their current mini sub fleet on a scaled down version. Were are they getting their high strength steels from for the hulls though? Doubt very much they have foundries of that sophistication in country - must have come from Mother Russia.

Side note, imagine the smell onboard one of the feck'ers, its bad enough with British Matlows - shudder to think what the Camel Whallopers would be like!!! :wink:
 
#15
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
And who said limiting astute production and winding down the navy was not short sighted?
Given the nature of this specific threat, Astute is far from the best tool for the task of hunting these chaps. Selling the Upholder class to the Canucks is revealed as one of this administration's biggest fuck-ups,"Oh, the cold war is over and the Russians are our best bosom buddies now; no need for any subs optimised to kick arrse in littoral water any more". I'd act surprised, but I'm not; smarter folk than me predicted as much back when they were decommissioned and put in mothballs. Anyone care to lay a bet on how long it is before the iranians attempt to sink a CV? And when they do brace yourself for $200 a barrel and a big scary economic meltdown.

/tinfoil hat.
 
#16
deSTABlised said:
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
And who said limiting astute production and winding down the navy was not short sighted?
Given the nature of this specific threat, Astute is far from the best tool for the task of hunting these chaps. Selling the Upholder class to the Canucks is revealed as one of this administration's biggest fuck-ups,"Oh, the cold war is over and the Russians are our best bosom buddies now; no need for any subs optimised to kick arrse in littoral water any more". I'd act surprised, but I'm not; smarter folk than me predicted as much back when they were decommissioned and put in mothballs. Anyone care to lay a bet on how long it is before the iranians attempt to sink a CV? And when they do brace yourself for $200 a barrel and a big scary economic meltdown.

/tinfoil hat.
I would have thought that the S&T, and in time A boats would be ideally suited to long patrols in the Straits of Hormuz. A DE boat would need to snort regularly, and would be picked up by IR on a MarPat. Other forms of propulsion are not developmentally ready yet.
 
#17
Iran is a third world country and I have little confidence in them coming up with anything approaching a world class design. Submarine building is not a simple skill set to aquire, note Australia's attempt a few years ago.

Remember a few days ago them gobbing off about putting a man into space as well, I won't hold my breath.
 
#18
'Given the nature of this specific threat, Astute is far from the best tool for the task of hunting these chaps.'

Quite true, Astute is still sitting in the DDH at Barrow and won't be going anywhere for a while.
 
#19
All_Torque said:
Iran is a third world country and I have little confidence in them coming up with anything approaching a world class design. Submarine building is not a simple skill set to aquire, note Australia's attempt a few years ago.

Remember a few days ago them gobbing off about putting a man into space as well, I won't hold my breath.
Perhaps you're unaware of Iran's reverse-engineering capabilities, particularly in aerospace?

With that much money sloshing around in their oil economy , they've more than enough to pay former Russian Boat Builders to do the same for them.

I've no doubt they can put a sub in the water, and I've no doubt they'll do it quickly.
 
#20
codbutt said:
That'll be a licence built Russian Kilo then. Ideal for what they want.
And a quiet little bugger to boot. SOSUS for the Gulf area anyone?
 

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